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    So I started on the GS App and they give you a choice to select two divisions and for each two locations. How does this work exactly for the locals. DOes your app go to both offices and they both consider you? ALso, could I for example choose Securities for both division options, and hence apply for four different locals?
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    yes.
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    is gs already open??
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    they don't mention language requirements - e.g. whether you need to be able to read and write in Mandarin fluently if your 2nd choice is Kong Hong or if you need to be able to read and write in Hindi/Kannada if you're applying to Mumbai/Bangalore.

    What should I assume?

    squish.
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    (Original post by Banachi)
    is gs already open??
    Yep, Barcap is open too (hint: rolling basis recruitment, slip it in quick).

    Also if accountancy takes your fancy then Deloitte Touche Tomahatsu's been taking apps since 1st Jul.

    squish.
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    before even thinking of applying for any kind of job/internship/insight day in banking, you'd better read this ladies: http://www.classiccmp.org/transputer...Volume%202.pdf

    it's good.
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    before even thinking of applying for any kind of job/internship/insight day in banking, you'd better read this ladies: http://www.classiccmp.org/transputer...Volume%202.pdf

    it's good.
    thanks for the info! Have you read it fully?

    Merrill produced a simpler 'guide to the causes of the CCrunch ' earlier.

    Have you got an IMC/SII/CFA?
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    thanks for the info! Have you read it fully?

    Merrill produced a simpler 'guide to the causes of the CCrunch ' earlier.

    Have you got an IMC/SII/CFA?
    to answer your two questions: yes, no.

    i was joking. that handbook is only directly relevant to correlation desks, which aren't exactly great in number nor very successful these days.

    this on the other hand is very good foor everyone - http://www.scribd.com/doc/3009233/cr...-handbook-2006 .
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    to answer your two questions: yes, no.

    i was joking. that handbook is only directly relevant to correlation desks, which aren't exactly great in number nor very successful these days.

    this on the other hand is very good foor everyone - http://www.scribd.com/doc/3009233/cr...-handbook-2006 .
    quite long, no doubt - not much time to enter a discourse with that - even if you do have 3 interviews with GS? Have you had a peek at Traders, Guna&Money - bit of maths in there but not to the same depth or treated with the same formality as JPM's guide. Where did you get this stuff?
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    to answer your two questions: yes, no.

    i was joking. that handbook is only directly relevant to correlation desks, which aren't exactly great in number nor very successful these days.

    this on the other hand is very good foor everyone - http://www.scribd.com/doc/3009233/cr...-handbook-2006 .
    I'm quite new to the world of IB, but I've read through some books and websites and am starting to get the hang of what one could do to enhance his chances of landing an offer for an internship. Is the handbook you recommend about something that the interviewers often question interviewees about or why do you think its good for applicants to read it?

    I have very limited sources of what one might call 'conventional wisdom' conerning IB, so I'd like to ask everybody just how important it is with IB's that you apply early. Of course with any job it's always good to be early and this question can be mostly answered by using common sense, but I'd still like to know whether the banks make a big deal out of this. Any ideas would be appreciated!
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    quite long, no doubt - not much time to enter a discourse with that - even if you do have 3 interviews with GS? Have you had a peek at Traders, Guna&Money - bit of maths in there but not to the same depth or treated with the same formality as JPM's guide. Where did you get this stuff?
    yes, i have read that book. that book is about rates derivs rather than credit derivatives, even though Das has a lot to say on cds these days too.

    of course you can talk about this stuff. in an interview, they want to know what you're interested in and what you know. tell them what you've read, they'll find it a lot more interesting than talking about 'your proudest moment' or w/e. this assumes of course you're interviewing with a derivs desk, but if you're not, there's probably even more stuff you can read. learn numbers.

    you can google more stuff than you can ever imagine. just type in a company, a researcher, the topic you want. obviously finding up to date stuff is best. there are a few key phrases you kind of pick up... e.g. typing in "correlation trading" gets you **** all, typing in "base correlation" gets you lots.
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    (Original post by Mecken)
    Are you suggesting that the material in that handbook could be something one could use in an IB interview? Is it usual for prospective interns to read material of this kind?

    I'm quite new to the world of IB, but I've read through some books and websites and am starting to get the hang of what one could do to enhance his chances of landing an offer for an internship
    depends entirely on what you'd like to do.

    if you like credit derivs, that handbook is pretty basic. do most interns start of knowing that though? no. but hey, put yourself ahead of the curve.

    if you like equities, i'm sure there's an equivalent text somewhere.

    or just read the ft every day.
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    yes, i have read that book. that book is about rates derivs rather than credit derivatives, even though Das has a lot to say on cds these days too.

    of course you can talk about this stuff. in an interview, they want to know what you're interested in and what you know. tell them what you've read, they'll find it a lot more interesting than talking about 'your proudest moment' or w/e. this assumes of course you're interviewing with a derivs desk, but if you're not, there's probably even more stuff you can read. learn numbers.

    you can google more stuff than you can ever imagine. just type in a company, a researcher, the topic you want. obviously finding up to date stuff is best. there are a few key phrases you kind of pick up... e.g. typing in "correlation trading" gets you **** all, typing in "base correlation" gets you lots.
    Some of the material in the handbooks appears very mathematical - have you memorized the equations?! Wouldn't have thought they'd ask you about your 'proudest moment' - looks like the interview would be getting quite desperate by that stage.

    I go for some latest sector research - obvs. check out the last 2 quarters' reports for the firm etc. About the only numbers I look at (and can memorize) will be FTSE100/FTSEurofirst, S&P500, NASDAQ, DOW, CAC40, XetraDax, Sensex, Nikkei & HangSeng. Oh and commods and currencies. Not such much rates. Oh and share prices on the day etc. Do you trade yourself? I'm attempting to dabble in FX.
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    depends entirely on what you'd like to do.

    if you like credit derivs, that handbook is pretty basic. do most interns start of knowing that though? no. but hey, put yourself ahead of the curve.

    if you like equities, i'm sure there's an equivalent text somewhere.

    or just read the ft every day.
    Handbooks are good post-exam, pre-internship reading I guess (If you've got the time!). Though an early start is certainly the best way.

    With an S&T interview at a let's say, mid-tier firm 'market knowledge' (read: commercial awareness) may be the emphasis - you can get in some places without even really saying that much, but at GS interviews I think its 3 split into:

    1. competency based
    2. technical (i.e. way more than simple market awareness) and
    3. career plans/aspirations and the old brainteasers?

    FT is good fpr awareness - front page, inside feature, LEX, Comp & Markets, Fund Mgt on a Monday but regards technicalities...hmmmm.
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    1. competency based
    2. technical (i.e. way more than simple market awareness) and
    3. career plans/aspirations and the old brainteasers?

    FT is good fpr awareness - front page, inside feature, LEX, Comp & Markets, Fund Mgt on a Monday but regards technicalities...hmmmm.
    no.

    that's the format of an interview if the interviewer is bored and has to drive the interview.

    if you put on your cv that you've been working with a phd at your uni on some pricing or model, they'll probably want to talk about that.
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Some of the material in the handbooks appears very mathematical - have you memorized the equations?! Wouldn't have thought they'd ask you about your 'proudest moment' - looks like the interview would be getting quite desperate by that stage.

    I go for some latest sector research - obvs. check out the last 2 quarters' reports for the firm etc. About the only numbers I look at (and can memorize) will be FTSE100/FTSEurofirst, S&P500, NASDAQ, DOW, CAC40, XetraDax, Sensex, Nikkei & HangSeng. Oh and commods and currencies. Not such much rates. Oh and share prices on the day etc. Do you trade yourself? I'm attempting to dabble in FX.
    don't memorize anything.

    the maths in that book is trivial.

    instead of memorizing numbers, build a workbook and paper trade, i dunno, bunds and the eurostoxx. you'll soon find you know where a lot of numbers are.
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    (Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
    they ask for transcripts, other attachments but we don't get a transcript in our first year at Cambridge.
    I don't think they do.

    US & Canada students only. We don't get a transcript either. Or an 'official' end of year grade - that's only for US universities - with UK universities it's just a predicted score usually (based on what you've done so far).
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    depends entirely on what you'd like to do.

    if you like credit derivs, that handbook is pretty basic. do most interns start of knowing that though? no. but hey, put yourself ahead of the curve.

    if you like equities, i'm sure there's an equivalent text somewhere.

    or just read the ft every day.
    Oh, I see now! Well, it's equities that I'm interested in, but I can safely say that I should be able to manage if that's where an interview would go. I was just wondering if that handbook was one of those books that has a 'bible' status amongst applicants.

    The term 'commercial awareness' has been mentioned a couple of times. This term is at least to some extent culture bound, so I'd like to ask what does commercial awareness refer to in the UK. You say that reading FT helps one to a start. Never read an issue (I live in Finland), but I have a hunch of the topics the paper discusses, so would you consider a person who reads FT regularly 'commercially aware' or does it take a lot more than that.

    Are the people in UK aware of what's going on in the US, Germany, Japan etc. markets or do they mostly concentrate on following LSE? This question may seem silly to some of you, but for me it's not obvious, after all, the majority of articles in Finnish economic/finance publications discuss only Finnish companies.

    Also, I'd be interested in hearing what exactly is discussed in these 'technical interviews'. Yes, general ideas can be read from many sources, but I'd like to hear something specific. Anybody?
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    (Original post by Prince of Zamunda)
    There's no advantage in applying to GS this early as they won't look at the app till after the deadline.
    Yea around halfway through the app I noticed that they dont start reviwing apps until January.
 
 
 
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