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Do you think Scotland have a national dish? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you think Scotland have a national dish?
    Yes
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    No
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    18.18%

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    In Scotland, is there a meal which is considered a 'national dish'?

    Many people say that it is 'haggis' - do many people tend to eat haggis?

    I read in a guidebook that sometimes you would be looked at strangely in Scotland (Alba) if you asked for a 'full English breakfast'.

    In Scotland - do people tend to eat very similar breakfast contents to people in England (but not call it a full ENGLISH breakfast'?

    Is fast food more common than 'traditional' dishes do you reckon? Wasn't the chain McDonalds started by a family of Scottish ancestry?

    Have 'curry houses' caught on with the same frequency in the Scottish highlands & islands (like Lewis & Harris & Tiree & Coll) than in rural areas of England.

    squish.
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    Aye, we all have your mum for breakfast,lunch and dinner.
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    Squash
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    There's a tonne of Scottish dishes. Cullen skink, Scotch broth, Abroath smokies, haggis, mince and tatties, butterscotch,...

    Consult: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_cuisine
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    In Scotland, is there a meal which is considered a 'national dish'?

    Many people say that it is 'haggis' - do many people tend to eat haggis?
    Well, yes.

    (Original post by xps.systems)
    I read in a guidebook that sometimes you would be looked at strangely in Scotland (Alba) if you asked for a 'full English breakfast'.

    In Scotland - do people tend to eat very similar breakfast contents to people in England (but not call it a full ENGLISH breakfast'?
    No, not really. Have you really ever seen an English person eat a square sausage, a potato scone or a black pudding?

    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Is fast food more common than 'traditional' dishes do you reckon? Wasn't the chain McDonalds started by a family of Scottish ancestry?
    If you don't count chip shops as 'traditional' then no. And I have no idea whether it was, but it's not really relevant.

    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Have 'curry houses' caught on with the same frequency in the Scottish highlands & islands (like Lewis & Harris & Tiree & Coll) than in rural areas of England.

    squish.
    You'd struggle to find anyone referring to an Indian restaurant as a 'curry house' in Scotland, but I imagine they have. Actually, the best Thai restaurant I've been to is on the Isle of Lewis.
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    sorry that should be 'has' instead of 'have' in the title.

    What do you reckon might be the 'dish of choice' for Scottish people?

    Sorry I forgot to include scones.

    squish.
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    (Original post by Ekpyrotic)
    There's a tonne of Scottish dishes. Cullen skink, Scotch broth, Abroath smokies, haggis, mince and tatties, butterscotch,...

    Consult: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_cuisine
    Are these dishes considered quite 'local' as opposed to universally Alban (Scottish).

    Like 'Bakewell Tarts' are served in many English restaurants even though it is a dish local to the Peak District.

    Would say, Arbroath Smokies be served away from the Pictish coast - in say Greenock? or Ayr? or Stranraer? or Galashiels?

    squish.
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    Yes Haggis neeps and potatos or mince and tatties and fried mars bars .
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Are these dishes considered quite 'local' as opposed to universally Alban (Scottish).

    Like 'Bakewell Tarts' are served in many English restaurants even though it is a dish local to the Peak District.

    Would say, Arbroath Smokies be served away from the Pictish coast - in say Greenock? or Ayr? or Stranraer? or Galashiels?

    squish.
    Mince and tatties, haggis, broth etc. are all universally Scottish as far as I know. But I'm fae Aberdeenshire so dinnae really ken what central belters are like.
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    Is it my eyes or is there alot of Scottish threads now?
    OT: I think they do but not sure what it is
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Are these dishes considered quite 'local' as opposed to universally Alban (Scottish).

    Like 'Bakewell Tarts' are served in many English restaurants even though it is a dish local to the Peak District.

    Would say, Arbroath Smokies be served away from the Pictish coast - in say Greenock? or Ayr? or Stranraer? or Galashiels?

    squish.
    I'm from ayr, and not to be blunt or anything, but wtf is a Arbroath Smokie? :lolwut:

    Oh, and our national dish is sheeps stomach, and children.
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    (Original post by LuhLah)
    I'm from ayr, and not to be blunt or anything, but wtf is a Arbroath Smokie? :lolwut:

    Oh, and our national dish is sheeps stomach, and children.
    Smoked haddock from Arbroath. Delicious. :yy:
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    (Original post by foxo)
    Smoked haddock from Arbroath. Delicious. :yy:
    Oooo. Now, where did I leave my bagpipes....:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Econight)
    Is it my eyes or is there alot of Scottish threads now?
    OT: I think they do but not sure what it is
    So it's true! It's 05:20 here and I thought my eyes were deceiving me.
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    (Original post by LuhLah)
    Oooo. Now, where did I leave my bagpipes....:rolleyes:
    Can you play bagpipes? If so what tunes do you play - are they traditional ones like 'Auld Lang Syne' or less well known ones?

    squish.
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Can you play bagpipes? If so what tunes do you play - are they traditional ones like 'Auld Lang Syne' or less well known ones?

    squish.
    Yep. I run up to the highlands everyday, toss a log, eat a sheep, get pissed, play the bagpipes (flower of scotland, of course), and then to finish the day, we all do a massive jig

    Kidding. I loathe bagpipes.
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    I've never had Haggis, but my local chippy will serve you a Haggis supper. An english breakfast can be found at most places but in my area it's normally referred to as a 'full breakfast' or 'scottish breakfast'
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    (Original post by foxo)
    No, not really. Have you really ever seen an English person eat a square sausage, a potato scone or a black pudding?
    Yes, me. I love those things and I don't have a drop of Scottish blood in me.
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    (Original post by Norfolkadam)
    Yes, me. I love those things and I don't have a drop of Scottish blood in me.
    Well, what I mean is that if you go into an English cafe and ask for a tattie scone or a square sausage you'll get a very funny look. :p:
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    (Original post by foxo)
    Well, what I mean is that if you go into an English cafe and ask for a tattie scone or a square sausage you'll get a very funny look. :p:
    Tis true. Although I live in Norfolk and the Wanger & Snatch (both best breakfast café and best double-entendre name for a café) does a Scottish breakfast with all that jazz in it.

    Still you can't get hold of square sausage for love nor money in Tesco.
 
 
 
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