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    ...I'm sitting here with Helene Cixious's essay at my side. Seven pages to go.

    We were MEANT to read that one, right? Actually, don't worry; I'll just look up the letter. It's just I've bookmarked and read a good number of the feminist (or related) texts already. S'easier to read criticism when you're interested, of course. Maybe it's because I'm from an all-girls' school. This is the thing; I've been enjoying the critical essays, just not the ones I'm supposed to be reading! xD

    Also have another critical book with a beeeaautiful green marble cover (it's got a counterpart in blue I ought to keep an eye out for - am kicking self for not indulging when I saw it secondhand two years back) with another of Freud's essays in. The creative writing and daydreaming one. I've read The Uncanny before, I think... or at least an excerpt from it.

    Ah, yes. We had the short story discussion. : ) It's an example of just how varied tastes can be! Along with Beowulf, I found them the easiest things to get under my belt!
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    Oh, look, a clue about what we're likely to be studying first. This is from the undergraduate handbook on the department website here.

    (Original post by Approaches to Literature description)
    This is an integrated programme of tutorials, seminars and lectures. Lectures follow a cumulative formal sequence – poetry, narrative, drama, film – which is mirrored in the sequence of texts studied in the seminars. There is no standard reading list, but each year the course tutors agree on a number of common texts. The common texts are listed in a letter sent out in good time to all incoming First Years. The course carries 40 credits.
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    I've just had a 'no I really must read them today' morning with the theory and criticism, and my thoughts are thus:

    1) O Shelley, I hate thee. WHY???? Couldn't Mary have kicked some sense into you?

    2) Sidney, you're life sounds waaay more interesting than anything that you have written here.

    3) Freud actually becomes interesting once you pretend to ignore the fact that he believes everything is to do with sex, and actually see what he's trying to say about language.

    4) Benjamin is a philosopher stuck in a literary theory book.

    5) Cixous is a genius and I bow down before her.

    That's as far as I've got, only Said's Orientalism and Eagleton's The Rise of English to go.

    BUT - I did find a beautiful essay by Hayden White about Historical Narrative, which I :heart: and spent about two hours going over, wasting a great deal of time.

    What are other people's thoughts? Don't worry if you disagree, I don't bite :yep:
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    ...And now it strikes me that I don't remember much but the vaguest hint from the critical essays. xD;

    Sidney has taught me that I really ought to get into the classic-classics, and that being to-the-point is a virtue. Amongst the talk about horsemanship and long strings of words, it was hard to pick out the point. Which I think was poetry is virtuous. Or makes people feel virtuous, strive to virtue.

    Shelley, I know YOU'RE going to be unnecessarily verbose because I've seen Mary's text before you dipped your quill in the ink well. (Not that I don't believe Mary agreed with most of his alterations - I personally subscribe to the idea that he acted as editor and adviser, and Mary was happy for his help, though the bare bones of the ideas were her own.)

    Freud, hello you fruitloop, what are you going to accuse my gender (who you claim not to understand, I might add!) of this time? I read the excerpt from The Interpretation of Dreams, and re-read The Uncanny (which I enjoyed), AND Fetishism, then went and found the one about Creative Writing and Daydreamers. I agree with you: when you take what he's writing and relate it to, say, the formation of convincing (and unsettling imagery), narrative in general, it makes sense. About the workings of the human psyche, he's in Cloudcuckooland. Still, founding father of psychology - if it weren't for him, we wouldn't be where we are today, got to hand it to him.

    Benjamin I need to re-read. *sigh*

    Cixous I finished last night, and I share your opinion there as well. She was pretty verbose as well, but her use of language was creative and beautiful (whereas I struggled to get my head around Sidney's.)

    And I like Eagleton as well - probably the most accessible (though, I think my preference for him comes from something he wrote about Wuthering Heights). The historical side of English as a course was interesting.
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    You know the email we got telling us about our Approaches to Literature Teaching Groups? I've got Ms. Adrienne Odasso, Group 12 - anyone else got that? There are 3 catherines and 3 elizabeths in that group (how confusing?!) and only one guy (I feel sorry for him!)

    How are these groups different from our seminar groups that we got on our timetable?

    Argh, my timetables gone again. I had Toddy - I think that's group 10?
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    Which of the essay's were compulsary reading, may I ask?
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    I read that Sidney essay last night. Christ.

    (Original post by (parentheses)
    You know the email we got telling us about our Approaches to Literature Teaching Groups? I've got Ms. Adrienne Odasso, Group 12 - anyone else got that? There are 3 catherines and 3 elizabeths in that group (how confusing?!) and only one guy (I feel sorry for him!)

    How are these groups different from our seminar groups that we got on our timetable?

    Argh, my timetables gone again. I had Toddy - I think that's group 10?
    I saw that! Not envying that situation at all... Just having one other Emily in my classes confuses me, let alone there being three.

    There was only one guy in my AS literature class when we studied Carol Ann Duffy. He spent all year sleeping in the corner and occasionally woke up to fend off my teacher's blatant feminism and Duffy's hatred of males, haha.

    I've just perved on all the seminar class lists. There's some awesome surnames kicking about in our year... There's someone in my seminar called Ziggy as well. I am relieved that I'm the only Emily.
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    ^ This is a curious thing. Or at least, I think it is. We did a lot - and I mean, a lot - of feminist criticism at my sixth form. Even our core texts - The Rover, Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein, The Woman in Black - seemed to revolved about women and women's place in society. Because it was an all-girls' school, I suppose they thought we'd emphathise and therefore get more into it (thus get better grades, thus boost the school's rep */cynic*). I think about half of our coursework questions (in both years) focused on women as well. I was left wondering whether the feminist side of things was over-represented in our school, and whether if I'd been in a co-ed one, things would have been different.

    Heck, I didn't mind; I love that side of things - questioning gender fascinates me. Which is why I'm going to ask all you creative bods in this thread a question. If you do write creatively, or if you ever invent characters for sheer pleasure and entertaining diversion, have you ever created a male (or female, if you're male xD!) alter-ego? It says in the short biography at the beginning of my Daphne du Maurier novels, that "she even created a male alter-ego". That "even" makes me roll my eyes every time, because it has the effect making it sound uncommon or unusual. Whereas I've met at least two other people who live in my part of the country who've created male, inverted versions of themselves. There's a "Manself" meme on DeviantArt. I wouldn't dare write about mine, because he's more like mental modeling clay to prod and squish, and hasn't any serious character potential in his present form. So please don't think me utterly batty!

    S'pose if we were running with the feminist vein we could say this is longing after patriarchal power.

    Ugh, anyway. I've concluded I'm going to have to go back at some point and re-read and write summaries of the criticisms.

    They ones they advise reading (I think it's more as a good starting place/introduction than compulsory, electro) are as copy and pasted:

    • Sidney, ‘An Apology for Poetry’. 1580
    • Shelley, ‘A Defence of Poetry’. 1821
    • Freud, ‘The Uncanny’. 1919
    • Benjamin, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’. 1936
    • Cixous, ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’. 1975.
    • Said, ‘Orientalism’. 1981
    • Eagleton, ‘The Rise of English’. 1983

    I've only got Shelley left to go, but, as mentioned, the filing cabinet's been locked and the key's gone missing. My memory recall is either broken, or I didn't take much in to begin with!
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    (Original post by Chaiteafairy)
    ^ This is a curious thing. Or at least, I think it is. We did a lot - and I mean, a lot - of feminist criticism at my sixth form. Even our core texts - The Rover, Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein, The Woman in Black - seemed to revolved about women and women's place in society. Because it was an all-girls' school, I suppose they thought we'd emphathise and therefore get more into it (thus get better grades, thus boost the school's rep */cynic*). I think about half of our coursework questions (in both years) focused on women as well. I was left wondering whether the feminist side of things was over-represented in our school, and whether if I'd been in a co-ed one, things would have been different.
    I assume that you did A Levels, as I did the IB and my course was completely different! :yep:
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    I did do A-levels, yes. x3

    But I assume there's the same sort of variation in syllabus content choice in the IB as there is for A-levels?
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    Hello everyone

    I'm in Group 5 with Dr McAllister, anyone else? Just started slightly panicking because he has set us to read 2 books that weren't on the main reading list, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and Paradise Lost by Milton...

    As for reading, I've read most of the things on the list but I think I might to read them again in order to be able to talk about them in an even slightly intelligent way :P Summer has turned my brain to mush.
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    (Original post by DizzyLizzy)
    Hello everyone

    I'm in Group 5 with Dr McAllister, anyone else? Just started slightly panicking because he has set us to read 2 books that weren't on the main reading list, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and Paradise Lost by Milton...

    As for reading, I've read most of the things on the list but I think I might to read them again in order to be able to talk about them in an even slightly intelligent way :P Summer has turned my brain to mush.
    ...:eek:

    One week before the start of term? I'm not in that group, but how did you even find this out? Did your tutor e-mail you and tell you? It seems a bit unfair if it's only you lot with the extra 2 texts!

    If this happens to me I'll start weeping. Loveeeee Paradise Lost, though.
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    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    ...:eek:

    One week before the start of term? I'm not in that group, but how did you even find this out? Did your tutor e-mail you and tell you? It seems a bit unfair if it's only you lot with the extra 2 texts!

    If this happens to me I'll start weeping. Loveeeee Paradise Lost, though.
    I know!! I happened to stumble across this page http://www.york.ac.uk/depts/engl/ug/...ists/Au_09.htm on the website and checked his list...glad I did :o:

    I don't know if other groups have different books, but I'm glad you like Paradise Lost, looking forward to getting stuck into it!
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    ...I'm in group 10. I've already studied HoD for exams (it isn't a long read; just a bit tedious since he keeps bloody repeating himself) - read the Achebe criticism in the anthology, if you really want to get ahead of your game. x3 Heck, I'd bring you my copy of Things Fall Apart...

    Have Paradise Lost (reeaally want the Dore illustrated version for that as well! xD) but haven't gotten round to reading it.

    Ooh! Found mine! We're doing extracts from PL as well. : D

    God damn, I don't believe I spent about ten minutes looking at that page earlier to day and didn't think to click my tutor. *slaps forehead* *goes to print list*
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    @Rainbow - I wouldn't worry that we're only getting this a week before the start of term; it doesn't look that anything heavy, and I'm sure if they wanted us to have read it, they would have said. ;3 The extra bits of reading are all on a timetable for the first term (at least on mine...) with a little tag saying we may need to do extra stuff to keep up with the lectures anyway.

    It's going to be odd focussing on something different every week instead of one thing intensely over a term! But at least you don't have chance to get bored. xD

    *kicks feet* I wish HoD was on mine, though. I love that novella because I hate it, which always seems to provide a ready source of essay-fuel.
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    Why doesn't my tutor have any of the meet up at such-and-such a time grumble grumble grumble I'm in group 2 if anyone cares

    In addition am I the only one who finds Cixous' essay interminably dull?
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    (Original post by Bambi2803)
    Why doesn't my tutor have any of the meet up at such-and-such a time grumble grumble grumble I'm in group 2 if anyone cares
    I'm in Group 2 :yep: You're the first other person I've found from our group. And yeah, we have no information. So I guess we don't have to read extra books? Well, Victoria Coulson sounds nice. I.. don't really know why..
    I thought I'd prefer Group 7 or 8 because of the free days, but I've got a good feeling about VC :rolleyes:
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    Awesome if you want add me on facebook I'm the Michael in that group. I have a good feeling too. Just bought a george foreman grill, selected poems of ezra pound and 2kg of protein powder so all is right with the world
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    (Original post by Bambi2803)
    Why doesn't my tutor have any of the meet up at such-and-such a time grumble grumble grumble I'm in group 2 if anyone cares

    In addition am I the only one who finds Cixous' essay interminably dull?
    Group 2 Yay!! Now we make three!! I was thinking- after the 1st seminar do you guys want to grab something to drink? Seeing as we'll be together for a year it'd be a good idea to get to know each other!! xx
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    (Original post by Chaiteafairy)
    ^ This is a curious thing. Or at least, I think it is. We did a lot - and I mean, a lot - of feminist criticism at my sixth form. Even our core texts - The Rover, Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein, The Woman in Black - seemed to revolved about women and women's place in society. Because it was an all-girls' school, I suppose they thought we'd emphathise and therefore get more into it (thus get better grades, thus boost the school's rep */cynic*). I think about half of our coursework questions (in both years) focused on women as well. I was left wondering whether the feminist side of things was over-represented in our school, and whether if I'd been in a co-ed one, things would have been different.

    have you ever created a male (or female, if you're male xD!) alter-ego? It says in the short biography at the beginning of my Daphne du Maurier novels, that "she even created a male alter-ego". That "even" makes me roll my eyes every time, because it has the effect making it sound uncommon or unusual. Whereas I've met at least two other people who live in my part of the country who've created male, inverted versions of themselves. There's a "Manself" meme on DeviantArt. I wouldn't dare write about mine, because he's more like mental modeling clay to prod and squish, and hasn't any serious character potential in his present form. So please don't think me utterly batty!

    S'pose if we were running with the feminist vein we could say this is longing after patriarchal power.
    Yo yo, C'fairy, I went to a state school and we did Heart of Darkness too- focused on the modernist side of things and compared it with the Waste Land- I'm sorry, but kill me now. Or then.
    So I'm not sure if the feminism was overplayed at your school- I can tell you now though, nothing was even "played" at my school, let alone overplayed. The teaching was terrible, they set us on the wrong syllabus and told us about 2 months before the exam- it was pretty terrible. But no one seemed that interested... About 5 in my class got an A. *shudder* Anyway, let's not get in to bad teaching or the message will never end with all my horror stories. And in defence of state schools, the History teacher was amazing- but she taught us how to play the game, unlike everyone else.

    As for the writing, I seem to have taken 2 gap years now to write and I suppose the main character is a guy (I'm not, by the way, just realised my name thingy doesn't say). But I think my mind is mucked up. Example: I hate it when audiobooks are read by women, I can NEVER get into them. But that said, I've realised it's not me sterotyping- 1) they always make women read Jane Austen, who I HATE and 2) I just saw Fiona Shaw at the National Theatre and she was incredible, so women aren't **** (HAHAhahaha! Sorry, it's so funny). I meant at acting.
    There's obviously some Freud thing going on that my mind won't let me access. But I would ALWAYS choose to write from a male perspective. My women ALWAYS end up being gibbering losers who whine all the time. But I've been working on that. My sister says it happens to her too. I think I can't write a strong female--- jeez, I don't know why. I've been trying to think for like, five mins. Help me Chaitefairy! Oh, and I'm not a wreck, to those others in group 2. You'll find I'm extremely loud and opinionated, unlike my heroines..
 
 
 
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