Turn on thread page Beta

Do you believe in greater good? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Preeka)
    I guess I do believe in the greater good because reality is stranger than fiction and we don't really always get clear cut divisions between good and evil. Sometimes, it's just a choice between 'bad' and 'worse' so you gotta do what you gotta do, imo.
    I get what you mean.. logically, ignoring all other factors, it would be best to save 2 people rather than 1 person. Even with this example, by choosing to save the 2 people, you are also choosing to let the other 1 die.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iwannabe)
    No way. I am of the opinion that no human has the right over any human life - not even his own. Saying that right and wrong are subjective opens a lot of doors for undermining morality i.e: I am totally justified to kill twin babies, as in my culture they are considered as a bad omen. a.) Who is to say this this is wrong and, b.) by what standards? (Based on a real-life example. Please google "Mary Slessor". She is the same lady featured on the Scottish £10 note).

    To live reasonable, meaningful, moral lives as human beings, we need absolutes. Absolute rights, and absolute wrongs. Obviously not every situation can be put into a box, but for a large proportion of the society, absolute rights and wrongs are essential to maintain meaningful co-habitation.

    Re: Greater good. Sometimes, nature has a way of using "small" disasters to keep our planet habitable i.e through volcanoes, landslides etc. "Nature" isn't one of us - It's a force outside our circle of influence, and thus is not bound by our senses of morality etc. Hence, "natural" actions carried out "for a greater good" are completely justified. However, us pawns should have no right to judge between who lives and who dies, and who should benefit from who's death. If we think we do, then why don't we volunteer to die "for the greater good" (Without taking other unconsenting, innocent individuals along, of course).
    Isn't this what religion has done? The 10 commandments are absolute.
    However, it is near impossible to live your life without doing 1 thing that is deemed as absolutely wrong.. and this would also hinder free will.

    Also, we can predict when natural disasters will occur with reasonable accuracy. Are you saying it is unnatural to do so and we should let whatever will happen, happen?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kevtp)
    Isn't this what religion has done? The 10 commandments are absolute.
    However, it is near impossible to live your life without doing 1 thing that is deemed as absolutely wrong.. and this would also hinder free will.

    Also, we can predict when natural disasters will occur with reasonable accuracy. Are you saying it is unnatural to do so and we should let whatever will happen, happen?
    But I've said absolutely nothing about religion, but be my guest. Any follower of Christ's teachings will tell you that the 10 commandments were not placed to set impossible standards for humans to meet, but to sentitize our consciences to how bad "bad things" really are. Take stealing for example - We might try to justify stealing by saying "We're only taking that which has been owed to us" or "We're making the most of our opportunities" but deep down, we know that we are wrongly taking what does not rightly belong to us, and feel a need to justify this action. I'm sure that this "knowledge" exists even in the unexplored tribes of Papa New Guinea who have never come across a Bible or heard any of its teachings.

    Forseeing natural disasters is not the problem. In fact it would be utterly selfish, callous and stupid to forsee a natural catastrophe and not use the means within our reach to save others (i.e evacuation etc). What I'm saying is that the events themselves are not within our power. As far as I know, I don't think any human can stop a hurricane - we can only study it. And there's nothing wrong in studying, and using the knowledge that we have gained to the benefit of our fellow human beings. We cannot stop a hurricane (Sometimes it must happen in order to promote the survival of phytoplankton in "ocean deserts", which in turn sustain aquatic creatures, and also help to reduce greenhouse gases created by Yours Truly), but we can be sensible and do what we can to stay out of it's path, and also warn others to do the same. It is better for towns to be rebuilt (and we know they can), than for the whole of Earth to depreciate and die.

    When "nature" decides, it is probably fair even when we have not advanced to the level where we can wholly understand the reasons, processes and effects involved. Can we say the same for when humans decide?



 
 
 
Poll
Is the Big Bang theory correct?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.