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    What do universities prefer and why? What are the advantags and disadvantages of doing one or the other? Ultimately, which one is the best? Thanks.
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    Though I would probably be biased in deciding which is best since I am doing the IB next year, the Universities don't mind as far as I know which one you do as long as you don't even sniff the BTEC. TBH, I prefer the IB.
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    Original thread.
    Some universities seem to prefer the IB because it's more stretching, but the offers are generally much harder to achieve. Ultimately, it depends on how much of a life you want outside of school and how much you want to specialise.
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    hit the search button.

    this has been done far too many times and turned to a ****** argument.
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    Their offers seem to suggest that they prefer A-levels (particularly Oxbridge).

    IB is obviously better, though.
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    They don't care as far as I can tell anyway. Whether or not the offers are equivalent in terms of difficulty remains to be decided.
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    They don't care as long as your HLs are appropriate. I'm in the camp that AAA at A Level is easier to achieve than 39-42 points and generally advise A Levels when you don't have a strong preference.
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    AAA = super easy because over 20,000 people achieve that. Much smaller than the percentage of people getting 38+ points. Comparing an offer of AAA or very often AA for engineering in Oxbridge is ridiculous compared to 38+ points AND 7s in maths and physics HL. Especially when 55% of people taking Further Maths at A level get As.

    Anyway, whatever, we just have to deal with this injustice and move on.
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    IB vs. A-Levels?
    Labour vs. Life?
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    (Original post by HiBear)
    hit the search button.

    this has been done far too many times and turned to a ****** argument.
    I do agree with you that the search function should have been used but the IB system and the A-Level system change over time.

    For example, A-Level now has A* grade and IB papers sometimes change in their format. So it's probably justifiable that the "IB vs A Levels" question is asked by people regularly.

    Those doing IB will do probably twice the work compared to those doing A-levels. Not only that, the IB students have to do certain types of subjects that they hate. E.g. They do not like Literature but they have to study it.

    In A-levels, normally you just need to do 3 full A-levels in any subjects you like (except for some restrictions such as the requirement of Maths if you want to do Further Maths). E.g. The mathematically inclined student can enjoy studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and/or even Additional Further Maths without having to do humanities subjects such as History and Literature.

    In both A-levels and IB, you can choose to study additional subjects. This is however far less common in IB than in A-levels.

    You'll most likely want to do A-levels and not the IB because there are no restrictions in your subject combination (except for Further Maths and Additional Further Mathematics which I know of).

    Also, as far as I know, A-level offers are easier to achieve compared to IB offers. Getting 40 points in IB is significantly harder than getting AAA in A-levels.
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    AAA = super easy because over 20,000 people achieve that. Much smaller than the percentage of people getting 38+ points.
    The percentage of people getting AAA at A level, and the percentage of people getting 37+ in the IB is about the same (around 10%), so I don't know what you're trying to say, other than that the IB tariff scores are clearly much too high, given that AAA scores 360 whereas 37 in the IB scores 582 tariff points.

    Comparing an offer of AAA or very often AA for engineering in Oxbridge is ridiculous compared to 38+ points AND 7s in maths and physics HL. Especially when 55% of people taking Further Maths at A level get As.
    Offers of AA would be for those that already have an A in maths. The reason such a high percentage of candidates get an A in further maths is that, generally, only the strongest mathematicians take it.

    Anyway, whatever, we just have to deal with this injustice and move on.
    What you have to deal with is an absurd persecution complex, not injustice.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    The percentage of people getting AAA at A level, and the percentage of people getting 37+ in the IB is about the same (around 10%), so I don't know what you're trying to say, other than that the IB tariff scores are clearly much too high, given that AAA scores 360 whereas 37 in the IB scores 582 tariff points.
    I can quite confidently say that the average IB student is a lot stronger than the average A level student, and I'm not saying this in terms of how difficult the IB or A levels are. Basically all schools offering the IB are private/independent, upper class schools. Look at places like Sevenoaks and North London Collegiate school where only the best students go to do IB. These students on average tend to be a lot smarter/more motivated than the average A level student. Remember I'm talking about averages here, because we're discussing statistics.

    Look at the percentage of people scoring As in the Sciences for A levels: http://www.bstubbs.co.uk/a-lev.htm
    Physics - 31.8%
    Biology - 26.7%
    Chemistry - 33.5%

    Now lets look at the IB HL Science percentages for people scoring 7s: http://www.scribd.com/doc/14874888/I...s-for-May-2008
    Physics - 8%
    Biology - 4%
    Chemistry - 10%

    Even if you add up the percentages of people getting 7s OR 6s, it's still lower than the percentage of As!

    Now please tell me, is it reasonable to offer one person AAA, whilst offering another person 40 points with 777 at HL?

    (Original post by BJack)
    Offers of AA would be for those that already have an A in maths. The reason such a high percentage of candidates get an A in further maths is that, generally, only the strongest mathematicians take it.

    Yes, and the percentage of people getting 7s in higher maths is 5-8%. Only the strongest mathematicians take it. The strongest of the strongest mathematicians take Further Maths at IB and again the percentage of 7s are 5-8%. We need to get 7s in maths and physics for Oxbridge. Oh, and we also have to get those grades for our 4 other subjects since the offers can go up to 43.

    (Original post by BJack)
    What you have to deal with is an absurd persecution complex, not injustice.
    What I have to deal with is universities not having a clue what the IB is. My sister got an offer from Surrey of 30 points with 7s in her highers. When she told them she was predicted 7s in her highers they looked at her as if it was a mediocre score. They probably thought it was out of 10. There's a reason why US colleges (who properly understand the IB) allow IB students achieving 7s in their highers to graduate in 3 years as opposed to 4.
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    I can quite confidently say that the average IB student is a lot stronger than the average A level student, and I'm not saying this in terms of how difficult the IB or A levels are. Basically all schools offering the IB are private/independent, upper class schools. Look at places like Sevenoaks and North London Collegiate school where only the best students go to do IB. These students on average tend to be a lot smarter/more motivated than the average A level student. Remember I'm talking about averages here, because we're discussing statistics.

    Look at the percentage of people scoring As in the Sciences for A levels: http://www.bstubbs.co.uk/a-lev.htm
    Physics - 31.8%
    Biology - 26.7%
    Chemistry - 33.5%

    Now lets look at the IB HL Science percentages for people scoring 7s: http://www.scribd.com/doc/14874888/I...s-for-May-2008
    Physics - 8%
    Biology - 4%
    Chemistry - 10%

    Even if you add up the percentages of people getting 7s OR 6s, it's still lower than the percentage of As!

    Now please tell me, is it reasonable to offer one person AAA, whilst offering another person 40 points with 777 at HL?





    Yes, and the percentage of people getting 7s in higher maths is 5-8%. Only the strongest mathematicians take it. The strongest of the strongest mathematicians take Further Maths at IB and again the percentage of 7s are 5-8%. We need to get 7s in maths and physics for Oxbridge. Oh, and we also have to get those grades for our 4 other subjects since the offers can go up to 43.



    What I have to deal with is universities not having a clue what the IB is. My sister got an offer from Surrey of 30 points with 7s in her highers. When she told them she was predicted 7s in her highers they looked at her as if it was a mediocre score. They probably thought it was out of 10. There's a reason why US colleges (who properly understand the IB) allow IB students achieving 7s in their highers to graduate in 3 years as opposed to 4.
    As for the percentages, I think that it is due to the fact that IB students focus on MANY subjects. It's hard to find time putting in the same amount of effort into a subject in A-levels than in the IB.
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    There's a reason why US colleges (who properly understand the IB) allow IB students achieving 7s in their highers to graduate in 3 years as opposed to 4.
    While I agree with the rest of your post, this isn't really a great argument. First year of university in the US is a mess and full of general subjects that you already cover with IB or A-Levels. In the UK where A-Levels are standard, you already graduate with your Bachelor's in 3 years as opposed to 4. It's not like they're saying "oh, you're smart because you did IB, you can graduate more quickly". It's more like "oh, you've already done this course, you don't have to repeat it"
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    What percentage of students FM at A-level? What are the numbers in thoudsands that earn an A in A-level FM or a 7 in Additional Math at IB?
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    (Original post by usa1981)
    What percentage of students FM at A-level? What are the numbers in thoudsands that earn an A in A-level FM or a 7 in Additional Math at IB?
    In 2008:

    % graded A in Further Maths at A level: 57.5 (38.9% achieved A in both Maths and Further Maths)

    % graded 7 in Further Maths at IB: 8% (same percentage for Maths HL)

    Sources:
    A level: http://www.bstubbs.co.uk/a-lev.htm
    IB: http://www.ibo.org/facts/statbulleti...alBulletin.pdf
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    In 2008:

    % graded A in Further Maths at A level: 57.5 (38.9% achieved A in both Maths and Further Maths)

    % graded 7 in Further Maths at IB: 8% (same percentage for Maths HL)

    Sources:
    A level: http://www.bstubbs.co.uk/a-lev.htm
    IB: http://www.ibo.org/facts/06statbulle...alBulletin.pdf
    Maths at A-level was taken by 64,593 pupils which means that about 28,420 pupils recieved A grades at A-level. F. Maths at A-level was taken by 9,091 pupils which means that about 5,227 pupils recieved A grades in 2008. In total 827,737 pupils took A-levels of those 64,593 took Maths which is about 12% of pupils so that 57.5% of those that take A-level Maths is about 7% of the total number of pupils. Oh, and that 38.9% is from 2003 not 2008.
    The F Maths at IB is only to SL which closer to AS-level. 105 pupils take IB F Maths and 8% recieved 7s which means that about 7 pupils.
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    Err... IB Further Math SL is not closer to AS-level... in any way.
    Further Math SL is far more difficult than Math HL. You actually take them together, so Further Maths SL is a supplement to Math HL.
    Math HL is beyond A2 Math (but not as hard as Further Maths at A-level). IB Further Maths SL, despite the "SL" name, is the equivalent of Further Maths at A-level.
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    Well when I applied to Uni they seemed to favour A levels and SQA over IB. Dundee expected me to get over 430UCAS points for Law rather than 300 (which is what the SQA and A levels were expected to get)

    However, I still made the grade but I still found it frustrating!

    If I could do it again... I'd do A Levels because I would get to do subjects that I wanted to do rather than jeprodise their grades with subjects I didn't want to do (like maths and chemistry)x
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    (Original post by usa1981)
    Maths at A-level was taken by 64,593 pupils which means that about 28,420 pupils recieved A grades at A-level. F. Maths at A-level was taken by 9,091 pupils which means that about 5,227 pupils recieved A grades in 2008. In total 827,737 pupils took A-levels of those 64,593 took Maths which is about 12% of pupils so that 57.5% of those that take A-level Maths is about 7% of the total number of pupils. Oh, and that 38.9% is from 2003 not 2008.
    The F Maths at IB is only to SL which closer to AS-level. 105 pupils take IB F Maths and 8% recieved 7s which means that about 7 pupils.
    Raw numbers don't matter - percentages do. I don't understand what point you're trying to make here by saying that 7% of the total number of people taking A levels got As in maths when the vast majority didn't even take maths. From the statistics I can say with utmost confidence that it's easier to get As in A level maths and further maths than it is to get in IB maths.

    The strikingly low number of people taking further maths at IB is due to the sheer difficulty of the course. IB FM is not like AS FM - it's more like first year undergraduate level maths. It takes all of the option topics from maths HL and adds on some geometry.

    Anyway, there will be mixed views, inevitably. We've just gotta deal with whatever we have...
 
 
 

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