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    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    Anyway, my French tutor said the reason for PS doing better than SS is because teachers try and work at PS because they know that the kids would behave because then Daddy will send them to the scary, monster SS.
    Do you not think it might rather be something to do with not having to deal with inane questions like, "Why does 1+1=2?"? :dry:
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    I went to a state school. Given the chance, I dare say I would have gone to a private school but tbh I don't think it makes a vast amount of difference.
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    ah, the great annual tsr private/state debate.


    'hai, st8 skl gives U m0re life experience an ting and you meet more than 1 kind ov person and you learn abt da real world and you learn 2 bare communicate wif all kinds of peeple and you hav 2 work more hard bcoz you dunt get spoon fed and priv8 pupils arnt prepared 4 lyf and der rents r buying their education an dey wont survive in da real world!11'

    basically sums up most of the posts up to this point.

    thank god you are all too lazy to cast your ballots.
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    I'm at a private school, I doubt that there is much difference academically with a good state school, although my local state school was in special measures. The real edge is the extra curricular stuff, although that's negated by the fact that it leaves you socially retarded.

    Stayed for sixth form and hated it though, it's so suffocating, you still get treated like a child even though you don't even have to be there and you get even more socially retarded. Wish I went to a state sixth form.
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    I laugh at all the people from state schools who believe that everyone in private education has to be immensely posh.

    Hahahahahahahahaha
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    Woo, woo, go state schools!
    I really think that private schools are outdated institutions ...

    While I don't mean to offend those who go to private schools, I do think that the idea of them is a bit elitist in that only those who have the cash can go.
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    State. I would never set foot in a private school.
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    (Original post by katierattray)
    I think state schools are a better place for learning how to cope in the real world, I went to state school and it didnt do me anyharm, I wouldnt of wanted to go to private school. I dont think that a state school can be blamed for bad grades, I think that you can get good grades in any school if you put the work in.
    I TOTALLY agree! I had the choice when I picked my secondary school, and I chose to go to a state school. Public schools CAN not always give the privately educated an idea that they are better, I know many people whom this is the case with, but I know a few who aren't. I am academic, but the life experience one gets from a state school is MASSIVE and gives you an idea of real life. I'm predicted 19 A*s (this includes two Btec distinctions), so it shows if you put the work in, State schools are fine!
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    i have been in private schools all my life so i don't know anything about state schools
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    (Original post by Demitrarose)
    I TOTALLY agree! I had the choice when I picked my secondary school, and I chose to go to a state school. Public schools CAN not always give the privately educated an idea that they are better, I know many people whom this is the case with, but I know a few who aren't. I am academic, but the life experience one gets from a state school is MASSIVE and gives you an idea of real life. I'm predicted 19 A*s (this includes two Btec distinctions), so it shows if you put the work in, State schools are fine!
    wtf.... 19 O levels???? bro give me some...
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    I was privately educated when still living in the UK, and went into a private school for the last part of 7th Grade and all of 8th Grade when we moved to the US, but my high school is an academically selective public [state] one. Actually they don't even call it a high school, they call it a college prep, so basically it's a public [state] school that acts like it's a private one. Another example is, the class sizes are just as small as you'd find in a private school, and much smaller than you'd find in other public [state] high schools in the US.

    However, even though it's publicly funded, parents have to pay class orientation fees, and fees for examinations etc and other things. So despite the fact it's publicly funded, parents often end up shelling out at least $1,000 per year (especially if, like me, their children take lots of AP courses in a year!), and obviously this means the children who attend the school are from families who would otherwise go private. In fact, as I posted in another thread just a few minutes ago, parents try to get their children into this school to save on private fees, but if their children don't get in they'll go private. My parents tried this with my brothers, but they didn't get in, so my brothers were educated privately.

    Focussing back on UK schools, there is no doubt there are some excellent state schools, but if I were a parent and had the money to do so, I would be sending my children to private school and this is mainly due to class size. I think class size is the one thing that lets most state schools down. How can one teacher adequately meet the needs of 30 (or if not more) pupils?
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    private school peeps r stuck up innit
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    I'm so bored of these private vs state threads, they happen all the time.

    I went to private school for 15 years of my life. The one and only year I went to state school I failed everything. It was awful, but I did like the big range of subjects they provide, as opposed to the straight academic subjects you find in a private school.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    I'm not sure you said what you meant there.



    Why is this important? (P.S. I went to a state school and I didn't.)



    As quoted, this is meaningless.
    It's like people saying thank god your (state school students) too lazy to go and vote. Which to me is very snobby and although isn't every private students opinions i do think there is at least a significant minority with that attitude.

    Why is it important to meet people from different walks of life? To make you a more understanding of people who don't have money and it will help you understand why some people don't try as hard as others at school. It may also help to give you a sense of perspective at times.

    Why is it meaningless? A levels are just the means to get to a degree so surely it's pretty significant that disadvantaged children are more likely to do better at university.
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    (Original post by 300mg)
    Well, imagine an Oxford potential maths student being taught alongside someone struggling to maintain a low D. The class has to be tailored to the students and if the students are poles apart it makes teaching near impossible.
    Actually, there is no research to suggest that splitting up abilities helps with people learning its just what people think will make sense so that is why it is used. Infact, here is research that suggest the opposite http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=20972112
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    Private school i went to did offer a very good level of education. I do agree with others that it is up to the pupil to get the grades so it shouldnt matter hugely if its state or private. Private can get the best out of people in some areas however. Main problem with private was that each year group is not very diverse, and as pupils come from all around to go to the school the chances of having a significant number of local friends is much lower, so socially a state school would be better for that.
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    (Original post by Murray Hewitt)
    As pupils come from all around to go to the school the chances of having a significant number of local friends is much lower, so socially a state school would be better for that.
    I have to agree with this point. All of my friends live ages away meaning that organising something is hard, as well as meaning that you can't do things often and so I become bored at home a lot of the time.
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    I went to a state primary school and for the first two years of secondary school. Now, I'm in my 3rd of 4 years at my private secondary school.

    Firstly, I can notice a big difference.

    The attitude of the school, the behaviour of the pupils is remarkable at private schools. But you don't get a school full of poshies - most of them aren't even that posh. But you get better teaching because everyone listens and there is less distraction.

    The reason I moved was because my state school was doing ******** to improve my grades and I had to sort of study at home to keep myself on top. But when I moved to private, my grades shot up. They give you more homework; which is good because it keeps you on the ball. I recieved 6 A's and 2 B's in my prelims last year and hopefully around the same grades come August the 5th.

    There is also a vast amount of extra cirricular activities such as: God you name it, like archery, golf, skiing, chess, windsurfing, rowing, cricket, rugby, choreography, drama, debating, CCF... literally tons.
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    I say we need more grammar schools in the state system. There is only 163 now and so very competitive to get in.
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    You can call me hovis, I've been to the best of both.

    Grammar and Private for secondary.
    and both private and state for primary.
 
 
 
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