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    (Original post by Haeron)
    Yes yes, I was joking :P Plus he mentions the lack of evidence for the American claims. Did I mention the Americans haven't come up with any evidence? Yeah, well they haven't come up with any evidence. I mentioned the lack of evidence, didn't I...?
    Hmm, I do remember you mentioning it..



    Anyways, I don't see this being over-turned by our (waste of a vote) Government so, I hope he gets a fair trial and can be represented accordingly.
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    I think its unfair. They're secruity should have been more secure in first place if these files are so top secret. Plus he was just a UFO fanatic not a terrorist or something, think they are being too harsh on him. He should be punished yeah maybe a year in prison but not that length they were talking about.
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    (Original post by g_star_raw_1989)
    They should give him a job :yep:
    Just what i was thinking.

    This guy was secretly in and out of the US systems like a **** in a hooker.

    He must be able to get into any system in the world putting his mind to it.

    Very impressive!!
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    A potential crime was committed on US territory. It should be up to the US to try it. I just hope that the US show mercy.

    At the end of the day, we signed an extradition Treaty. Yes the mechanics of it are crude, but its not a case of us being USA's ****: we can extradite people from the US as well.
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    This is one of the few news story's that actually makes me angry. It's ridiculous that MPs didn't have the guts to stand up in the house of commons and be counted to prevent this vulnerable man being extradited.
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    im on his side. but have you seen the mothers comments? she makes obama sound like jesus.
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    So... Imagine an undercover police officer comes up to you and offers you cocaine for a really cheap price. It doesn't make it right to take it just because it's cheap, which is pretty much his whole defence.

    Also, even if all you do with the cocaine is take it home and put it in the bin, a major offence is in the buying and possessing of it.

    Two other things in his defence are that he's got aspergers (so a disability now means you can't be extradited? We wouldn't hesitate to extradite an illegal immigrant with aspergers) and that public opinion is against him going to America (so the public now decides the law? I don't think that's the public's job tbh, unless we're having a revolution).

    I know sending him to America will get him a disproportionately harsh sentence, but, you know, international law is there for a reason. Turning our noses up at it the moment we don't like it is kind of hypocritical giving all the **** we give other countries for it.
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    (Original post by Gesar)

    I know sending him to America will get him a disproportionately harsh sentence, but, you know, international law is there for a reason. Turning our noses up at it the moment we don't like it is kind of hypocritical giving all the **** we give other countries for it.
    He will get 18 months in a low security prison - probably like the one Madoff is in which has tennis courts.

    Anyway that's the response that I got from my dad - a US lawyer.
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    Then I don't see the problem :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Gesar)
    Then I don't see the problem :dontknow:
    Nor do I.

    Britons are worried that the US Penal system is too tough for someone as weak as Gary, a likeable guy who may not have even realized the full consequences of his actions because of asbergers. But what Britons do not realize is that this has made 0 news in the States and that Americans are not calling for his head. The US legal system will jail him to deter future hackers, hackers of the similar mold of Gary (not harmful but potentially distracting) but the US will put him in a low security prison for 18 months.

    After all the UK is America's greatest ally and the US does not want to screw up the relationship in anyway. Therefore the US will give him a very minor sentence in one of the nicer prisons - tennis courts included:woo:
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    (Original post by dn013)
    but the US will put him in a low security prison for 18 months.

    Therefore the US will give him a very minor sentence in one of the nicer prisons - tennis courts included:woo:
    can you confirm this? can you see into the future?
    if he gets alot more will you then change sides and think he shouldnt have gone?
    if its only a matter of months in prison i dont see the problem, but really if its not that big a scentence why cant he do it here? what is the US gaining from extroditing him? is it because they want to give him a harsher scentence than he would be facing if he stayed in this country?
    its not as if the us cant trust our legal system.
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    (Original post by 1721)
    can you confirm this? can you see into the future?
    if he gets alot more will you then change sides and think he shouldnt have gone?
    if its only a matter of months in prison i dont see the problem, but really if its not that big a scentence why cant he do it here? what is the US gaining from extroditing him? is it because they want to give him a harsher scentence than he would be facing if he stayed in this country?
    its not as if the us cant trust our legal system.
    Its because the crime was committed against the US and so both the US and UK governments see it fit that he serve time in the US. Look the US and UK legal systems are similar, he will get 18 months to 2 years, US judges are not stupid and know that he is harmless - but it is the message that is important. If the US does not extradite him then what is to stop malicious hackers from hacking into US military computers from, say, Sudan - once they are caught Sudan could just say 'why should we extradite them when you the UK did not allow the extradition of Gary - is it special treatment?'

    The US is not going to put him in a high security prison, that would be a waste of a cell and extremely unprofessional. The US penal system will put him in a low security facility - I mean look at Madoff, the guy is the biggest fraud in history and he is in a prison where he gets to play tennis... Mckinnon will serve a maximum of 2 years in jail, a short sentence especially because he is British and has already pleaded guilty, and then he will probably be a consultant to the US military on cyber matters.

    edit - I can only see into the future because I know how good the US legal system is - he won't get lets say 70 years in prison so there is no need even to talk about a long jail sentence
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    He should be employed as an ethical hacker for software companies, or even better, for the US government. Who better to test your security than someone who has already succeeded in getting past it?
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    They were running windows and they hadn't changed the passwords from the default, or something like that. There was little to no skill involved. Hence my point above that if the drugs are easy to take, it doesn't make it ok to take them.
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    a defence of "entrapment" could be used for the police officer and cocaine example above

    surely the problem here is that he might not be able to have a free and fair trial in the us.

    A jury over there is likely to be influenced by the remarks of the us government and media hype, which could affect the way that his case is heard and how the information is considered by the jury.

    Why not agree with the us to trial him at brussels, nato, or the international court where they were putting the war criminals of bosnia/serbia on trial, so that the national interests of both the uk and us have no effect on the punishment or sentence given...

    he could be given a job instead if he was useful to the us and has actually done everyone in the us a favour. their lives may have been at risk due to this lapse in security...
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    (Original post by dn013)
    Your powers of deduction don't impress me.

    He commits a crime but should not be brought to court and sentenced. :rolleyes: Let the courts make a ruling on his case, he committed a crime and should be brought before a court - let them sentence him.
    When have I said that?

    Yes, he should be tried by a court, after all, he admits the crimes he's committed. However, it's clear to me that this punishment that he can expect from the US courts system, is totally disproportionate and considering that they've never demonstrated how these monetary "damages" were accrued, I'm very skeptical about the way the US government is trying to persue this.

    At the very least, he should be tried in the US, and even charged, but he should serve the sentence here, in a prison where he can see his family and he will be guaranteed the support that he needs.

    My main objection is to this one sided extradition treaty, though. I feel McKinnon is being unfairly treated and that the charges against him are too harsh for what he actually did - he'd probably face a fine and a suspended 6 month prison sentence if he was tried over here under UK law. I feel that the US are trying to make an example of a vulnerable man that, really, didn't exactly commit the crime of the century - anyone with a little computer knowledge could have done the same as him (and as McKinnon stated in that BBC interview, many others were doing), and this process is nothing more than torture - him not knowing his fate. His fear is not facing the courts - his fear is not knowing what the US authorities will do to him, and let's face it, they don't exactly have the greatest track record of late...
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    Default or null passwords. IIRC, he used a simple perl script to try them and managed to get into many servers containing classified materials.
    All on a 56k modem too! :awesome:

    Hacker Win! :rofl2:
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    A potential crime was committed on US territory. It should be up to the US to try it. I just hope that the US show mercy.

    At the end of the day, we signed an extradition Treaty. Yes the mechanics of it are crude, but its not a case of us being USA's ****: we can extradite people from the US as well.
    Not on the anywhere near the same terms, though, thanks to their constitution. And the fact the US State would actually fight to defend their own citizens, something our government seem incapable to do when it's Uncle Sam making the demands.
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    (Original post by dn013)
    If the US does not extradite him then what is to stop malicious hackers from hacking into US military computers from, say, Sudan - once they are caught Sudan could just say 'why should we extradite them when you the UK did not allow the extradition of Gary - is it special treatment?'
    Sudan doesn't give two craps about what the USA says and would never extradite it's citizens to the US anyway. Half of the countries members of parliament are wanted on genocide and crimes against humanity charges including the president. The US has been telling Sudan to stop the killings for years now, and have they listened? Nope.
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    (Original post by bananaslug77)
    He should be employed as an ethical hacker for software companies, or even better, for the US government. Who better to test your security than someone who has already succeeded in getting past it?
    I've said it before and I'll say it again;

    He ain't that good.
 
 
 
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