Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My friends' been lying loads and pretended I'm their employer, but whenever I get a call from people asking if I know them, I always go "wut"?

    Know your lie. Brainwash yourself so much you'll believe it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Ruthless. Not the way to a happy life..
    I'm not saying I'd outright lie, but I don't think about other people who might want the job, because I need the money myself.

    If that means slightly exaggerating things that is fine to me, if it means flirting with the bar manager that is also fine, if it means being favoured because the manager knows my boyfriends parents I'm not going to complain about that either.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Please don't lie OP. Just get some proper work experience. There is a chance you could be caught out.
    Not if the partner who runs the business agrees to play along
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Ruthless. Not the way to a happy life..
    Some industries financially reward ruthlessness. Happiness isn't always achieved via the singular route of always being honest, after all not everyone feels guilt to the same degree as others.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    If the person who encouraged you to lie is willing to vouch for you you'll probably get away with it, but I still don't know if it's particularly sensible. If this imaginary work experience is relevant to the job you're applying for, people might want to know what exactly you did there and how any skills you picked up would help you in your new job. Just adding a line on your CV won't help you with that, unless you're willing to make up a lot of back story which could very easily get you caught in a big mess. If it's not relevant to the job, or you don't make it seem relevant, you don't really gain much by adding it anyway.

    Just like unis aren't just interested in your ECs on your UCAS form simply for the sake of it, just having random work experience which hasn't given you any demonstrable benefits isn't going to impress that many employers.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Some industries financially reward ruthlessness. Happiness isn't always achieved via the singular route of always being honest, after all not everyone feels guilt to the same degree as others.
    Well it depends how you find happiness. I've worked for a company where quite a few of the staff has ruthless/arrogant tendencies and it wasn't a fun place to work. I also got the impression that these people were often disliked more.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Some industries financially reward ruthlessness. Happiness isn't always achieved via the singular route of always being honest, after all not everyone feels guilt to the same degree as others.
    Guilt is a luxury.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Well it depends how you find happiness. I've worked for a company where quite a few of the staff has ruthless/arrogant tendencies and it wasn't a fun place to work. I also got the impression that these people were often disliked more.
    I don't see how lying on your cv to gain an advantage over others will make you any less happy, especially if you get the job. Some people handle guilt very well or simply don't let it affect them at all.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for the replies everyone!


    Personally, I don't feel comfortable about lying. I was just curious as to how many people lie about work experience.
    Also, after having the conversation with my boyfriend, I felt kind of ostracized for not wanting to take their offer. As if not lying is really wrong and a stupid thing to do. =( It made me feel bad.

    I'm a little nervous about getting a job, having to remember a lie would make me even more nervous - despite having it backed up by a legitimate business. So, I'm just gonna stick with the truth of things! I do plan to volunteer and I'm currently trying to find things to do to help with what experience I can put on a CV though. Wish me luck~
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've lied a fair bit. my friend sed he done it too! just dnt make it over the top!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Hmmmm. I'm not sure you should lie on your CV.
    Expand the truth perhaps, but try not to lie.
    If you do lie though, make sure that you can substantiate the lie.

    Personally, I haven't lied on a CV. Then again, I've never needed a CV.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jazmine)
    Thanks for the replies everyone!


    Personally, I don't feel comfortable about lying. I was just curious as to how many people lie about work experience.
    Also, after having the conversation with my boyfriend, I felt kind of ostracized for not wanting to take their offer. As if not lying is really wrong and a stupid thing to do. =( It made me feel bad.

    I'm a little nervous about getting a job, having to remember a lie would make me even more nervous - despite having it backed up by a legitimate business. So, I'm just gonna stick with the truth of things! I do plan to volunteer and I'm currently trying to find things to do to help with what experience I can put on a CV though. Wish me luck~
    If lying makes you nervous, don't do it. Lying requires confidence and a clarity of mind.

    Can you tell I'm an expert? :cool:

    And I wish you the best of luck.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by reems23)
    If you lie, learn your lie.
    I agree

    I imagine lying on CVs is rampant, and you (OP) sound like the kind of person who may get foudn out if you are not sure.

    That said, id you can get a reference you might be able to blag it, downside is of course they may ask you questions about it at the interview/when you start.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    don't your bound to get caught out
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    As other have said, on your CV you need to embellish the truth a little to make yourself stand out and seem amazing...but I don't think outright lying will get you anywhere. A lot of interviews I've been to have had questions along the lines of 'think of a time when you've...' so if none of your answers involve the previous work you've supposedly done then they might get a bit suspicious. Also would you know enough about the company to lie about any question they asked to do with it?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I don't even know what the company is for. =\ Let alone how to preform the tasks that she was saying I could say I did there. She would have to tell me how to do everything, so that I didn't get caught out, but I'd rather actually have the skills than fake them. I still believe I'd be caught out somewhere if I talk about skills and experience I don't have (at the interview or on the job). Especially if they put me with a task that I'm supposed to know but don't. I don't think there's any point regarding my situation.

    I'm just looking up things to do so that I can add them to my CV and not lie about anything. I would feel much better about it, as people have said before I'm not the kind of person who could lie about these things 'cause it doesn't rest easy on my conscience. Thus, I'd rather not do it. How often do people hand out their CVs? Just wondering how many companys actually require CVs.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    i dont think people explicitly lie on cvs - lying about work experience is too far - but exagerating your role is normal.

    Completely lying about work experience is probably going to be found out at interview. They might ask for a reference or might ask you questions about what you did there etc - its not worth it.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    What an unprofessional woman. So she handles CVs and job interviews for a living, and she's openly advising you to lie? Seems a bit off to me.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jazmine)
    Hello,


    I've started to prepare for job seeking! I've written a CV with the help of others. Then my boyfriend's mum offered to review it (which is great 'cause she looks at CVs and interviews people at her work!), but she said that most places would toss me aside because I have no work experience (other than looking after kids occasionally). So, she said I should lie on my CV and say that I've worked for her partner's business.

    But I don't feel comfortable with this at all. I got the impression from her that there's no hope in hell for me when it comes to getting a job, unless I say I've done more than I actually have. She also told me that this is really common, everyone lies on their CVs and so it's fine.

    I just wondered, is it true that lots of people lie on their CVs? I thought people would just lie about their skills perhaps but not their actually experience. I just can't imagine advising someone to lie about something like that, especially if it could backfire or if you're caught out by displaying that you don't really have the experience you claimed to have.
    Just do it. It is all semantics anyway and arguing about epistemological truths. What does 'worked for' mean? And her partner's 'business', what exactly is meant by that? Just go to her partner's business, and flush the toilet and ask to be paid 1 pence. There you go. You've 'worked for her partner's business'.
    Offline

    14
    At my work (accountancy firm) I was told this story of how they accepted this woman who claimed on her CV she had loads of experience including having done many bank recs (very basic - just make sure what the client has given you matches with the bank statements). She had no idea what she was doing and took sick leaves all the time.

    So yes, loads of people lie.

    I would advise you against it because of the high risk of getting asked on it. The maximum really is lying about your role in something you've been in and know all the backstory.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.