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    Is the current Labour party 'New Labour' or are they reverting to more traditional Labour policies? And is this one reason for the party's decline?

    Is the 'new' Conservative party just New Labour?
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    "New" parties are irritating on either side, they're losing their core values and just merging into one big pile of ******** with a terrifying "friendly" grin.
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    (Original post by mikeytk)
    Is the current Labour party 'New Labour' or are they reverting to more traditional Labour policies? And is this one reason for the party's decline?

    Is the 'new' Conservative party just New Labour?
    Are they?

    If anything, I'd say with the rise of young career MPs and the fall of the old guard, Old Labour is in mortal peril, not New.

    When Labour start nationalising industry and utilities, start fighting for the working class, ask us to withdraw from the EU and stop infringing on civil liberties, then I'll know New Labour (aka friendly Toryism) is dead.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Are they?

    If anything, I'd say with the rise of young career MPs and the fall of the old guard, Old Labour is in mortal peril, not New.

    When Labour start nationalising industry and utilities, start fighting for the working class, ask us to withdraw from the EU and stop infringing on civil liberties, then I'll know New Labour (aka friendly Toryism) is dead.
    I agree with almost everything you said. From the reactions people seem to think that the questions I asked are my views. They are not, I'm just inviting responses.

    Is membership of the EU against traditional Labour values?
    I don't see how.
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    (Original post by mikeytk)
    I agree with almost everything you said. From the reactions people seem to think that the questions I asked are my views. They are not, I'm just inviting responses.

    Is membership of the EU against traditional Labour values?
    I don't see how.
    In 1983 Labour wanted us to leave the EEC, because that and it's subsequent reincarnation, the monstrosity that is the EU, are fundementally un-socialist and are thus contrary to traditional Labour values.

    Michael Foot: the best Prime Minister Britain never had
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    In 1983 Labour wanted us to leave the EEC, because that and it's subsequent reincarnation, the monstrosity that is the EU, are fundementally un-socialist and are thus contrary to traditional Labour values.
    In what way is it unsocialist? I consider myself a socialist on most issues but I'm afraid I must veer from the socialist line on this issue if it is the case. Had a quick google but can't find much?
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    (Original post by mikeytk)
    In what way is it unsocialist? I consider myself a socialist on most issues but I'm afraid I must veer from the socialist line on this issue if it is the case. Had a quick google but can't find much?
    This sums up my opinion quite well:

    http://www.socialistparty.org.uk/key...ialist/EU/7292
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    This sums up my opinion quite well:

    http://www.socialistparty.org.uk/key...ialist/EU/7292
    Hmm, very interesting thanks. I still must say, I think the EU is good for Britain and for me that's more important than if it's a socialist concept or not.
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    I think we're moving towards a period of Euroscepticism within the electorate - shown with the strong results for UKIP and the Tories and poor results for the pro-EU parties. If Labour survives the next election as political force, then I think they will move towards Euroscepticism in line with the electorate.

    I think also Labour will probably shift more to the left and try and reinvent themselves into an ideological Social Democrat party with someone like David Miliband who is well versed in Marxism and Social Democracy at its head. It depends on the outcome of the next election, but the seats the Tories are likely to take are the ones held by New Labour MPs as it was New Labour that lured floating voters away from the Tories in the first place.

    Personally, I hope Labour face political annihilation in the next election and the Liberal Democrats replaces them as the opposition. Socialism/Social Democracy failed and I hope it never comes back! Britain's future in my view ought to lay between liberalism and conservatism.
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    I think a move towards Old Labour-style democratic socialism is ill-advised. Think of it, there is no popular wish for policies used in the post-war years to be brought back. People still remember how the old post-war consensus failed in the 1970's, so for this reason people are generally happy to keep the Thatcherite status quo.

    i think Labour, after the election, next year, should just bide their time, regroup and make their case at the next election. the Tories would only win next year because people are pissed off with Labour, not because people see them as a credible alternative.

    If the economy remains stagnant for much of the Tories' first term (which may happen to most developed countries), then surely people would get start to turn off them. It would be Cameron's job to ease the recovery in the economy, and if the recovery is not strong, then would people tolerate 8/9/10% unemployment for four or five years?
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    The "new" prefix only means the party is moving towards the political centre to gain more votes.
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    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    I think a move towards Old Labour-style democratic socialism is ill-advised. Think of it, there is no popular wish for policies used in the post-war years to be brought back. People still remember how the old post-war consensus failed in the 1970's, so for this reason people are generally happy to keep the Thatcherite status quo.

    i think Labour, after the election, next year, should just bide their time, regroup and make their case at the next election. the Tories would only win next year because people are pissed off with Labour, not because people see them as a credible alternative.

    If the economy remains stagnant for much of the Tories' first term (which may happen to most developed countries), then surely people would get start to turn off them. It would be Cameron's job to ease the recovery in the economy, and if the recovery is not strong, then would people tolerate 8/9/10% unemployment for four or five years?
    If Labour is pinning its hopes on unemployment figures then all hope is lost. The Tories won four elections with unemployment records that were the highest in post-War history. Believe me, I think people's tolerance for unemployment is higher than you imagine.
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    Maybe so. But the government has to ensure a healthy recovery, and if the economy is stagnant for some time, who is to say people would tolerate it?

    The fact people tolerated high unemployment before, well that is a different generation. We used to have class based voting decades ago, but we do not now as such, so times and voting behaviour can change.
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    The people want change, but at the moment all three main parties are following the Thatcherite line and not offering that change. The Tories aren't going to abandon Thatcherism, albeit centrist style Thatcherism, whilst the Lib Dems have always occupied the centre ground and can't offer any drastic change, so it lies with the Labour Party to offer that change, and they can't do it under New Labour, they must for the most part abandon Thatcherism and return to basics and return to their roots, to help the workers and the forgotten members of society and show the general public of all walks of life, not just either the working or middle class, but everyone, that there is a party who can change things. So yes, I believe, for the good of British democracy by creating some choice in parliament, that New Labour is dead and Labour will change.
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    I certainly hope nu-Labour are dead. I can't stand their authoritarian streak and retarded policies.
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    we need a government thats got a clear stateable vision for the country, not ad hoc rambling.
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    It's dead when people stop using the phrase.
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    I never write "New" when referring to Labour; always "Nu".

    I personally know of one Labour candidate here in St Helens. I met him and was not very impressed by his manner. Now he has defected to the Lib Dems. But before he was with Labour he was a Torry. Goes to show that there really is no difference between any of the main parties, and that people just jump from one party to the other party in the hope that the grass will be greener on the other side; that things will be different.

    This proved to me not so long ago that the British political system is rigged and is a sham. There's no real choice. There's no freedom to choose. The British people are divided between those that vote and those that don't vote. The former like sheep. The latter with their eyes opened.
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    (Original post by yeahm8justhavina****)
    It's dead when people stop using the phrase.
    Touche...
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    Is New Labour dead?

    I bloody hope so.

    Brown's making this country more and more like Zimbabwe everyday.
 
 
 
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