Radiology Watch

zafaru123
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Hello, sorry if this has been posted before, but the threads i found were pretty useless. Anyway, currently I'm studying for my a-levels, i'm taking maths, further maths, chemistry, physics and economics. At A2 i'll be taking all except economics. I'm hoping to become a radiologist sometime in the future.
For an undergrad. degree, i wanna take physics. Does anyone know exactly what i need to take at postgrad. level to become a radiologist, or is it not possible to become one, once i've taken physics as an undergrad.
Thanks very much.
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Hygeia
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(Original post by zafaru123)
Hello, sorry if this has been posted before, but the threads i found were pretty useless. Anyway, currently I'm studying for my a-levels, i'm taking maths, further maths, chemistry, physics and economics. At A2 i'll be taking all except economics. I'm hoping to become a radiologist sometime in the future.
For an undergrad. degree, i wanna take physics. Does anyone know exactly what i need to take at postgrad. level to become a radiologist, or is it not possible to become one, once i've taken physics as an undergrad.
Thanks very much.
A radiologist is a doctor so requires a medical degree (5/6yr MBBS/MBChB etc) and the standard post grad training (F1/F2) then is a specialism. Grad entry courses (4 years) also exist and some accept any degree so if you really wanted to do a physics degree you could do that and then go for a medicine as a graduate. Though that is a long route.

A radiographer also requires a specific degree in either therapeutic or diagnostic radiography. For more info have a look here.
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zafaru123
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(Original post by Hygeia)
A radiologist is a doctor so requires a medical degree (5/6yr MBBS/MBChB etc) and the standard post grad training (F1/F2) then is a specialism. Grad entry courses (4 years) also exist and some accept any degree so if you really wanted to do a physics degree you could do that and then go for a medicine as a graduate. Though that is a long route.

A radiographer also requires a specific degree in either therapeutic or diagnostic radiography. For more info have a look here.
I'm hoping to do a course in physics/medical physics, and from there do grad entry med. I don't think i really stand a chance at undergrad. entry, and therefore have decided to take this 'long route'
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Huw Davies
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(Original post by zafaru123)
I'm hoping to do a course in physics/medical physics, and from there do grad entry med. I don't think i really stand a chance at undergrad. entry, and therefore have decided to take this 'long route'
Graduate entry medicine is much more competitive than ordinary medical degrees - additionally, your access to loans etc. is limited. If your intention is definitely to be a doctor of any kind, I'd be wary of taking this route. A physics degree may not meet the requirements of some GEP course, though some are more flexible.

What are your reasons for thinking you don't stand a chance for undergraduate medicine? A number of universities would take you with the A-levels you're doing, and you can build up some work experience\caring experience from now, taking a gap year if necessary.

If all you're interested in is the radiology side of things, bear in mind that medicine courses of all kinds cover all of medicine\surgery, as do at the first two years of your job. And radiology was one of the most competitive specialties in 2008 so you might have to be prepared to do something else.
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belis
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What attracts you to radiology in particular? Is it the physics and technical side ot it? If so than you may be more intrested in radiography. There is a bonus from financial point of view there as fees for this course are covered by the NHS and you may qualify for a bursary. Plus you can still apply for most grad entry medical course with radiography degree.
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zafaru123
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(Original post by Huw Davies)
Graduate entry medicine is much more competitive than ordinary medical degrees - additionally, your access to loans etc. is limited. If your intention is definitely to be a doctor of any kind, I'd be wary of taking this route. A physics degree may not meet the requirements of some GEP course, though some are more flexible.

What are your reasons for thinking you don't stand a chance for undergraduate medicine? A number of universities would take you with the A-levels you're doing, and you can build up some work experience\caring experience from now, taking a gap year if necessary.

If all you're interested in is the radiology side of things, bear in mind that medicine courses of all kinds cover all of medicine\surgery, as do at the first two years of your job (don't know how specialty training for radiology works in the new system, but back in the day entry was following a few additional years of general medicine\surgery and MRCP/MRCS IIRC).
I got A*A*AAAABBBB at GCSE and even though I'm most likely to get 4/5 A's at AS-level, i don't offer biology where as most students do.
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Huw Davies
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(Original post by zafaru123)
I got A*A*AAAABBBB at GCSE and even though I'm most likely to get 4/5 A's at AS-level, i don't offer biology where as most students do.
There's at least half a dozen universities that don't ask for biology (when I applied, Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester, Bristol, Southampton, Leeds, but that was quite a while ago now). I'm not sure what GCSEs are required but yours don't look terrible (higher grades probably better to be in the sciences). The competition at grad entry level is a lot worse.
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zafaru123
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(Original post by Huw Davies)
There's at least half a dozen universities that don't ask for biology (when I applied, Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester, Bristol, Southampton, Leeds, but that was quite a while ago now). I'm not sure what GCSEs are required but yours don't look terrible (higher grades probably better to be in the sciences). The competition at grad entry level is a lot worse.
the number one thing putting me off is that someone in year 13, who got 10 A*'s and 2 A's at gcse, with 4 A's at AS, predicted 4 A's, got rejected from all uni's he applied to. I just don't want the same to happen to me, and my grades aren't as good.
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belis
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(Original post by zafaru123)
the number one thing putting me off is that someone in year 13, who got 10 A*'s and 2 A's at gcse, with 4 A's at AS, predicted 4 A's, got rejected from all uni's he applied to. I just don't want the same to happen to me, and my grades aren't as good.
It's not all about grades. I recomend this thread as a starting point: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=391050
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Huw Davies
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(Original post by zafaru123)
the number one thing putting me off is that someone in year 13, who got 10 A*'s and 2 A's at gcse, with 4 A's at AS, predicted 4 A's, got rejected from all uni's he applied to. I just don't want the same to happen to me, and my grades aren't as good.
There's a lot more to medicine applications than grades, and from the looks of it those weren't the reason this person was rejected. The GCSE grades are better than mine were!
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Sarky
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(Original post by zafaru123)
the number one thing putting me off is that someone in year 13, who got 10 A*'s and 2 A's at gcse, with 4 A's at AS, predicted 4 A's, got rejected from all uni's he applied to. I just don't want the same to happen to me, and my grades aren't as good.
You're basing your whole career and university choices on just one person being rejected?

I really suggest you do some reading around the medicine part of this forum. You'll soon learn so that at least you can make an informed decision.
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No Future
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(Original post by zafaru123)
the number one thing putting me off is that someone in year 13, who got 10 A*'s and 2 A's at gcse, with 4 A's at AS, predicted 4 A's, got rejected from all uni's he applied to. I just don't want the same to happen to me, and my grades aren't as good.
you stand more chance of being rejected postgrad. just friggin apply for undergrad. at least try! the worst that can happen is you get rejected and gain some interview experience
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Philosoraptor
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Well we have a physics graduate on our UNDERGRAD (i.e. 5/6 year course).
But I mean if you intend to be a doctor then apply now?

That or if the role of radiographer interests you - do that!
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