Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    ...relative to the A level experience perhaps?

    is it more memorising or understanding?

    is the work load that massive?

    what is it that makes medicine 'difficult' - if at all?

    how did you generally find month/semester? was the experience similar to what you had expected

    erm that is all... i would greatly appreciate the input of some medics.

    thank you
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    From what I've read on the forums,

    The sheer volume of what you have to study is what's difficult, not the concept (at least relatively). So I guess it's more memorising.

    Everyone seems to have the time for a night out every other day aside from when it's nearing exam time. I'm not sure how the work load differs from university to university, though.

    Certain places put more emphasis on the science side of things and go into more depth, maybe the work load is heavier there :confused:

    Can't really comment on the others :p: Again, this is only what I've gathered from what I've read here - I'm not an actual student yet, so feel free to ignore :P
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Revealing what it is really like would spoil the fun of discovering it for yourself during first year, would it not?

    otherwise, ^ poster has got it pretty much correct
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    You can't really measure it relative to A-Levels, bit of an apples and pears thing. Two completely different modes of study.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    75% memorising, 25% understanding... but that 25% come from a small number of quite complex topics. In my University, in our second year, we could choose modules. I chose one on nerves and got lectures from some professor on how spike train action potentials are generated in neurones. Christ it was complicated. Renal physiology can be complicated, but can be simple - these things really depend on how much depth your med school want to go into.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by blip)
    ...relative to the A level experience perhaps?

    is it more memorising or understanding?

    is the work load that massive?

    what is it that makes medicine 'difficult' - if at all?

    how did you generally find month/semester? was the experience similar to what you had expected

    erm that is all... i would greatly appreciate the input of some medics.

    thank you
    More memorising, more understanding. You don't have spec-specific textbooks to spell everything out to you.

    I found the first semester a bit of a shock to the system. I was the kinda a-level student who couldn't be bothered outside of college. At uni, I had to put a lot of extra hours in.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lu-x)
    More memorising, more understanding. You don't have spec-specific textbooks to spell everything out to you.

    I found the first semester a bit of a shock to the system. I was the kinda a-level student who couldn't be bothered outside of college. At uni, I had to put a lot of extra hours in.
    I was the kinda GCSE student that couldn't be bother outside of school, Medicine will slap me in the face for sure!!

    Ps. Nice sig!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by blip)
    ...relative to the A level experience perhaps?

    is it more memorising or understanding?

    is the work load that massive?

    what is it that makes medicine 'difficult' - if at all?

    how did you generally find month/semester? was the experience similar to what you had expected

    erm that is all... i would greatly appreciate the input of some medics.

    thank you
    It's been a few years since I did my A levels, but I remember not having to do a huge amount of work outside of school and almost 'coasted' through them (as bad as that may sound). I had a good memory and things seemed to stick back then.

    Now at uni, things still stick but the sheer quantity of stuff requires much more work outside of uni hours. There's lots more 'busy work' for us to do, completing log books (write ups of patients and background info for the case as well as case comparisons, long cases and comorbidities). We have to do a lot of reading in our own time as we can't attend all the seminars (so need to catch up on those we miss).

    I think in my case, a lot of it is understanding rather than memorising a huge amount of information though there is definitely a fair amount of that involved as well.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    It's kind of like swimming, but with facts as water.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    sex, drugs, rock and roll
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThisLittlePiggy)
    It's kind of like swimming, but with facts as water.
    this is very apt.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by No Future)
    this is very apt.
    He forgot the millstone.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Well you have much more free time than at school I suppose? Plus you can obviously miss lectures in a way you couldn't with school lessons.

    Um, a lot to remember mostly.

    But in terms of actual work throughout the year, probably A levels were harder for me - because of things like History coursework, Chemistry writeups etc which we don't have here!

    I'm guessing my upcoming clinical experience will give me a very different view of medicine though. So we'll see!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Better hope we got some good memories by then!

    Brain training it is!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    From my experience, second year was stupidly hard with ridiculous volumes of stuff - so much that you couldn't possibly know it all. It's very different to A Level in that respect. In A Level, I felt like I needed to know every little detail and pretty much knew what they were going to ask in the exams - and in A Level I felt like I could actually know pretty much everything. In Medical school, you have no idea what will come up. That's the scary thing.

    There are some areas that really do help if you understand the concepts - then you will be able to understand why some conditions cause certain symptoms, or why a drug may be effective. A lot of our exams in the pre-clinical years involved relentless numbers of multiple choice questions, so this was simply just learning fact after fact. No chance there to write a short essay and hope you hit enough marks!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: August 10, 2009

University open days

  1. University of Bradford
    University-wide Postgraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  2. University of Buckingham
    Psychology Taster Tutorial Undergraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  3. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Campus Visit Undergraduate
    Wed, 1 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.