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    well then why is recognised as an eating disorder on the eating disorders assocation(now beat) website?
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    (Original post by xxhoneyxx04)
    well then why is recognised as an eating disorder on the eating disorders assocation(now beat) website?
    Perhaps because much like Bulimia nervosa, Anorexia nervosa Pica, Prader-Willi Syndrome, Night Eating Syndrome, Sleep Eating Disorder (SED-NOS), Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), Orthorexia Nervosa, Bigorexia – and any misc I have missed are eating disorders – NOT MEDICAL CONDITIONS!!!!!!!!

    Eating disorders are based upon a perceived cognitive relationship to food, be it control, residual body image and so on.

    The treatment of which is cognitively based making the person ‘un-learn’ the behaviour or to apply a healthier behaviour to that feeling whatever it may be.

    The only ‘medication’ applied to these sort of things are things to reduce appetite for the fatties, or to provoke a feeling of nausea in relation to the feeling making it an uncomfortable one and causing the candidate to seek alternate though process to avoid this.
    However, none of this is absolutely necessary and it is entirely possible to overcome a learned behaviour without any medication.

    Compare this to say for example Cancer, Diabetes, being stabbed in the throat etc – conditions where the chemicals in the body have to be controlled, antibodies applied or operations performed to prevent death, bit of a blooming difference to weak willed people!
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    You should binge eat protein and go to the gym. You'd get great life-changing results.
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    Try to figure out what your "trigger" food is.

    You might think that everything is,
    but seriously..think about it. There must be some kind of food items that make you go on a binge

    Maybe yours is= -Chocolate OR -Bread OR -Biscuits. OR something else.

    If possible, try to avoid eating your trigger food,
    Even if you eat only a little bit of it, it will set you off on a binge.
    You know this is true.

    You can eat ANYTHING else because other stuff doesn't make you go on a binge.
    • #6
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    No it is not!!

    A medical condition is where there is a "medical" reason for the condition such as bi polar where there is a chemical imbalance in the brain controllable only by ‘medication’

    BED is a cognitive learnt behaviour and as such is not medical in the slightest!!!!

    I love the ignorant this and that when these people are ignorant to what is bloomin what it the medical world.
    Surely you could just as easily say that bipolar disorder is an excuse for being moody? I'm aware that this really isn't the case and that such an idea would be extremely offensive to people suffering from it and their friends and family, but that's exactly what you're saying to the OP. And if you really don't believe in the problem she's describing (assuming the OP is a she), why don't you just get out of this thread and let her get support from more compassionate people?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Surely you could just as easily say that bipolar disorder is an excuse for being moody? I'm aware that this really isn't the case and that such an idea would be extremely offensive to people suffering from it and their friends and family, but that's exactly what you're saying to the OP. And if you really don't believe in the problem she's describing (assuming the OP is a she), why don't you just get out of this thread and let her get support from more compassionate people?
    Bi Polar is a chemical imbalance at its root, as such it is
    A: A registered and recognised by the medical world
    B: Controllable through the use of chemicals to balance the chemicals out of sync much like diabetes

    so it is not similar to a learnt behaviour in the slightest
    • #6
    #6

    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    Bi Polar is a chemical imbalance at its root, as such it is
    A: A registered and recognised by the medical world
    B: Controllable through the use of chemicals to balance the chemicals out of sync much like diabetes

    so it is not similar to a learnt behaviour in the slightest
    But what makes you so sure that the OP's problem is a "learnt behaviour"?

    And even if we were to assume that it was, it's still something that makes the OP unhappy, so what exactly are you going to achieve by telling her she's just a pathetic excuse for a human and should just stop "shovelling food"? Even if there were nothing wrong with her at all except that she likes to eat, that would be a horrible and counter-productive thing to say.
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    Perhaps because much like Bulimia nervosa, Anorexia nervosa Pica, Prader-Willi Syndrome, Night Eating Syndrome, Sleep Eating Disorder (SED-NOS), Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), Orthorexia Nervosa, Bigorexia – and any misc I have missed are eating disorders – NOT MEDICAL CONDITIONS!!!!!!!!

    Eating disorders are based upon a perceived cognitive relationship to food, be it control, residual body image and so on.

    The treatment of which is cognitively based making the person ‘un-learn’ the behaviour or to apply a healthier behaviour to that feeling whatever it may be.

    The only ‘medication’ applied to these sort of things are things to reduce appetite for the fatties, or to provoke a feeling of nausea in relation to the feeling making it an uncomfortable one and causing the candidate to seek alternate though process to avoid this.
    However, none of this is absolutely necessary and it is entirely possible to overcome a learned behaviour without any medication.

    Compare this to say for example Cancer, Diabetes, being stabbed in the throat etc – conditions where the chemicals in the body have to be controlled, antibodies applied or operations performed to prevent death, bit of a blooming difference to weak willed people!

    Although I agree this is most likely the case, it is by no means a fact.

    In the case of anorexia nervosa, many studies have linked the disorder to an imbalance of serotonin, which would indeed make it a so-called medical condition. Especially when you take into account the heritability of the disorder and the concordance in monozygotic twins, there is certainly a strong suggestion this disorder is more than 'just' cognitive.

    Prader-Willi syndrome, which is another you mentioned, is a genetic disorder and not an eating disorder at all! Yes, it affects the person's ability to regulate their appetite, amongst other symptoms, but this does not make it an eating disorder and this compulsive hunger is most certainly not due to a poor cognitive relationship with food.

    There are other examples, but I hope this illustrates a point; i.e. that I happen to think your medical knowledge is a bit sketchy. :rolleyes:

    While I'm at it, I don't see how your frankly confrontational attitude is at all helpful to the OP. Admitting any sort of eating disorder is an extremely difficult thing to do, and I happen to think it would only be a good thing if people got the help they needed for this sort of thing. Getting the response of being called a 'fattie' and 'weak-willed' is not only close-minded but may only make her fear the response she'd get from a medical professional or indeed anyone else she happens to tell. Even if she was obese (which she isn't) and disorder-free (which again, she isn't) I don't think your comments could be at all useful in any sense.

    ...Also, eating disorders are 'medical conditions' by definition, even if they arguably have no physical basis.
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    (Original post by JustCallMeKate)
    Although I agree this is most likely the case, it is by no means a fact.

    In the case of anorexia nervosa, many studies have linked the disorder to an imbalance of serotonin, which would indeed make it a so-called medical condition. Especially when you take into account the heritability of the disorder and the concordance in monozygotic twins, there is certainly a strong suggestion this disorder is more than 'just' cognitive.

    Prader-Willi syndrome, which is another you mentioned, is a genetic disorder and not an eating disorder at all! Yes, it affects the person's ability to regulate their appetite, amongst other symptoms, but this does not make it an eating disorder and this compulsive hunger is most certainly not due to a poor cognitive relationship with food.

    There are other examples, but I hope this illustrates a point; i.e. that I happen to think your medical knowledge is a bit sketchy.

    While I'm at it, I don't see how your frankly confrontational attitude is at all helpful to the OP. Admitting any sort of eating disorder is an extremely difficult thing to do, and I happen to think it would only be a good thing if people got the help they needed for this sort of thing. Getting the response of being called a 'fattie' and 'weak-willed' is not only close-minded but may only make her fear the response she'd get from a medical professional or indeed anyone else she happens to tell. Even if she was obese (which she isn't) and disorder-free (which again, she isn't) I don't think your comments could be at all useful in any sense.

    ...Also, eating disorders are 'medical conditions' by definition, even if they arguably have no physical basis.
    Prader-Willi syndrome granted, and it should not have been in the list, it was as you may have guessed a copy and paste jobby - this is also true of anything else similar.

    Anorexia however is an interesting one, yes there are suggested links but there has been no conclusive evidence, the primary reason for this as you may well know is that food contributes towards the regulation of chemicals in the mind, the mind itself being accountable for around 20% (on average) of the kcals consumed.
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    Prader-Willi syndrome granted, and it should not have been in the list, it was as you may have guessed a copy and paste jobby - this is also true of anything else similar.

    Anorexia however is an interesting one, yes there are suggested links but there has been no conclusive evidence, the primary reason for this as you may well know is that food contributes towards the regulation of chemicals in the mind, the mind itself being accountable for around 20% (on average) of the kcals consumed.

    I agree with that. The main finding seems to be that anorexics have abnormally high levels of serotonin, which causes a lack of apetite. Still, starvation studies carried out during World War II seemed to suggest starving alone causes high levels of serotonin, meaning that a causal relationship is difficult to establish.

    Still, my point wasn't that there was a definite physical cause for anorexia, only that there might be, and so saying that 'eating disorders just arise from an abnormal cognitive relationship with food' as you said earlier (or something similar), isn't true. There simply aren't any facts as far as the causes of eating disorders are concerned. In fact, I could go as far as to say there are no facts as far as the causes of any mental illnesses are concerned.

    Even bipolar disorder, as you mentioned earlier in the thread, isn't as cut and dry as you made out. Medications given to bipolar sufferers arguably only act to 'dampen' moods down and are by no means a magical cure or indeed treatment. In fact, all drug courses come (or should come) with a course of therapy designed to tackle other causes of the illness and so it's hardly a simple case of giving someone a few drugs and them bouncing back.

    To drag this back on topic, I'll admit I don't know all that much about BED, it's hardly the most studied of all the eating disorders. Still, if there are doubts about the causes of everything to do with the mind, you can't simply assume the OP can 'just stop shovelling food' as easily as that. The same way I'd be shocked if anyone told an anorexic to 'get over it and just eat' or someone with depression to 'just cheer up'. Of course, these are the end results, you'd hope someone with BED would eventually control their binging, an anorexic would eat normally and someone to control their low moods with depression, but you can't just snap out of these things.

    People need support in some form of to overcome these issues.
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    Could we maybe take the arguments as to whether BED/COE is a medical condition to a different thread, so that Anonymous can get the support s/he has asked for rather than be battered with debates?

    Anonymous, I'm really sorry about what you've had people say in this thread, BED is really difficult to cope with, as is any disorder. I used to have problems with binging in the context of mild bulimia, and I saw a dietician who helped me to get an idea of normal eating, if you like I could type up the mean plan they gave me for you, it may not help or it may be too much right now, but I found by having a structured routine to my eating really helped me to take control. Also distractiosn are really good for binges, rather than aim not to have one at all, when things are quite bad like now, try to just stave off the binge for ten more minutes, and finish one or two items earlier than you usually would.
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    Hang in there and ask your GP to refer you to a counsellor. People don't eat to the point of distress because they don't have "willpower"- that is ludicrous. Eating a few biscuits too many may be about greed (although frankly I see nothing wrong with eating what you want & I don't understand why our society has made this a moral issue), but out-and-out bingeing is the sign of a deeper emotional problem.

    I have suffered eating disorders across the spectrum (mainly anorexia but I've had spells with bulimia/BED) and I know it's about more than willpower or being a "greedy fatty".

    And I don't understand powerlifter's implication that a behavioural problem is somehow simple to get rid of. I think he underestimates the psychological grip these behaviours can have on a person. I'd also be interested in how he believes these behaviours/cognitions arise, if not through some neurological basis since ALL of our cognitions have a neurological basis.

    Try not to let the ignorance get to you.
 
 
 
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