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Resolution 2009/10: Concerning education in developing countries Watch

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    Resolution 2009/10: Concerning education in developing countries

    Committee: Social Cultural and Humanitarian
    Submitted by: The World Bank and the Republic of Mauritius

    The General Assembly

    Noting that education is key in the continued growth of developing countries

    Deeply concerned with current education systems in developing countries

    1) Calls for more funding to relevant UN organizations, predominately the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the World Bank, and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

    2) Calls for the establishment of a global organization, under UNESCO, to encourage higher education institutes in developed countries to collaborate more with those in developing countries. Such an organization would sponsor (subsidize) collaboration.

    3) Encourages universities to make more scholarships, bursaries, loans and grants available for international students, so that the benefits of education in developed countries are not merely restricted to those who live in developed countries.

    4) Further encourages governments in developing countries to make education free. With increased funding for UNESCO, UNICEF and the World Bank, all three organizations can further help developing countries to provide education for free.

    5) Expresses hope that all nations give recognition for other nation’s qualifications. This will increase globalisation and international cooperation.

    6) Hopes that all nations will promote “education for all”, so that access to education is not restricted by ethnicity, gender, religion, money or race.
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    The DPRK has primary and secondary schools which are free for 10 years. They have mandatory attendance. We feel this is the best way to ensure education is available to all. Unfortunately the continual shortages of basic school supplies, shortages of textbooks and further degradation of school infrastructure including lack of adequate heating in schools during the long sub-zero winters mean that many are not attending, or are leaving once the 10 years of free education runs out.

    We would like to know what you mean when you say a 'developing nation'.


    China has 9 years of compulsory education, and feels that having free education is a necessity of as many nations as can afford to do so. We will support this.
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    The World Bank considers all low- and middles- income countries as "developing". We are also keen to help out the people of the DPRK. However, this is rather hard as we do not have a mission in the DPRK.

    [OOC]I'm not totally sure why, do you know Dayne?[/OOC]

    Education in China has developed hugely since the establishment of the People's Republic. We would like to congratulate the Chinese government for these achievements. However, we notice that, at a local level, education is still not always free and is consistently a major concern of many citizens. We hope to work with you on this problem and make education in China free both in theory and in practice.
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    The Portuguese Republic are very interested in this resolution, and unfortunately despite having 12 years compulsory education, the drop out rate is high, and we have one of the lowest literacy rates in Europe, something we are not proud of and are trying to improve.


    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    3) Encourages universities to charge lower tuition fees for international students, so that the benefits of education in developed countries are not merely restricted to those who live in developed countries.
    We are concerned that this may not necessarily be beneficial for universities in developing countries. Wouldn't it just detract people away from universities in their own countries, if the universities in other countries are better and more affordable?
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    (Original post by abc246)
    We are concerned that this may not necessarily be beneficial for universities in developing countries. Wouldn't it just detract people away from universities in their own countries, if the universities in other countries are better and more affordable?
    The problem is: at the moment, universities in countries such as the US or UK charge very high tuition fees for international students. Many of the world's best universities now are in those countries. This means only a very small portion for students from developing can afford them. We, the World Bank, want to make them more affordable and accessible to those in developing countries.

    We're not trying to make international universities more popular than universities in the host country. But, we want people in developing countries to have the same choice as those in developed countries. And to do so, universities will have to lower tuition fees.
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    Perhaps any country that is interested in this and/or can relate or apply to this bill could look at the age in which compulsory education finishes.

    Is the outcome for a child better if they are made to stay on in education until they are 18 rather than 16 better or would it depend on the willingness of the child to learn?
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    Estonia is in support of this resolution, and proud of the quality of its own education system which provides its students with one of the highest ratings for literacy and numeracy in the world.

    Estonia also believes that the development of technology provides more opportunities for education to cross borders far more easily, and that looking into ways that education institutions and government bodies in developed countries can use technology to assist countries still developing their level and standard of education, and that this will also assist the goals of mutually recognised qualifications. Estonia also believes that this would reduce the cost of higher level education by the possibility of forming relationships between institutions in developed and developing countries, allowing students to have more opportunities in their home nations.
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    The Republic of Turkey agrees with the aims of this treaty but is, like Portugal, unsure about lowering costs for international students. If universities in more developed nations were to offer the same price, then positions in the university would be taken up by international students who would then probably leave the state in the future. This can be unfair to citizens of a nation who allows international students this opportunity as this nation would, in the future, have less opportunities for its own tax-paying citizens. For this reason, perhaps providing funding and aid to local universities is a better option. Help other nations help themselves.
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    (Original post by taigan)
    The Republic of Turkey agrees with the aims of this treaty but is, like Portugal, unsure about lowering costs for international students. If universities in more developed nations were to offer the same price, then positions in the university would be taken up by international students who would then probably leave the state in the future. This can be unfair to citizens of a nation who allows international students this opportunity as this nation would, in the future, have less opportunities for its own tax-paying citizens. For this reason, perhaps providing funding and aid to local universities is a better option. Help other nations help themselves.
    The World Bank understands your predicament. However, we remind the representative from the Republic of Turkey that the resolution asks for "lower" tuitition fees but not "same price".
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    The Republic of Turkey understands that the resolution asks for "lower" tuition fees and not the same fees. Still, wouldn't this have the same result? International students would have more of an opportunity than they previously had and so they would take more places in universities leaving less for local citizens. However, as long as this does not occur too much than it shouldn't be an issue. The Republic of Turkey remains in favor of this treaty.
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    In kenya we have recently brought in free education for the first 12 years of a young person education - this takes our young people through both primary and secondary school. Like many other countries we do have an expensive Higher Education sector. We offer our thanks to the UK for their investment in our young people and wish that more could be done to make our education services available for all.

    We fully support this resolution.
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    Bulgaria recognises this resoultion and supports it.

    Education in Bulgaria

    Education in Bulgaria is overseen by the Ministry of Education and Science. Full-time education is mandatory for all children aged between 7 and 16. 6-year old children can be enrolled at school at their parents' discretion. Education at state-owned schools is free of charge. The curriculum of Bulgarian Educational system focuses on eight main subjects: Bulgarian language and Literature, foreign languages, mathematics, information technologies, social sciences and civics, natural sciences and ecology, music and art, physical education and sports. The school year starts on September 15 and ends in May or June depending on the grade level of the students. Classes meet five days a week and usually take two shifts (morning and afternoon). The school year is divided into two terms with Christmas, Easter and Summer Break. The grading system is based on numerals, where 6 is the highest and 2 is the lowest grade a student can obtain.

    In 2003 Bulgaria’s literacy rate was estimated at 98.6 percent, with approximately the same rate for both sexes. Bulgaria traditionally has had high educational standards.[1] In the post-communist era, low funding and low teacher morale have damaged the system somewhat, particularly in vocational training. Adherence to classical teaching methods has handicapped development in some technical fields. The current system of primary and secondary education, introduced in 1998, has 12 grades, in which attendance is compulsory from age seven through age 16. In 1998 enrollment in the primary grades was 93 percent of eligible students, and enrollment in the secondary grades was 81 percent of eligible students. The ratio of females to males in primary schools was 0.97, and the ratio in secondary schools was 0.98. Because of Bulgaria’s low birthrate, total primary- and secondary-school enrollment has decreased in the post-communist era, causing reductions in teaching staff and facilities. At the same time, the number of private schools increased by 10 times during the 1990s. Bulgaria’s higher education system was fully reorganized in the mid-1990s. Between 1995 and 2002, the number of university graduates increased from 33,000 to 50,000. In 2002 some 42 institutions of higher learning were in operation, and 215,700 students were enrolled. In 2003 some 4.9 percent of Bulgaria’s national budget was devoted to education.
    During the communist era, the Soviet Union had a great impact on Bulgarian educational system. A new form of education was brought in. Emphasis on liberal arts was replaced by increased technical training. In 1979 Zhivkov created the Unified Secondary Polytechnical School, which was a twelve-grade program focusing mainly on technical subjects. After the end of the Zhivkov Era, the Bulgarian educational system was completely reconstructed. The government sought to depolitisize the system and take the opinions of others into consideration.

    Guide to education in Bulgaria

    The education structure

    As you can see Bulgaria's education is on the rise, but we always strive to better it.
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    (Original post by taigan)
    The Republic of Turkey understands that the resolution asks for "lower" tuition fees and not the same fees. Still, wouldn't this have the same result? International students would have more of an opportunity than they previously had and so they would take more places in universities leaving less for local citizens. However, as long as this does not occur too much than it shouldn't be an issue. The Republic of Turkey remains in favor of this treaty.
    It may but we don't think it'll happen much. International students usually have to pay higher costs as they're not subsidized by the host country's government. Thus, the amount of money charged to international students is actually decided on by the universities themselves.

    Would the Republic of Turkey, and indeed other nations, be happier if these "cheaper" tuition fees came in the form of more scholarships/loans/grants/bursaries being made available to international students?
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    (Original post by bomberli)
    In kenya we have recently brought in free education for the first 12 years of a young person education - this takes our young people through both primary and secondary school. Like many other countries we do have an expensive Higher Education sector. We offer our thanks to the UK for their investment in our young people and wish that more could be done to make our education services available for all.

    We fully support this resolution.
    The World Bank is delighted, and congratulates, the progress made in Kenya. We also thank the United Kinghom for their support.
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    (Original post by Disco_Infern0)
    Bulgaria recognises this resoultion and supports it.

    Education in Bulgaria






    Guide to education in Bulgaria

    The education structure

    As you can see Bulgaria's education is on the rise, but we always strive to better it.
    The World Bank is happy to support Bulgaria in this, and we urge other nations to follow this sentiment.
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    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    It may but we don't think it'll happen much. International students usually have to pay higher costs as they're not subsidized by the host country's government. Thus, the amount of money charged to international students is actually decided on by the universities themselves.

    Would the Republic of Turkey, and indeed other nations, be happier if these "cheaper" tuition fees came in the form of more scholarships/loans/grants/bursaries being made available to international students?
    The Portuguese Republic feels this might work out better, as it would mean there was designated places for international students, and would not mean that local students would be fighting to get in over international students.
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    (Original post by abc246)
    The Portuguese Republic feels this might work out better, as it would mean there was designated places for international students, and would not mean that local students would be fighting to get in over international students.
    [OOC]ok. cool i'll just wait for approval/disapproval from other nations before changing it [/OOC]
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    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    The World Bank is delighted, and congratulates, the progress made in Kenya. We also thank the United Kinghom for their support.
    Kenya sincerely thanks the world bank for its support and hopes that all the worlds nations will support this wonderful opportunity to further education within their respective nations.
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    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    It may but we don't think it'll happen much. International students usually have to pay higher costs as they're not subsidized by the host country's government. Thus, the amount of money charged to international students is actually decided on by the universities themselves.

    Would the Republic of Turkey, and indeed other nations, be happier if these "cheaper" tuition fees came in the form of more scholarships/loans/grants/bursaries being made available to international students?
    The Republic of Turkey also agrees with this idea. It would mean less friction and difficulty for the whole process and is, therefore, a very good idea. Go for it!
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    (Original post by abc246)
    The Portuguese Republic feels this might work out better, as it would mean there was designated places for international students, and would not mean that local students would be fighting to get in over international students.
    (Original post by taigan)
    The Republic of Turkey also agrees with this idea. It would mean less friction and difficulty for the whole process and is, therefore, a very good idea. Go for it!
    [OOC] done [/OOC]
 
 
 
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