Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    economics is a great subject to start studying right now!
    economic history is being made every damn second at the moment!

    plus, it's a great building block in your career path, because it can open up many oppertunities
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Says the person who clearly has no idea what the field of economics is about. Hint: predicting economic conditions is a tiny portion of the field, usually not done by the top economists.
    Economics do have a "can't see the wood for the trees" aspect to it.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by reems23)
    'Sweetie' Piss off mate.


    Stop pretending you know everything, you are literally talking out your arse. Read a book.
    This.

    'Maker', you're a media tool.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Back to the OP, I think its a waste if a person with humility studies economics.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    At the end of the day it is all about how well you do in these degrees in University that will judge your future career. I think that Engineering has more Job opportunities for students, However Economics has a higher starting salary, but you must enter a top economics institute and graduate with a high degree to attain a job.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    It's funny how if you're good enough and you go to a top uni to do economics you can come out with an extremely high paying job. In the most respectful way possible - your family members know jack ****
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    To the OP: I was in a similar position to you when making my decision, it was either physics or economics. For me, i liked physics a considerable amount more than economics (though i did enjoy studying economics a lot too) and so i chose that, despite my family telling me there's not much money in it. You should study what interests you because at the end of the day, you're going to have to carry that interest through 3 or more years of your degree and possibly into your job.

    In regards to economics being considered a soft subject, i completely disagree. Being more of a science person myself, i've questioned the usefulness of some of the social sciences but economics is definitely not one of them. Besides, i've heard there's a lot of complicated maths in an economics degree.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    People somehow think Economics is **** since the credit crunch.
    Even The Economist thinks that.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    just do as much maths and stats modules as possible. although id say the econ modules are harder than those anyway.

    in terms of if you want to work in finance, i know ppl disagree, but having done econ will be so much better for you (i was told this by ppl at my spring internship, they say it doesnt matter too much, but it will be an advantage).

    but the real advice, do what you think you want. all i can say is, taking the right modules will stop you regretting taking econ so dont let that hold you back.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Darkglory)
    At the end of the day it is all about how well you do in these degrees in University that will judge your future career. I think that Engineering has more Job opportunities for students, However Economics has a higher starting salary, but you must enter a top economics institute and graduate with a high degree to attain a job.
    this is true. you should be at a top uni if you want to do econ. (oxbridge, although i dislike oxford's course, lse, ucl, warwick).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maker)
    I think you are incorrect sweetie.

    Economics is an intellectual plaything, it has theories that can't be proved or proved wrong. Economists are only right in hindsight and can't agree on anything such as if bailing out banks is a good or bad thing. Economists adopt "theories" on whim and fashion, not evidence.

    They even had to sneak in a fake Nobel prize for it, Alfred Nobel never established an award for economics only Physics, Chemistry, Medicine/physiology, peace and literature.
    gtfo.

    no science (except maths) can prove anything for sure. get your facts right.

    yes physics is more correct than econ, but thats because nature is more predictable than humans - which is what economics is about, in case you dont know.

    oh wow, you know about the Nobel Prizes. Well done.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hedgehunter)
    On my own experience (as stated in a previous post), whilst a few people in the Private Equity company my Dad works for did Accountancy or Economics, the majority did science or engineering degrees.

    However relevent Economics is, I think it is important to stress that one won't be uncompetitive in that career without an Economics degree.
    so true. actuarial science people make it very far for example. some woman CEO did it e.g.

    only thing id say is, maybe if more people had done econ they may have known better.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Here's the thing: I want to study economics at uni and am going to make 4 of his 5 applications to top 10 UK universities. I have now been advised more than once (by a family member and a close friend) not to do economics, because I could do "so much better than that" and because "it'd be a waste of my intelligence"

    The alternatives that both were implying was physics and/or engineering... making technological breakthroughs and all that.

    Now, it's all well and good if people just said "do what you want to do, what you enjoy" and so on. I just feel like there's a chance that I may one day look back and resent it, because of something that I could have been.

    What I really want to hear, is if people genuinely think that economics is a soft science, or whether it rivals the prestige associated with natural sciences. I don't necessarily even want to be an economist, but rather in financial services, and even a lady from such a background told me that she'd "have more respect for someone who had studied physics rather than economics".

    Maybe I'm talking rubbish, but it does make you doubt yourself if several unrelated people say the same thing.

    Cheers.


    EDIT: O ye, and another good point: I said economics is what I want to do, but physics is something I would quite like to do. So, if it was a matter of, urgh, physics I hate, then the choice would be easy. The problem is that I'm interested in both, and in economics, a little more than in physics.
    It is by no means a 'soft science'. Just consider the importance of economics in our lives and its complexity. Also bear in mind the vast investments made worldwide by governments, corporations, academic institutions into employing economists and so on.

    Economics rules our lives just as much as physics does. Moreover, I would like to ask why you've put this in the economics forum, where nobody would tell you otherwise.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Seriously, do what you think you will enjoy more, I'm looking to study economics but I don't know I might change to physics or maths by Uni so I keep my options open. Alot of people in finance do have a range of degree's, Chris Flowers majored in Maths and look how he's doing. Think carefully before you make your degree choice.

    Maker, stop critcising economics based on the media and the crisis in the financial sector, it was merely the economy finally going bust.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    economics is a very respectable degree especially in top unis
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Econight)
    Seriously, do what you think you will enjoy more, I'm looking to study economics but I don't know I might change to physics or maths by Uni so I keep my options open. Alot of people in finance do have a range of degree's, Chris Flowers majored in Maths and look how he's doing. Think carefully before you make your degree choice.

    Maker, stop critcising economics based on the media and the crisis in the financial sector, it was merely the economy finally going bust.
    Do you think economics and economists are above critcism? This is the type of hubris that got the world into this financial mess. There were other economists already predicting in the mid 2000s that the heavy reliance on credit to fuel property prices, consumer spending and the illusion risk had been allayed via CDS would result in a major crash but few economists took it seriously.

    I don't expect economists to predict the future precisely just as I don't expect weather forecasters to get it right all the time. What I have a issue with is weather forecasters would tell you there are storm clouds ahead and to expect rain but most economists are more like the mouth pieces of the organistion that employs them or funds their work which are mostly banks, financial institutions and governments who have a vested interest to always have an optimistic outlook and if storm clouds are on the horizon to ignore it lest it frightens the investors and voters.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maker)
    Do you think economics and economists are above critcism? This is the type of hubris that got the world into this financial mess. There were other economists already predicting in the mid 2000s that the heavy reliance on credit to fuel property prices, consumer spending and the illusion risk had been allayed via CDS would result in a major crash but few economists took it seriously.

    I don't expect economists to predict the future precisely just as I don't expect weather forecasters to get it right all the time. What I have a issue with is weather forecasters would tell you there are storm clouds ahead and to expect rain but most economists are more like the mouth pieces of the organistion that employs them or funds their work which are mostly banks, financial institutions and governments who have a vested interest to always have an optimistic outlook and if storm clouds are on the horizon to ignore it lest it frightens the investors and voters.
    Surely then, in your logic, it is much more valuable to study economics so as you are not led astray by any particular vested interests of corporate economists.

    In response to the question, both degrees are very well respected. Do whichever you feel you enjoy more and will thrive in studying for 3+ years.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Grapevine)
    OK, maybe that was a bit of an over exaggeration, but many bankers, accountants, management consultants and city traders all did economics degrees.

    Sure, a maths or physics degree (amongst others) would put you in a good position to pursue some sort of finance based career, but it can't be denied that economics is one of the most relevant, useful subjects in terms of the skills it involves and the knowledge you learn from studying it.
    I kinda agree.

    Many maths and physics PhDs are scouted out by top IB firms and employed as quants. However, economics is a very good degree for finance not because learning economics = learning finance (apart from the quantitative elements which you will also find in a physics or maths degree, it will not prepare you for finance) but because it is the/one of the hardest courses to get an offer for (LSE, Oxbridge <10%).

    You can't go wrong with economics, maths, physics, etc. Pick what you want to do; if you enjoy economics more than physics than go for it - just make sure you know what economics is, it may sound a little patronising but a lot of people don't.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Well, it's certainly a pretty vapid subject, at least in the mainstream. Who'd want to be part of an economic system based on evidently false axioms? :yum:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    don't study economics... waste .... what u need is petroleum engineering. guaranteed future
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: August 6, 2009
Poll
Is the Big Bang theory correct?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.