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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    You can transfer between any year really. Unless like me and Robbie, you are tied to one place by your course.
    Many unis specify you have to have done at least 50% of your degree at the awarding institution.
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    You can transfer between any year really. Unless like me and Robbie, you are tied to one place by your course.
    Why does your course tie you?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    No but you can do the 3rd/4th year elsewhere.

    I missed the MChem mark after year two so moved into year three at another uni where the arbitrary cut off was lower.
    I've been wanting to know this for a while. I'm signed into the MChem course at Manchester and going to my 3rd year starting Sept. If I make the requirment, do I still have to re-apply at the same Uni for it or will they automatically take me since it's the course I've signed to at the beggining?
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    You can transfer between any year really. Unless like me and Robbie, you are tied to one place by your course.
    Hmm, it just doesn't quite add up though. Universities have different weightings for second/third/fourth years. For instance, Nottingham's MMath is 2: 4: 4 for years 2, 3 and 4 respectively, but Durham's is 2: 3: 4... So someone moving from Nottingham to Durham would essentially devalue their second and third year marks (from being 3/5 of their degree to just 5/9) which, although useful if someone wanted to dilute the effect of bad marks, doesn't seem like something that would be allowed to happen.

    Very odd.
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    You are right that those boundaries are frustrating - but their has to be a cutoff at some point. If it was 59%, then the 58% people will complain etc etc. Sure, you got good A levels, but then, we could have the arguement that if you was considered for shortlisting over someone who got a 1st who had worse A levels - why was he excluded merely due to somthing he studied 3-5 years ago? etc etc vicious cycle. At the end, their are too many people with good grades, good 2:1's and 1sts and they don't have the time to properly interview every single person who applies or the HR costs would be astronomical.

    If you get thousands of applications, I mean, some boundaries will have to be put. I know it sucks, but if you think about it, 60% isn't exactly a very high percentage to get... Granted you say you had circumstances, but my brother who just recently graduated at KCL for Maths + Physics, with lesser grades than you, seemed to have been very lazy, very very lazy and still managed a 2:1 even after failing a module - is it really that hard? :shrug:
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    (Original post by elsa_89)
    Hmm, it just doesn't quite add up though.

    Universities have different weightings for second/third/fourth years. For instance, Nottingham's MMath is 2: 4: 4 for years 2, 3 and 4 respectively, but Durham's is 2: 3: 4... So someone moving from Nottingham to Durham would essentially devalue their second and third year marks - from being 3/5 of their degree to just 5/9 (which is useful if someone wanted to dilute the effect of bad marks say)...

    Very odd.
    I'm not kidding

    The weightings were out by 5% for the second year 30% as opposed to 25% but that was a big deal. Some courses count the first year, it doesn't mean you cant transfer from them after the 1st year.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    I'm not kidding

    The weightings were out by 5% for the second year 30% as opposed to 25% but that was a big deal. Some courses count the first year, it doesn't mean you cant transfer from them after the 1st year.
    I stand corrected, Quades. Thank you for enlightening me. :moon:
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    (Original post by elsa_89)
    Meh, the system is flawed. If I were in the OP's position and found out that someone with a 2:1 in Business Management from Liverpool had gotten the job whose offer I missed by 1% in an MSc NatSci from Durham, I would want to kill the other graduate (and the employers...and everyone else ).
    WHat do you have against Liverpool?

    Someone with a business based degree of 2.1 standard from a Redbrick will obviously take priority over the same person if they got a 2.2 in a non-business degree. Most grad schemes look for regular BA/BSc of 2.1 standard because they just want to know you can pass the professional exams. Doing a masters in finance in pointless for this exact reason. It's all about professional qualifications and a masters isn't one of those.

    Best advice I can give is ringing their graduate recruitment departments and offer them a reference along with the application, from a lecturer who believes you have the ability for a 2.1 standard. If you put 2.2 you'll be auto-filtered.
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    Ah more scientists spending 3 years of irrelevant stuff to become an accountant.
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    (Original post by tomheppy)
    Ah more scientists spending 3 years of irrelevant stuff to become an accountant.
    5?

    Procurement at the mo after a stint in innovation.
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    Have you thought about the NHS graduate scheme - they accept graduates with 2:2 degrees and have opportunities in finance, hr, general management.
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    (Original post by JCM89)
    Have you thought about the NHS graduate scheme - they accept graduates with 2:2 degrees and have opportunities in finance, hr, general management.
    Whats the applicationslaces ratio like?

    As bad as fast stream?
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    Failing to get a 2:1 or above is often career suicide at the moment I'm afraid
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    (Original post by RobbieC)
    I am academically pretty strong. I received 6 A2 level A grades and an A at AS level, with strong GCSEs. I went to Durham University and did an MSci in Natural Sciences (Chemistry and Physics) and was officially awarded a 2:2 for my troubles (though the grade is under review due to the University failing to account for a doctors letter excusing me from one of my assignments).

    Nonetheless, in my current situation having a 2:2, despite my superb A-level grades and the fact that I am actually a smart and personable guy, I am finding it exceptionally difficult to even find interesting jobs where I can use my skills that do not simply say... "minimum 2:1 honours degree in numerate subject". I cannot tell you how sick I am of hearing that. I mean it fails to take into account the quality of said degree or institution... It all seems really quite ridiculous... but I know if I applied, most of them would not even give my application a second glance, however well I wrote it.

    Am I missing something, is there a way to get onto the career ladder in financial work with a 2:2 degree... or was the last 4 years a rather serious waste of time.

    It just feels terrible.

    Start thinking outside the box, yes you've got a 2.2 and that in most situations will count against you for grad schemes.

    HOWEVER....not everyone in the finance sector needs a 2.1. Start thinking about EXACTLY what you wish to pursue, finance is such a general term, start to think specifically.

    Take some time to sit down and plan your future. How can you reach your intended destination without a map of how you'll get there? too many graduates make this mistake, complain they have no job BUT when asked 'what is it that you want' they have no idea.

    Get involved in your local community, volunteer, network etc

    Gain some work experience, be proactive..
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    (Original post by Stomm)
    Well a 2:1 is still a 2:1, and a 2:2 is still a 2:2, regardless of where its from. And anyway all good graduate recruitment schemes are institution blind, which does of course mean that there are a heck of a lot of bad ones out there as they will only accept applications from university careers fairs that they've actually visited, etc...
    Don't think that is true. or even whether it should be true...
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Why does your course tie you?
    Because its very difficult to directly transfer, we both do combined honours in science.
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    (Original post by elsa_89)
    Hmm, it just doesn't quite add up though. Universities have different weightings for second/third/fourth years. For instance, Nottingham's MMath is 2: 4: 4 for years 2, 3 and 4 respectively, but Durham's is 2: 3: 4... So someone moving from Nottingham to Durham would essentially devalue their second and third year marks (from being 3/5 of their degree to just 5/9) which, although useful if someone wanted to dilute the effect of bad marks, doesn't seem like something that would be allowed to happen.

    Very odd.
    The best trick is to move to the Open University, you can forget your 1st two years and only have the final one count towards the BSc.

    You also assume that universities care about the accuracy of degree marking, where as long as the degrees fit some kind of distribution, they are happy. Makes degrees very arbitrary and not so much about merit (imo they place way too much stead on hard work rather than actual ability)
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    (Original post by Chrrye)
    Don't think that is true. or even whether it should be true...
    Only one that I actually know of that is institution blind, hence why there are an awful lot of bad ones out there...
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    (Original post by Apagg)
    Wrong

    Well that's odd, as 2:2 still says "I went out and drank too much, or I'm actually rather thick" to me regardless of where you get it from...


    As to getting a 3rd, well what was the point exactly in getting into that much debt? If you're going to **** up like that, at least do the decent thing and crash off after your first year. Just like I did the first time around as it happens
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    Robbie, you dead set on doing finance? I know that the company I work for (in the Oil Industry), and the DSTL, to name just two, take people with 2:2 MSci from Durham.
 
 
 
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