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What is it like to live outside of London? watch

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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    No, I don't know what 'that feeling of detachment' is or what it has to do with a 'fear of crime'.


    Have you never been to any big city other than London? :confused: I don't see how London is any different from any other big city in terms of crime or friendliness or 'detachment'. I imagine all this London-phobia is really just big-city-phobia from people who have never really strayed from small towns.
    There is a feeling of detachment in london because no one wnats to know or talk to strangers, that is partly down to a fear of crime.

    As I have said I go to London regularly. + been all over the UK and live in a fairly large city.

    Big cities like Sydney, Hong Kong and others within the UK are not as bad as London for what I describe IMO.

    Maybe you are just ignorant to it? I mean its pretty well known that most people on the tube wouldn't want to piss on you if you were on fire.
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    (Original post by Melz0r)
    Oh, it's horrible. I live in a mud village, we get up every morning at 5 to go down to the water pump. Every so often a man on a horse and cart comes and brings us some news of what's happened in the Great Capital, and our hearts all yearn, and we all pray to the spirits that some great fortune will shine on us and give us a chance to move there.
    Lolz.
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    London is super-detached as Clubber Lang says. I was making the same point on another thread. London's become like an American city. No sense of community or commonality. A similar thing is happening in other UK cities but not on the same scale.

    Everyone tends to converge on London, including British people from outside London and immigrants. Because of this, there is no common identity. 'Londoner' is a VERY broad title. People are now starting to seriously examine this polarization thats going on in London. Now you've got your Somalian areas, your black Christian areas, your jewish areas...

    They've been witnessing this massive polarization for much longer in American cities. The whole history of American cities is rapid demographic change.
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    (Original post by Clubber Lang)
    There is a feeling of detachment in london because no one wnats to know or talk to strangers, that is partly down to a fear of crime.

    As I have said I go to London regularly. + been all over the UK and live in a fairly large city.

    Big cities like Sydney, Hong Kong and others within the UK are not as bad as London for what I describe IMO.

    Maybe you are just ignorant to it? I mean its pretty well known that most people on the tube wouldn't want to piss on you if you were on fire.
    What big cities have you been to?
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    (Original post by indigoblue)
    London is super-detached as Clubber Lang says. I was making the same point on another thread. London's become like an American city. No sense of community or commonality. A similar thing is happening in other UK cities but not on the same scale.

    Everyone tends to converge on London, including British people from outside London and immigrants. Because of this, there is no common identity. 'Londoner' is a VERY broad title. People are now starting to seriously examine this polarization thats going on in London. Now you've got your Somalian areas, your black Christian areas, your jewish areas...

    They've been witnessing this massive polarization for much longer in American cities. The whole history of American cities is rapid demographic change.
    The polarization and segregation is nothing new. Tower Hamlets didn't need Bangladeshi immigrants to become the part of London where poor people settled. It had been like that for 2 centuries before. London has never been seen as one united City anyway, but more as a grouping of boroughs/villages.

    The whole concept of the Greater London authority is only a decade old if I'm not mistaken. So, there are certain developments going in the other direction: the idea that there is indeed one big London city.

    You must also not forget that London is one of the most spread out cities in the world. It's hard to keep unity over such a large space. If you compare to Paris which also has a population of just under 10 million when you count the whole metropolitan area/agglomeration, the two cities are setup entirely differently. Whereas London is just the addition of boroughs sitting side by side within the M25, with no real core (unless you want to count the Borough of Westminster and the City as the core) whereas Paris is a very small city geographically with suburbs that spread out for miles and miles
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    There's nothing but sheep and rolling green hills outside of London
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    The polarization and segregation is nothing new. Tower Hamlets didn't need Bangladeshi immigrants to become the part of London where poor people settled. It had been like that for 2 centuries before. London has never been seen as one united City anyway, but more as a grouping of boroughs/villages.

    The whole concept of the Greater London authority is only a decade old if I'm not mistaken. So, there are certain developments going in the other direction: the idea that there is indeed one big London city.

    You must also not forget that London is one of the most spread out cities in the world. It's hard to keep unity over such a large space. If you compare to Paris which also has a population of just under 10 million when you count the whole metropolitan area/agglomeration, the two cities are setup entirely differently. Whereas London is just the addition of boroughs sitting side by side within the M25, with no real core (unless you want to count the Borough of Westminster and the City as the core) whereas Paris is a very small city geographically with suburbs that spread out for miles and miles
    The polarization is pretty new actually. Mass immigration to London is fairly new, and in the past it was almost exclusively European. London isn't New York or Boston, which were basically built by immigrants from other continents.

    London has never been more segregated or polarized as it is now. No city is totally united, but London is an example of a very fragmented city. The problem isn't geographical, its more communal and social.
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    (Original post by Stettin)
    By that I mean atleast 30 minutes commute away.

    I'm a London boy and I have been so for a very long time. I've been to Slough which funnily isn't has bad as people think it is. It's WORSE!

    However my exposure to areas outside London has been limited. Been to Milton Kenyes and Nottingham for a day and didn't see much to make my mind up.

    How do you guys feel about all the focus that London gets nationally and internationally. For many UK = London. Is it rural up there? More quite? More Chavs? More white?

    Also looking at statistics. London contributes more the United Kingdom then Scotland,Wales or Northern Ireland in terms of population and size of the economy. Are these places more poor? There are many areas in London that are poor and very rich but I would say most places are kind of in the middle. Also what is up with the accent? Some people up north have accents that I just can't understand.
    You really don't need us to answer a lot of these questions. Surely most of this information you would pick up from just watching TV, reading books/newspapers and going on the internet?
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    (Original post by indigoblue)
    The polarization is pretty new actually. Mass immigration to London is fairly new, and in the past it was almost exclusively European. London isn't New York or Boston, which were basically built by immigrants from other continents.
    People believe that polarization is new because they don't look further than the obvious i.e. race. I'm sorry but no matter what you may think, a lot more separates a Tower Hamlets white person from a Kensington equivalent than from a Tower Hamlets Bangladeshi. There have always been clear distinction between boroughs and different parts of these according to income and class.
    All that has happened is that these recent immigrants have fitted into the fragmented structure of London that already existed.

    I remember someone writing an article in a newspaper about the mass immigration of Poles to Hammersmith creating a "Little Poland". Unfortunately the poor guy hadn't realised that Hammersmith had been a destination for Polish and Irish immigrants since the 30s and 40s.

    Being an East Londoner and being fairly knowledgeable of the history of the area, it amuses me when people think that there was a time not that long ago when London was not as fragmented. Read a bit about the history of Whitechapel, the Docklands... that whole part of London did not identify one bit with the rest of London.
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    (Original post by Stettin)
    Also looking at statistics. London contributes more the United Kingdom then Scotland,Wales or Northern Ireland in terms of population and size of the economy. Are these places more poor? There are many areas in London that are poor and very rich but I would say most places are kind of in the middle. Also what is up with the accent? Some people up north have accents that I just can't understand.
    Darn sarf mate, darn sarrrffff. Apples and pears, rub a dub-dub me ol' china.
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    I'd much rather go and live in london

    just 3 weeks :excited:
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    (Original post by Stettin)
    By that I mean atleast 30 minutes commute away.

    I'm a London boy and I have been so for a very long time. I've been to Slough which funnily isn't has bad as people think it is. It's WORSE!

    However my exposure to areas outside London has been limited. Been to Milton Kenyes and Nottingham for a day and didn't see much to make my mind up.

    How do you guys feel about all the focus that London gets nationally and internationally. For many UK = London. Is it rural up there? More quite? More Chavs? More white?

    Also looking at statistics. London contributes more the United Kingdom then Scotland,Wales or Northern Ireland in terms of population and size of the economy. Are these places more poor? There are many areas in London that are poor and very rich but I would say most places are kind of in the middle. Also what is up with the accent? Some people up north have accents that I just can't understand.
    (Original post by Stettin)
    I'm a posh London snob. Anything outside of London is NON-EXISTANT in my mind, or at least not worthy to think about. I love how we are so technologically advanced compared to the tiny villages scattered across the UK. Blah blah blah, blah blah blah blah blah.
    Corrected your original post for you.
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    All i can say OP is that Life is tough.

    .. By the way what's it like to meet the Queen?
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    What's with all the London hate??????? the OP has lived in london his whole life and wants to know how life is outside. sounds fair to me. and before you start arguing - life is definitely a lot different. other than the greater mix of people, there is also the transport issue (my family doesn't own a car - we use public transport or cabs), the sort of jobs people have, and the quality/price of living.

    so stop hating on this guy for asking an honest question
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    Depends where you go. Around wales and scotland, people are more laid back, social and friendly with a nice accent to boot
    Around the north England are the inbetweeners, less peer-pressure, more time to socialise, less of the mcdonald's every 5miles of walking and more of breath taking scenary. It's almost like a fairytale down warwickshire.

    South England enjoys the seaside surroundings and partial influences of the capital. The capital is hardly a representation of what UK is really like.
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    OP you realise Slough is just 15 minutes from London?

    I would imagine large parts of this island would be pretty much 100% white with some shockingly backward views. The rest of the country is a bit crap to stay more than a few days, certainly nowhere else other than London and its surrounding actually worth living in.
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    (Original post by ChosenOne)
    OP you realise Slough is just 15 minutes from London?

    I would imagine large parts of this island would be pretty much 100% white with some shockingly backward views. The rest of the country is a bit crap to stay more than a few days, certainly nowhere else other than London and its surrounding actually worth living in.
    can you give me an example of these backward views? Are they sexist?

    squish.
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    Please send food and fuel. Thanks. :yy:
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    As someone who lives on the south coast (2 hours away), it is quite quiet and people are more welcoming than Londoners. Also in m y particular area it is 95% white and there are a lot of old people. It certainly isn't poor either and the accent is just simple southern where people put 'r's into things like bath :moon:
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    Hahaha! If you're serious thats actually amazing!
 
 
 
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