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Are Degree Grades Worth the Same? - Consistency and Dumbing Down Watch

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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    How does that work though, lets say for sake of argument they both attended the same institution and course, why is the 1st at any disadvantage as, surely, it's the most up to date reflection of the persons ability. Do I need to state that A-levels are far from perfect measures anyway?
    Well I never said that A levels were perfect measures but it shows that you were "good" in a variety of subjects. For example, take me - I studied all the sciences and maths at A level and now I am studying economics. It shows I have a good grasp of science to A level standard, but I can also write a decent essay in my degree. I also feel it is a lot more rare to find a student who achieved a first with a well rounded CV than a student who achieved 2.1. I am actually speaking from personal experience as I know at least two students in my economics class who got a first in their first year but did absolutely 0 extra curriculars and work experience. Obviously I am not saying that this applies to everyone but it is a lot more rare.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    How does that work though, lets say for sake of argument they both attended the same institution and course, why is the 1st at any disadvantage as, surely, it's the most up to date reflection of the persons ability? Do I need to state that A-levels are far from perfect measures anyway?
    Yep, that's my point.

    I've never had anyone criticise me for having a first - it has always been seen as a positive thing.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Nice attempt at a diversion but the two things you'v stated aren't the same at all. I'm quite willing to accept that employers are looking at more than degree grades, but a first with a good level of work experience and EC's is going to be more compelling to an employer than a 2:1 and the same, regardless of A-level grades. Having a first doesn't mean you automatically lack a well-rounded CV so that's a bit of a straw man.
    All I've seen A-level grades used for (and I interview graduates) is an initial auto-filter step and beyond that point they are useless, and that is bypassable anyway. Good A-level grades don't really help 'round' your CV at all as they are just a lower level of academic qualification.
    In your previous post you said that if two students studying the same degree had different A level grades but one achieved a first and the other a 2.1 you would pick the guy with the first. You failed to take into account that the rigour of economic degrees varies GREATLY by institution. The top 10/11 economic schools that have a rigorous economics degree with a lot of econometrics only accept students with AAB/AAA or more. Universities that let in students with BBB for economics offer a very very watered down version of economics with hardly any mathematical rigour - so I don't see why you think a first is more impressive from a lower institution?
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    Well I never said that A levels were perfect measures but it shows that you were "good" in a variety of subjects. For example, take me - I studied all the sciences and maths at A level and now I am studying economics. It shows I have a good grasp of science to A level standard, but I can also write a decent essay in my degree.
    The difference in level between degree and A-levels is so huge that this really is rather nonsensical. Also, most graduate employers really aren't that interested in what you know or are good at academically, they are interested in your potential to learn and develop into a useful high-level employee that is what your previous educational background means to them.

    I also feel it is a lot more rare to find a student who achieved a first with a well rounded CV than a student who achieved 2.1. I am actually speaking from personal experience as I know at least two students in my economics class who got a first in their first year but did absolutely 0 extra curriculars and work experience. Obviously I am not saying that this applies to everyone but it is a lot more rare.
    I'd say your experience was incredibly limited, tbh. If I only had that level of experience I wouldn't be so confident about stating such opinions.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    The difference in level between degree and A-levels is so huge that this really is rather nonsensical. Also, most graduate employers really aren't that interested in what you know or are good at academically, they are interested in your potential to learn and develop into a useful high-level employee that is what your previous educational background means to them.



    I'd say your experience was incredibly limited, tbh. If I only had that level of experience I wouldn't be so confident about stating such opinions.
    In which non science/engineering job would you ever need to do analysis that is harder than physics A level? I also don't see how you can discount Chemistry and Physics A levels because they are still fairly rigorous (especially physics as not many students study it now)
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    It really worries me when companies use A-levels as filters, even in the words of one graduate recruiter at a careers fair: ''A-levels are 100% meaningless''.



    I can tell you that first year scientists typically don't have a good grasp of science. The emphasis on extracurriculars varies with the industry applied to but we should avoid making generilsations as graduate employment isn't general, it's quite specific. So I guess you think having a broader CV is the real discriminating factor rather than the degree class?
    Yeah I would agree with that. I understand for science/engineering jobs the degree class probably makes a huge difference as it shows technical know how. However, for finance jobs which I am going for internships/ec's count for a hell a lot more than a first. Similarly, from the words of the HR person in my company " Having an internship sends your resume to the top of the pile ".
 
 
 
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