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    I've been accepted for a nursing degree by Abertay Uni, and I'm due to begin the course mid-September. However, I've just received an invitation to an interview by Dundee Uni for possible entry into their nursing degree course.

    I'm now in a quandary: do I just stick to my original plan to go to Abertay, or do I go to the interview at Dundee Uni and try to get in there?

    Any advice would be appreciated. Having looked at the latest Guardian and Times Uni League Tables, now I'm slightly uneasy about Abertay. In the Guardian League Table, the Abertay Nursing degree is last on the list. Should I worry too much about this? Don't get me wrong, The Guardian is the new age Communist Manifesto, and I don't have any respect for it or have much faith in its judgement. Yet The Times, although they rated Abertay higher, it still comes out well below, for example, Dundee or Stirling.

    What I'm really trying to find out are 2 things:

    1) Do people on this forum give any heed to Uni League Tables?

    and

    2) Do employers?
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    Alot of people do give a lot of weight to a universitys league table ranking, but if you don't then don't worry about it. I'm not into nursing so i'm not sure how competitive it is, but going to a better Uni will always give you the potential edge over other candidates for things. My advice would be to go for it, I personally haven't even heard of Abertay ( although I'm sure it is very nice) and by going to the interview the worst thing that could happen is that you don't get in and have to go to the original plan anyway.
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    Abertay gives the option of doing an honours year, whereas Dundee, and my other choice, Stirling, both only allow you to do a 3 yr general degree. The interviewer at Abertay told me that obtaining honours can give you the edge with regards to employability. But then that's not much use if the employers don't rate the Uni now, is it?! lol

    I think I will go along to the interview. Do you think I should tell them I've accepted a place at Abertay but would prefer Dundee, or do you think I should keep my cards close to my chest?
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    I would go for Dundee, if I were you. You should probably let them know that you've accepted the place at Abertay.

    (Original post by Lightf00t)
    1) Do people on this forum give any heed to Uni League Tables?
    An awful lot, yes — too much, in fact.

    2) Do employers?
    The standard of your degree (first, 2:1, etc.) will be much more important than where you got it from.
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    See how the interview goes and then decide? You'd be living in the same city anyway so might as well go to the "better" uni no?
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    You should look at the Student Satisfaction Surveys before making any decision. Just because a university is top of the league it doen't mean it is top in all subjects and areas. The SSS tells you what current students feel about the course and gives you much more information than a league table ever could.
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    Honest answer - I would say that you go to the university that you get the best vibes from/prefer the look of. Because at the end of the day, nursing is a vocation in which the university you got your degree from makes absolutely no difference whatsoever. If Oxbridge did nursing, even if you had a degree from Oxford for nrsing it would be no better than a degree from somewhere like Aston or something else. At the end of the day you end up as a qualified nurse, and in none of my interviews was I even asked where I did my training just so long as I had my qualification.
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    Honest answer - I would say that you go to the university that you get the best vibes from/prefer the look of. Because at the end of the day, nursing is a vocation in which the university you got your degree from makes absolutely no difference whatsoever. If Oxbridge did nursing, even if you had a degree from Oxford for nrsing it would be no better than a degree from somewhere like Aston or something else. At the end of the day you end up as a qualified nurse, and in none of my interviews was I even asked where I did my training just so long as I had my qualification.
    Good answer. What you have just said is the impression I've had all along. The league tables, however, planted a seed of doubt in my mind.

    Where did you get your degree? And do you think doing the extra honours year has improved your prospects or how you are perceived by prospective employers?
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    (Original post by Lightf00t)
    Good answer. What you have just said is the impression I've had all along. The league tables, however, planted a seed of doubt in my mind.

    Where did you get your degree? And do you think doing the extra honours year has improved your prospects or how you are perceived by prospective employers?
    Honours is not an extra year - the (hons) is simply because I did the dissertation and 2 extra modules. It hasn't improved my immediate prospects, but if I want to go on to doing some kind of research or postgrad then having an honours degree will probably be loooked upon more favourably than just a diploma.
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    Honours is not an extra year - the (hons) is simply because I did the dissertation and 2 extra modules. It hasn't improved my immediate prospects, but if I want to go on to doing some kind of research or postgrad then having an honours degree will probably be loooked upon more favourably than just a diploma.
    I was going to say that it doesn't matter as a lot of MScs will accept people with diplomas, clinical experience and evidence of advanced studies (most people on my MSc don't have degrees).

    That said, looking at my uni's nursing-related MScs, they appear to specify second class honours degree or equivalent, so they might be moving away from that a little.
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    (Original post by swiftuk)
    I was going to say that it doesn't matter as a lot of MScs will accept people with diplomas, clinical experience and evidence of advanced studies (most people on my MSc don't have degrees).

    That said, looking at my uni's nursing-related MScs, they appear to specify second class honours degree or equivalent, so they might be moving away from that a little.
    yeh, you're right it's not 100% that you definitely need a degree to get onto further courses and stuff, but it's one less thing to worry about if you do the degree now, rather than applying for something further along the line and they tell you you can't get on with a diploma.
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    yeh, you're right it's not 100% that you definitely need a degree to get onto further courses and stuff, but it's one less thing to worry about if you do the degree now, rather than applying for something further along the line and they tell you you can't get on with a diploma.
    True enough...particularly as whilst I wouldn't want to second guess how the whole 'degree profession' for nursing will go (in terms of pace), because there are a lot more of you, perhaps you're likely to reach a critical mass of degree students quicker than AHPs in terms of postgrad education (also because there are more top-up courses around).

    NB, above is just my opinion
 
 
 
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