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    Well I read Beowulf 2 years ago...... and i've seen the anthony hopkins film.... that's the extent of my reading thus far. I shall do a blitz in September methinks. Any other boys studying English. We should form a crib
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    (Original post by Bambi2803)
    Well I read Beowulf 2 years ago...... and i've seen the anthony hopkins film.... that's the extent of my reading thus far. I shall do a blitz in September methinks. Any other boys studying English. We should form a crib
    Ah good, our numbers are on the increase.
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    (Original post by Chaiteafairy)

    And quick discussion question, where does everyone like to read? I go and sit in the garden when I can.
    I'm on holiday at the moment, so under a straw umbrella on a grassy area just off the beach. The sea breeze does sometimes put me to sleep though, so perhaps that's not the most productive option out there
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    I like to read curled up in bed, sat on my windowsill when it's raining, or in a secluded spot on a hill in my local park.
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    I'd LOVE a windowsill I could curl up on.

    *stretches* M'going on a bike ride, then I'm going to curl up with the American short stories, which I'm just thrilled to bits with (I have a weird... thing - how eloquent - for American Literature, without having any desire to have anything to do with the country ever again whatsoever).

    Anyone else short story - and not just out text - mad? Favourites?
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    The only one I've read so far is Rip Van Winkle, lol. Failure. To be fair, I took the book to the park and finished that one, then it suddenly got SO cold and windy so I went home. Are we expected to read them all?

    I'm not really that big on short stories if I'm honest but my favourite without a doubt would be Joyce's The Dead from Dubliners. I love it so much. Like I said, though, I'm not that keen so given the choice I'd rather have a novel. I studied Kate Chopin's short stories along with her novel The Awakening for AS and didn't like them at all, so I suppose that sort of put me off, but Dubliners is amaaziiing.
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    Read Saki. His short stories are ridiculously funny and true especially re: women
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    I'm not sure... It would have been useful to have had a list of suggestions as for the critical side (btw, I scribbled all over Freud), as well as one for particular poems, so we could have at least done a sort of checklist.

    Personally, I'm alright, because I'd happily take short stories with the same enthusiasm as a novel, if not more.

    Daphne du Maurier in particular is good.
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    bloody hell i just ordered all my books 2nd hand off amazon those norton ones cost a fair bit eh?
    They should arrive tomorrow. Can't wait to get stuck in. Long live my inner/outer geekiness
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    (Original post by Bambi2803)
    bloody hell i just ordered all my books 2nd hand off amazon those norton ones cost a fair bit eh?
    They should arrive tomorrow. Can't wait to get stuck in. Long live my inner/outer geekiness
    I ordered most of ebay ^^ and got them all for under £70. well i didn't get one but thats only because it cost over £90.
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    god I really need to get ordering... I've only just finished sorting out accom and student finance! What's everyone applied for college-wise? I applied for Derwent, but did consider Langwith because of it's proximity to the department!
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    I'm in Fairfax House, parentheses.

    I'm thinking the forum has exploded today...!

    Been working on the short stories.
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    Hey all English entrants. I don't suppose you could link or post the full reading list for me?
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     The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th edition, eds Margaret Ferguson, Mary Jo Salter, and Jon Stallworthy (Norton, 2005), ISBN 9780393979206.

     The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, ed. Vincent Leitch (Norton, 2001), ISBN 9780393974294. here is a very short list of recommended essays:
    • Sidney, ‘An Apology for Poetry’. 1580
    • Shelley, ‘A Defence of Poetry’. 1821
    • Freud, ‘The Uncanny’. 1919
    • Benjamin, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’. 1936
    • Cixous, ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’. 1975.
    • Said, ‘Orientalism’. 1981
    • Eagleton, ‘The Rise of English’. 1983

     The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, ed. Joyce Carol Oates (Oxford University Press, 2004), ISBN 9780195092622.
     Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway, ed. Stella McNichol (Penguin, 2000), ISBN 9780141182490.
     William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, ed. Eugene Waith, Oxford World’s Classics, 1998. ISBN 9780199536108.

     Samuel Beckett, Complete Dramatic Works (Faber, 2006), ISBN 0571229158 /9780571229154.
     Seamus Heaney, Beowulf (Faber, 1999), ISBN 9780571230419.

    Reference Books
     The Concise Oxford Dictionary, recent edition (e.g. 11th).
     M.H. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms, 7th Edition (Thomson Learning, 2008 ISBN 9781413033939)
     John Lennard and Mary Luckhurst, The Drama Handbook (Oxford University Press, 2002), ISBN 9780198700708.
    Recommended
    John Seely’s The Oxford A-Z of Grammar and Punctuation (Oxford University Press, 2007, ISBN 9780199233465)
    Judith Woolf, Writing About Literature: Essay and Translation Skills for University Students of English and Foreign Literature (Routledge, 2005), ISBN 9780415314459.


    Good thing i had this saved on me computer
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    Ta from here as well, Bambi. I'm going to mark the essays they recommend. x3
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    This is a continuation of a discussion in the Derwent College thread.

    (Original post by Moroseblight)
    Hehe, you're making me want to read the Woolf now :p: From the little I've read of her works, I can't find fault with her writing. It's just I get lost in her long sentences, the little details distract me and I lose the main gist of things. If that made any sense. I'm sleep deprived and very hungry- so apologies if I'm spouting babble at you.

    Yea, I admit writing them in French first was a tad odd. Need to look in the reasons behind that. I've read 'Waiting for Godot'. It's hailed as an existentialist piece, hence the nothing happening and the absurdity of the whole thing are crucial aspects in it. And I find the Theatre of the Absurd interesting o_o

    Hmm. Perhaps we should take this to the Eng Lit thread? I imagine it's scaring the few Derwenters who have yet to spring out of lurkdom :p:
    Some of Woolf's sentences do have a ridiculous number of clauses in them, it's true. But I think her prose & the way that it occasionally verges on poetry is one of the things which make her such a great & memorable writer.

    He did have a reason. Something about simplifying his language or something, I think. I guess the fact that he lived in Paris probably helped, too, and a lot of his plays premiered there. I enjoy absurdist theatre. I'm particular partial to Tom Stoppard in that field, actually.
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    (Original post by archly)
    This is a continuation of a discussion in the Derwent College thread.


    Some of Woolf's sentences do have a ridiculous number of clauses in them, it's true. But I think her prose & the way that it occasionally verges on poetry is one of the things which make her such a great & memorable writer.

    He did have a reason. Something about simplifying his language or something, I think. I guess the fact that he lived in Paris probably helped, too, and a lot of his plays premiered there. I enjoy absurdist theatre. I'm particular partial to Tom Stoppard in that field, actually.
    Indeed. I started reading Mrs. Dalloway earlier and liked the way Woolf's prose was poetic at times. I suppose I must be patient and continue reading. Thanks for clearing away any reservations I had about reading the book

    Yep, you're right. He claimed that it was easier in French to write "without style". He wanted to escape from what he was familiar. I admit, I haven't read many plays from the Theatre of the Absurd. Mine is a fledgeling interest. What Tom Stoppard play would you suggest I start with?

    I have way too many books that await reading x_x
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    FRENCH LITERATURE. FRENCH IN GENERAL. :love: I can't wait for the foreign literature module, I love French so much.

    I appear to have lost my copy of Mrs Dalloway. Hmmmm, oops. Off to read Beckett for a bit now!

    edit: did anyone else really, really enjoy Beowulf? It really surprised me, before I read it I sort of assumed that I would hate it but I found it such a good read. That said I paid absolutely no attention to the scary-looking Old English on the opposite side of each page, hahaha.
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    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    FRENCH LITERATURE. FRENCH IN GENERAL. :love: I can't wait for the foreign literature module, I love French so much.

    I appear to have lost my copy of Mrs Dalloway. Hmmmm, oops. Off to read Beckett for a bit now!

    edit: did anyone else really, really enjoy Beowulf? It really surprised me, before I read it I sort of assumed that I would hate it but I found it such a good read. That said I paid absolutely no attention to the scary-looking Old English on the opposite side of each page, hahaha.
    OMG. I KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN ABOUT THE FRENCH LITERATURE! One of the things I loved about the York course when I first read about it was the fact that I'd get to do more French lit. There was none on my A Level syllabus but I did my self-study AS oral exam on Rimbaud. Symbolism is <3.

    Haven't read Beowulf yet. It's one of the few texts I haven't bought yet even though I adore the Faber imprint the version we're meant to buy is in. (Yes, I am a bibliophile, shhh.)
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    (Original post by rainbow drops)

    edit: did anyone else really, really enjoy Beowulf? It really surprised me, before I read it I sort of assumed that I would hate it but I found it such a good read. That said I paid absolutely no attention to the scary-looking Old English on the opposite side of each page, hahaha.
    I attempted to read that. Out loud. Received plenty of oddlooks and some giggles from those in the room with me at the time.

    But yes, Beowulf was a plesant and quick read :yep:
 
 
 
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