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    Hey,

    I posted here a couple of days ago, as I was rejected from an MSc programme because I had previously studied at an MSc level. Thus, if they would have accepted me I would have been classified to pay normal home fees, which in turn would have resulted in the uni loosing out on government funding (I think this is due to the ELQ policy) and they apparently would have had to come up for funding themselves rather than making me pay higher tuition fees.

    However, I've done some research online and from what I can gather you'd be classed as an ELQ student if you are currently holding an EQL qualification. However, as I do not currently hold an MSc degree, as I failed an exam and it's up to the exam board to decide whether I'll actually be awarded this degree, I am now wondering whether the ELQ policy would apply to me?

    I am sorry for bothering you guys again with this topic, but I'd be really thankful for any help.
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    I think you'll have to wait for the degree body from your first MSc to decide if they are going to pass you or not. If you fail, then you haven't got an ELQ situation, if you pass you have.

    I'm not sure why the second place feel they can't pass the fee element that won't be covered by the Government on to you. The paperwork advises that where possible establishments should try to pay the difference and I think last year at least, establishments were told they would not lose out funding if they had a lot of ELQ applicants. However, they can pass it on to the student if they want.
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    Avoiding ELQ fees for UK/EU students
    (October 2009)

    I've been looking at the information provided by the Unis and Gov body for this new ELQ arrangement and reached to the conclusion that having a previous degree puts you before two or three options:

    1. if you have an undergraduate degree sucha as Bachelor go for a higher degree such as a Master. ELQ doesn't apply if you go higher the previous degree.

    2. Look for courses/Unis/Colleges outside England, as far as I know new ELQ fees policy don't apply in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland only in England.: yes:

    3. If your choice does have an integrated Bachelor/Master 3+1 option why don't you apply for the Master since the beginning?

    4. If you are a disabled student or cared for it doesn't apply to you

    Please correct me if I'm wrong
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    (Original post by Gastapha)

    Avoiding ELQ fees for UK/EU students
    (October 2009)

    I've been looking at the information provided by the Unis and Gov body for this new ELQ arrangement and reached to the conclusion that having a previous degree puts you before two or three options:

    1. if you have an undergraduate degree sucha as Bachelor go for a higher degree such as a Master. ELQ doesn't apply if you go higher the previous degree.

    2. Look for courses/Unis/Colleges outside England, as far as I know new ELQ fees policy don't apply in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland only in England.: yes:

    3. If your choice does have an integrated Bachelor/Master 3+1 option why don't you apply for the Master since the beginning?

    4. If you are a disabled student or cared for it doesn't apply to you

    Please correct me if I'm wrong
    Well, you're not wrong, but to be honest, I don't think it's terribly helpful advice either...
    1) and 3) basically amount to saying "If you want to avoid paying ELQ fees, don't do an ELQ" - which is of course true (not to mention a bit of a truism), but I don't think you can rightly refer to them as options for someone who is actually in the situation of wanting / needing to do a second master's degree. 2) is a bit obvious, because the higher fees were caused by HEFCE funding being withdrawn, but depending on what their intended area of research is, people may not be able to rule out England completely. 4) is fair enough, but if you don't happen to be a disabled student, disability isn't really an "option", is it?
    So out of the four options you've listed, three aren't in fact options and one is an option which could potentially mean ruling out the most suitable courses.:dontknow:
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    You should consider this from two perspectives

    1. What is the ELQ policy itself;
    2. How has the policy been implemented at a particular institution.

    Very different unfortunately. From my reading of the policy documents and the applicable Parliamentary Hansard, it's the actual act of studying at a specific level (and not the granting of an award) that matters.

    However... each institution is in charge of interpreting, and reacting to the policy as it sees fit. Even within a specific institution you can be given wildly divergent advise. Many admissions tutors still do not even know of the policy and thereby just wave students in on the low fee even though the university has guidance on the website. Some lazy unis just don't want the hassle and reject the applications rather than considering the impact and possibly offering you a different fee.

    As far as advice goes... Gastapha is correct... if all else fails think about non-England courses, or unis that have chosen not to pass on the ELQ fee (I found at least a handful with a quick search). As some unis have not made the policy known/clear to admissions tutors you should keep applying to your preferred unis as chances are one may forget to charge you the ELQ fee.

    Of course, in the first instance, you should try and fight to have your existing application reviewed and make a plea based on the "no actual qualification awarded" angle... it's not a strong defence but they may not know better (which has been my experience).
 
 
 
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