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A waste if an intelligent person studies economics??? watch

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    (Original post by Econight)
    If you have doubts that economics may not be "worthy" of being studied by you then obviously it may not be for you. Oh yeah decide if you want to continue research/ academia.
    I'll most probably go into employment after a 3 year degree. Sounds much nastier when you say it that way. It just does make you think, if several unrelated people say the same thing... you wander if there is truth in what they say. It's not something I would have otherwise got to doubting all by myself.
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    if the only reason you'd pick physics over economics is because of the "prestige" then definitely go for economics. People do have a high regard economics degrees from top unis, and I don't believe anyone can say economics is a waste of intelligence. instead, it requires intelligent people to grasp all the different economic theories, choose the relevant ones and apply them to the situation. If your going into the financial world anyway, then spending three years learning about theories you'll never use in physics would be pointless.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Economics is known as the dismal science presumably because its pretty dismal. I would have more respect for economists if more of them had predicted the credit crunch because a lot of the signs were there couple of years ago.

    I would go for natural science if you want to study a subject grounded in real evidence and theory rather than the vagueness of economics.
    rubbish
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    (Original post by Drogue)
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    ^^^ He is th best person to answer this. :yes:
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    Man, don't focus on the prestige of the degree, most likely you won't be able to finish a degree anyway if that's all you're holding on to.

    I started medical school, mostly due to the prestige, before university, my classmates would say "You have such a high grade average, you should become a doctor!", when I mentioned that I really dreamed of being a psychologist, I was shot down.

    My dad especially didn't agree upon me becoming a psychologist, frowned the thought, and when I started mentioning to him that I considered medical school, he suddenly opened up and started to 'love me'.

    Anyway it ended with me starting medical school, the first half year I was really bugged about it, ended up not even completing, retook the first half year, where I did great, but I couldn't respect myself enough to go to the exams, I ended up dropping out.

    Now I've applied for psychology, the feeling that I'm a little afraid of this, because of the lesser prestige, makes me feel it's right, because it makes me feel like it's a study I hold so dear, that despite such fears, I'd still want to do it.

    That's where I stand now, and from what I can hear of you, I wouldn't choose physics or economics, we all hate that "office nightmare" thought, where we end up in a soulless job with no possibility for a way out, but you're more likely to end up in that, if you choose something based on shallow decisions.

    Wishing you the best.
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    i honestly dont understand how someone can think and believe that are too intelligent to study a subject. it wouldnt be a waste at all if u studied economics if thats what you want to do. and no one is too intelligent for anything because there are always new things to be found out. so no it wouldnt be a waste at all if u studied it.
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Ye, that's the thing. The friend and my sister who had both said that kind of shrugged when I asked why and didn't explain in any way why they think so. I can only assume then that it's just how they themselves perceive economics as a discipline. Not every under 18 year old knows enough to value economics, but everyone knows that being a rocket scientist is really difficult.
    Then I think you need to make your own mind up.

    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Here's the thing: I want to study economics at uni and am going to make 4 of his 5 applications to top 10 UK universities.
    Check out the sticky threads in this thread.
    e.g. TAELT 2010

    What is your academic record:
    What GCSE grades did you get?
    What AS-levels are you doing and what grades are your predicted?
    What A-levels are you doing and what grades are your predicted?
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    (Original post by The Yield *****)
    Man, don't focus on the prestige of the degree, most likely you won't be able to finish a degree anyway if that's all you're holding on to.

    I started medical school, mostly due to the prestige, before university, my classmates would say "You have such a high grade average, you should become a doctor!", when I mentioned that I really dreamed of being a psychologist, I was shot down.

    My dad especially didn't agree upon me becoming a psychologist, frowned the thought, and when I started mentioning to him that I considered medical school, he suddenly opened up and started to 'love me'.

    Anyway it ended with me starting medical school, the first half year I was really bugged about it, ended up not even completing, retook the first half year, where I did great, but I couldn't respect myself enough to go to the exams, I ended up dropping out.

    Now I've applied for psychology, the feeling that I'm a little afraid of this, because of the lesser prestige, makes me feel it's right, because it makes me feel like it's a study I hold so dear, that despite such fears, I'd still want to do it.

    That's where I stand now, and from what I can hear of you, I wouldn't choose physics or economics, we all hate that "office nightmare" thought, where we end up in a soulless job with no possibility for a way out, but you're more likely to end up in that, if you choose something based on shallow decisions.

    Wishing you the best.
    Thank you for the advice. But what did you base that last part on? Not doing physics or economics?? or did you mean physics over economics?
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Thank you for the advice. But what did you base that last part on? Not doing physics or economics?? or did you mean physics over economics?
    I don't know you, but I meant for you to choose economics ("I wouldn't choose physics over economics" was what I meant).

    To me it seems like what you want to do is economics.

    And what you're being persuaded/manipulated into doing is physics.

    It'd be a shallow decision to choose physics if all you're doing it for is to command some level of respect.

    You should do what you'd love doing, now you may think "but I wouldn't love to not be respected!", which is a fair thought, but I've found that as people grow older, occupational status is quite a passé, and what matters more is personality, certainly people will like you more if you're a passionate person, passion is likable.

    So you should pursue what you'd love pursuing.
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    (Original post by SixthFormer08)
    Here's the thing: I want to study economics at uni and am going to make 4 of his 5 applications to top 10 UK universities. I have now been advised more than once (by a family member and a close friend) not to do economics, because I could do "so much better than that" and because "it'd be a waste of my intelligence"

    The alternatives that both were implying was physics and/or engineering... making technological breakthroughs and all that.

    Now, it's all well and good if people just said "do what you want to do, what you enjoy" and so on. I just feel like there's a chance that I may one day look back and resent it, because of something that I could have been.

    What I really want to hear, is if people genuinely think that economics is a soft science, or whether it rivals the prestige associated with natural sciences. I don't necessarily even want to be an economist, but rather in financial services, and even a lady from such a background told me that she'd "have more respect for someone who had studied physics rather than economics".

    Maybe I'm talking rubbish, but it does make you doubt yourself if several unrelated people say the same thing.

    Cheers.


    EDIT: O ye, and another good point: I said economics is what I want to do, but physics is something I would quite like to do. So, if it was a matter of, urgh, physics I hate, then the choice would be easy. The problem is that I'm interested in both, and in economics, a little more than in physics.
    It was Keynes himself, after all, who-having pointed out the paradox of our discipline as “an easy subject, at which very few excel!”-explained it in terms of the mix of gifts required of a “master-economist … mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher - in some degree”
    straight off the internet,
    Clearly Economics is not an easy subject, neither is physics.
    To insult such a good quality subject like economics is clearly arrogant.
    You have not given any indicator of economics being an 'easy' subject apart from the phrase 'dismal science' and that does not suggest easy but boring (which could easily said about physics from some people),
    i am willing to take a risk and say you have not even looked at what an economics degree actually entails: producing sound analytical arguments from information given, through numbers or words (a skill any employer would like people to have)
    maybe you should therefore ask your family about why they think that and then see how the responses will be "they didn't spot the biggest global slump since the 1930s"; well people also used to think the world was flat.
    To state economics is a waste is axiomatic to state that we shouldn't use petrol at all because that will run out in 40 years
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I think you are incorrect sweetie.

    Economics is an intellectual plaything, it has theories that can't be proved or proved wrong. Economists are only right in hindsight and can't agree on anything such as if bailing out banks is a good or bad thing. Economists adopt "theories" on whim and fashion, not evidence.

    They even had to sneak in a fake Nobel prize for it, Alfred Nobel never established an award for economics only Physics, Chemistry, Medicine/physiology, peace and literature.

    im gonna be a pedantic ****** here but i think you'll find your sentence should read ".....theories that can't be proved." whether 'right' or 'wrong', if it cant be proved it does not matter.

    regards

    Thomas
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    I really think that Economics is an amazing degree to do. I've met so many people who wish they had done it at undergrad(and indeed went back and did postgrad diplomas and stuff)

    Economics gives you a really good understanding of how the world works, almost everything these days is linked to the economy, and from that perspective economis is very useful to have.

    It's also well regarded by employers, assuming you do a really good course, you will do a lot of maths, and it will be very rigourous. It's certainly not a "soft" option, by any stretch of the imagination.

    Economists, have a massive influence on what happens in the world, and for that reason it's very necessary that intelligent people go into the field.
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    (Original post by Darkglory)
    I think that Engineering has more Job opportunities for students, However Economics has a higher starting salary, but you must enter a top economics institute and graduate with a high degree to attain a job.

    I would disagree about engineering having more job opportunities than economics. You can use economics for almost anything.

    Also, people should be very wary of doing courses that are vocational. There's lots of people who go into a course that's quite vocational because there is a high demand for those skills only to find when they come out of Uni that that demand has fallen, leaving them with a very specific and not very useful qualification.

    In terms of job prospects what is most important when you do your degree is transferable skills.
 
 
 
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