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    As above
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    "Protect you"
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    ^^ nice joke

    It means: 'Honour the Gods'. A quote from San-Kim Yee's famous book: 'The Warrior King' (1883).
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    Presumably 君を守る?

    kimi is a pronoun for you (informal)
    wo is the object particle
    mamoru means to protect

    Swifty is right, though its hard to translate exactly as it doesn't exactly transcribe into english.

    To honour the gods would be something like kami wo mairu (神を参る) etc
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    (Original post by aKarma)
    kmi is a pronoun for you (informal)
    wo is the object particle
    mamoru means to protect

    Swifty is right
    Hey any info on your sig?
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    Why do you ask OP?
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    (Original post by Usar)
    Hey any info on your sig?
    The bubble?

    I just stumbled it as a gif, but it appears to come from here http://videos.howstuffworks.com/disc...urst-video.htm (and in turn that came from Time Warp)
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    Thanks!
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    (Original post by aKarma)
    Presumably 君を守る?

    kimi is a pronoun for you (informal)
    wo is the object particle
    mamoru means to protect

    Swifty is right, though its hard to translate exactly as it doesn't exactly transcribe into english.

    To honour the gods would be something like kami wo mairu (神を参る) etc
    気味を守る - to protect a feeling
    黄身を守る - to guard the yolk of an egg.

    edit: incidentally, kimi - in its archaic usage can mean 'ruler' or king' - so it can be 'to protect the king' heh
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    (Original post by guy_incognito)
    気味を守る - to protect a feeling
    黄身を守る - to guard the yolk of an egg.

    臍で茶を沸かす
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    (Original post by aKarma)
    臍で茶を沸かす
    (笑) いいことだよ。長時間日本語を勉強しただけのことはあるね。 普通にそういう意味は分からないのに。。。 :hmmm:
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    (Original post by guy_incognito)
    (笑) いいことだよ。長時間日本語を勉強しただけのことはあるね。 普通にそういう意味は分からないのに。。。 :hmmm:
    Not surprising really; it's a kotowaza (japanese proverb)
    Without knowing that, 'to boil tea on a belly button' is a bit wtf :p:

    It basically means a silly or pointless task
    You'd say it if you saw someone trying to build a house of card on a windy day. :woo:

    EDIT: I'd said it because guarding a yoke seemed weird at the time. I suppose it makes sense in a cooking context
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    (Original post by aKarma)
    Not surprising really; it's a kotowaza (japanese proverb)
    Without knowing that 'to boil tea on a belly button' is a bit wtf :p:

    It basically means a silly or pointless task
    You'd say it if you saw someone trying to build a house of card on a windy day. :woo:
    Yeah, I know it. Your meaning is wrong though. If you put tea in someone's belly button and boil it, they'll basically do this ---> :rofl:

    It means to be something of an absolute joke or something that is so funny that it causes oneself to lose control.

    Its in my big bad book of Japanese proverbs (which incidentally is pink and cream.) I just didn't recognise the kanji, because they aren't used in Japanese normally unless you want to be a fancypants and show off. :hmmm:
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    (Original post by guy_incognito)
    Yeah, I know it. Your meaning is wrong though. If you put tea in someone's belly button and boil it, they'll basically do this ---> :rofl:
    No it doesn't, but it does mean this
    It means to be something of an absolute joke or something that is so funny that it causes oneself to lose control.
    or thereabouts (as i said) eg

    ... aren't used in Japanese normally unless you want to be a fancypants and show off. :hmmm:
    Good old ime+ spacebar:p:

    EDIT: Thinking about it, I have no idea of the actual origins so the whole someone laughing because the tea was on their belly could be right. I had always supposed it was the act of boiling (read trying) tea on someone else's belly button that was laughable but have never actually been explicitly told afaik.
    sarumokikaraochirukana:shy2:
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    i'm more of a russian myself...gimme yo money
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    (Original post by cactus kid :))
    Why do you ask OP?
    My friend said it to me, and he won't tell me what it means & I can't find it on the internet anywhere! :eek3:
 
 
 
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