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A waste if an intelligent person studies economics??? watch

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    economics will get you the dough and *****es. if that isnt a good enough reason you are a weirdo
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    What about studying maths? Or a combined Economics and Maths degree?
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    (Original post by Hanoi)

    edit: oh shi, too bad this ended up on the next page...
    lolllll.... i need ur help... how do i post this on my sig?? i mean i see it as a small picture... but i wanted big as u posted it
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    (Original post by FAILINGKID)
    lolllll.... i need ur help... how do i post this on my sig?? i mean i see it as a small picture... but i wanted big as u posted it
    It's pretty simple, even an Economics student can work that one out. :ahee:
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    i don't really know much about how economics is regarded, but my dad did an accounting degree and is now a Financial Controller (or something like that) and he says, with hindsight, he didn't really need the degree in accounting to do his job. even with that i dont think he regrets doing it.

    plus if you end up doing something you enjoy for the rest of your working life, when will you get the opportunity to look back and ponder over what you could have become?
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    (Original post by Hanoi)
    It's pretty simple, even an Economics student can work that one out. :ahee:
    i got owned?
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    Even though I'm not drawn to the Economics field myself, I do feel it's up there in terms of respectability. If you feel you can't stand the next few years of Economics then there are always other degrees you could take that lead to the finance-orientated careers.

    And of course friends and family will say you're a clever person, but it's up to you what you yourself feel you can manage
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Here's the thing: I want to study economics at uni and am going to make 4 of his 5 applications to top 10 UK universities. I have now been advised more than once (by a family member and a close friend) not to do economics, because I could do "so much better than that" and because "it'd be a waste of my intelligence"

    The alternatives that both were implying was physics and/or engineering... making technological breakthroughs and all that.

    Now, it's all well and good if people just said "do what you want to do, what you enjoy" and so on. I just feel like there's a chance that I may one day look back and resent it, because of something that I could have been.

    What I really want to hear, is if people genuinely think that economics is a soft science, or whether it rivals the prestige associated with natural sciences. I don't necessarily even want to be an economist, but rather in financial services, and even a lady from such a background told me that she'd "have more respect for someone who had studied physics rather than economics".

    Maybe I'm talking rubbish, but it does make you doubt yourself if several unrelated people say the same thing.

    Cheers.


    EDIT: O ye, and another good point: I said economics is what I want to do, but physics is something I would quite like to do. So, if it was a matter of, urgh, physics I hate, then the choice would be easy. The problem is that I'm interested in both, and in economics, a little more than in physics.
    essays + maths = versatile economics degree.
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    You have been extremely misinformed! Economics is highly regarded
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I think you are incorrect sweetie.

    Economics is an intellectual plaything, it has theories that can't be proved or proved wrong. Economists are only right in hindsight and can't agree on anything such as if bailing out banks is a good or bad thing. Economists adopt "theories" on whim and fashion, not evidence.

    They even had to sneak in a fake Nobel prize for it, Alfred Nobel never established an award for economics only Physics, Chemistry, Medicine/physiology, peace and literature.
    go away
    what you are talking about is normative economics, the branch which is discussive and has no right or wrong answers because its based on valued judgment. The decision to bail out banks is mostly a normative decision. Positice economics is mostly scientific and based on facts and cause & effect. For example that in a perfectly competitive economy supply will equal demand. Thats not a "theory adopted on whim and fashion"
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    I'm aware that successful application percentages are tiny for economics in top unis, but does that say anything about the course or the subject as a whole?
    That its popular and you have to be the best if you want to get in? :confused:
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    no idiot go for economics its awesome and its a full-on-demand subject nowadayz ok
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Here's the thing: I want to study economics at uni and am going to make 4 of his 5 applications to top 10 UK universities. I have now been advised more than once (by a family member and a close friend) not to do economics, because I could do "so much better than that" and because "it'd be a waste of my intelligence"

    The alternatives that both were implying was physics and/or engineering... making technological breakthroughs and all that.

    Now, it's all well and good if people just said "do what you want to do, what you enjoy" and so on. I just feel like there's a chance that I may one day look back and resent it, because of something that I could have been.

    What I really want to hear, is if people genuinely think that economics is a soft science, or whether it rivals the prestige associated with natural sciences. I don't necessarily even want to be an economist, but rather in financial services, and even a lady from such a background told me that she'd "have more respect for someone who had studied physics rather than economics".

    Maybe I'm talking rubbish, but it does make you doubt yourself if several unrelated people say the same thing.

    Cheers.


    EDIT: O ye, and another good point: I said economics is what I want to do, but physics is something I would quite like to do. So, if it was a matter of, urgh, physics I hate, then the choice would be easy. The problem is that I'm interested in both, and in economics, a little more than in physics.
    At the end of the day only your friend and family member can explain the reasoning behind their views. e.g. do they have (logical and grounded) arguments supporting their views?
    Only if they can do that should their views carry much weight with you.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Do you think economics and economists are above critcism? This is the type of hubris that got the world into this financial mess. There were other economists already predicting in the mid 2000s that the heavy reliance on credit to fuel property prices, consumer spending and the illusion risk had been allayed via CDS would result in a major crash but few economists took it seriously.

    I don't expect economists to predict the future precisely just as I don't expect weather forecasters to get it right all the time. What I have a issue with is weather forecasters would tell you there are storm clouds ahead and to expect rain but most economists are more like the mouth pieces of the organistion that employs them or funds their work which are mostly banks, financial institutions and governments who have a vested interest to always have an optimistic outlook and if storm clouds are on the horizon to ignore it lest it frightens the investors and voters.
    No I don't think they are above critisim, but to be fair you have been merely ****ging off the subject of economics based on a select amount of economists not taking the warning signs up. It really comes down to the money, too much was being made during the highs which was silencing the few who knew this would happen. Also do you really expect employed economists not to produce information which does not either massage the truth to benefit their company. It's the harsh truth.
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    Of course its not a wate!! Go for it!!
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    (Original post by rupertj)
    Moreover, I would like to ask why you've put this in the economics forum, where nobody would tell you otherwise.
    No, very good point. I wasn't too sure where to put it, and I did think that having the thread here may mean there are biased opinions. But we're not holding an election; I guess I wanted reassurance that economics is the way, rather than being told otherwise.

    Either way, a couple of people have said otherwise, so it's all good.
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    (Original post by HotCoco.)
    And of course friends and family will say you're a clever person, but it's up to you what you yourself feel you can manage
    Sorry for the lack of modesty, but the issue isn't not being able to manage one degree over another. Let's just say hypothetically I am clever for a fact and could do well in both subjects... my question was, is it the case that economics is not "worthy" of being studied by me.

    And as far as I can see, the vast majority confirm that that's nonsense. Case closed?
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    (Original post by Paulwhy)
    At the end of the day only your friend and family member can explain the reasoning behind their views. e.g. do they have (logical and grounded) arguments supporting their views?
    Only if they can do that should their views carry much weight with you.
    Ye, that's the thing. The friend and my sister who had both said that kind of shrugged when I asked why and didn't explain in any way why they think so. I can only assume then that it's just how they themselves perceive economics as a discipline. Not every under 18 year old knows enough to value economics, but everyone knows that being a rocket scientist is really difficult.
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Sorry for the lack of modesty, but the issue isn't not being able to manage one degree over another. Let's just say hypothetically I am clever for a fact and could do well in both subjects... my question was, is it the case that economics is not "worthy" of being studied by me.

    And as far as I can see, the vast majority confirm that that's nonsense. Case closed?
    Just pick which one you think you would enjoy, obviously take into account opinions of others and career prospects. Look at the course outlines at certain unis and decide if they intrest you to spend 3 years in the field. If you have doubts that economics may not be "worthy" of being studied by you then obviously it may not be for you. Oh yeah decide if you want to continue research/ academia.
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    Ohh, gee, thanks!

    Ahaa, you can probably make 10x the amount being an economist
 
 
 
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