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    (Original post by Moroseblight)
    Indeed. I started reading Mrs. Dalloway earlier and liked the way Woolf's prose was poetic at times. I suppose I must be patient and continue reading. Thanks for clearing away any reservations I had about reading the book

    Yep, you're right. He claimed that it was easier in French to write "without style". He wanted to escape from what he was familiar. I admit, I haven't read many plays from the Theatre of the Absurd. Mine is a fledgeling interest. What Tom Stoppard play would you suggest I start with?

    I have way too many books that await reading x_x
    I expect you will have to be patient throughout but we'll see. I'm glad you're giving it a go instead of putting it off & dreading it.

    I'm really into plays & poetry which seems to be sort of unusual among lit students. Novels seem to be most people's preference. Stoppard-wise, his plays tend to be quite esoteric so you might want to go for one on a subject you know a little about. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead is one of his most popular plays but if you aren't very familiar with Hamlet it really won't make sense. (I saw it at 15, only vaguely knowing the plot of Hamlet and found it deeply mystifying.) Arcadia's a fairly safe bet though not as absurd. They've put it on the A Level syllabus starting this (maybe next?) year. It has two timelines and touches on subjects including maths & Byron. I've enjoy all of Stoppard's plays that I've read though so go for one that sounds good to you if you feel like giving him a go.
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    Ha, I'm a little nervous about the foreign language side of things.

    I did not get on with my German teacher at GCSE. Well, that's a lie. I liked HER plenty, but I couldn't stand how all over the place she was with her teaching methods.

    ...I don't know what language I'm going to do (can't begin to decide!) but know I want to a) go at it like a steam train with an engine heaped-high with coal (or maybe even a freight train!) and b) start from scratch all over again, since I promptly wiped all my memories of language lessons with a very corrosive mental bleach.

    I've said it before, but for the sake of discussion with newcomers: I enjoyed Beowulf because Heaney said he had grown familiar with the poetic techniques through Hopkins, and I love Hopkins so much I named my cactus after him. True fact, that. In a strange, synesthesia sort of way, the colour of the cactus flowers, "apricot ice", made me think of Hopkins.

    All those compounded neologisms. *merry sigh*

    My mental rendition of Beowulf was narrated by Oliver Postgate, though, and played out in the style of Noggin the Nog.
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    Foreign literature: ha I'm doing latin. I knew Cicero and Virgil so well in my IB exam I could have been invited for tea with them, if they were alive. Actually did ancient greek as well fwiw but that makes a me a freak of nature.....
    And beowulf is awesome but my copy only has old english on one page aww

    And I love poetry much more than novels and plays. I dunno i just find a perfectly crafted poem (love song of alfred j prucock) so satisfying
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    (Original post by Bambi2803)
    Foreign literature: ha I'm doing latin. I knew Cicero and Virgil so well in my IB exam I could have been invited for tea with them, if they were alive. Actually did ancient greek as well fwiw but that makes a me a freak of nature.....
    And beowulf is awesome but my copy only has old english on one page aww

    And I love poetry much more than novels and plays. I dunno i just find a perfectly crafted poem (love song of alfred j prucock) so satisfying
    In a minute there is time
    For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.

    Love Eliot. Prufrock was one of the first of his poems I really fell for.

    I might've tried Latin from scratch if it were an option but, sadly, 'tis not.
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    Hi there Good idea for a thread, will have to have a proper read through sometime and add in rambly thoughts about the reading list too in the next few days when I've got time hmm..

    Glad it's not just me who's playing out Beowulf in the style of Noggin the Nog haha XD

    and Bambi, I'm planning on doing Latin too (unless I switch to French at the last minute, decisions decisions).. with you on the Cicero and Virgil, Ovid too.. I reckon he'd be the most entertaining to be invited for tea with heh
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    Well, my other option is switching to English combined with Art History, but I don't reckon I really want to do that, and might cope with - even enjoy - a language, if I set my heart on it. It's that, you know, fear of the new issue.

    I'd do Latin if I could.

    I also have nooo idea what there might be to study in terms of German literature, and while the unknown is unnerving, it's also got an overpowering allure. The challenge, of course, is attractive to boot!

    ...I want to illustrate Beowulf in the style of Noggin the Nog.

    Can you tell who the chronic doodler in lectures is going to be? At least I have to excuse that doodling has been demonstrated to help you concentrate, contrary to intuition!

    I rate short stories because they seem like an elegant compromise between novels and poems. They're confined enough for any stylistic error to jar, as it would in a poem. One mistake in a short story is enough to throw it off track and ruin it, whereas the same mistake could be overlooked in a novel.
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    (Original post by Chaiteafairy)
    Well, my other option is switching to English combined with Art History, but I don't reckon I really want to do that, and might cope with - even enjoy - a language, if I set my heart on it. It's that, you know, fear of the new issue.

    I'd do Latin if I could.

    I also have nooo idea what there might be to study in terms of German literature, and while the unknown is unnerving, it's also got an overpowering allure. The challenge, of course, is attractive to boot!

    ...I want to illustrate Beowulf in the style of Noggin the Nog.

    Can you tell who the chronic doodler in lectures is going to be? At least I have to excuse that doodling has been demonstrated to help you concentrate, contrary to intuition!

    I rate short stories because they seem like an elegant compromise between novels and poems. They're confined enough for any stylistic error to jar, as it would in a poem. One mistake in a short story is enough to throw it off track and ruin it, whereas the same mistake could be overlooked in a novel.
    I think the only German module option is Goethe or, at least, that's what it said in a booklet I was given on a visit day.

    For some reason I thought I was the only person who remembered Noggin the Nog. I bet I'll have the same mental images when I come to read Beowulf now.

    I'm not sure I completely agree with your take on short stories. I guess I just find the medium to be a good introduction to authors and their themes. Another nice thing about them is they seem less tied to traditional plot structure than longer narrative works.
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    So far I've read both Beckett Plays, Beowulf, Mrs Dalloway, a selection of the poems, some short stories and the drama handbook cover to cover. I still haven't bought the Lit Crit...

    For anyone who was intrigued by Beckett's "Catastrophe" there is a dramatisation directed by David Mamet on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJreL3ozfDI
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    (Original post by Swires)
    So far I've read both Beckett Plays, Beowulf, Mrs Dalloway, a selection of the poems, some short stories and the drama handbook cover to cover. I still haven't bought the Lit Crit...

    For anyone who was intrigued by Beckett's "Catastrophe" there is a dramatisation directed by David Mamet on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJreL3ozfDI
    Ooh. I'll definitely be checking out the YT link once I've read Catastrope. That could be really handy.

    How is the drama handbook? It's one of the few I've not bought yet.
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    The Drama Handbook is both useful and obvious. It's various glossaries are useful in discussing plays but it is kind of waffly and obvious in its advice on how to read a play.

    Theres also a full dramatisation of Endgame on YT as well with Michael Gambon and David Thewlis in it.
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    Errm...quick question. What did you guys get at A2? Thinking of York for English, 2011 entrance (after a gapy year) and I'd like some assurance that your grades aren't impossible...

    In other news, you finally have a male poster. Party .
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    (Original post by The_Red_Wedge)
    Errm...quick question. What did you guys get at A2? Thinking of York for English, 2011 entrance (after a gapy year) and I'd like some assurance that your grades aren't impossible...

    In other news, you finally have a male poster. Party .
    Hi there I achieved 3 A's.

    You can find the various grade requirements for the English degrees here

    If you're after straight English Lit, you're looking at achieving AAA.
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    Ok, that's great with the introduction of the A* I've become just a little paranoid that every uni's secretly looking for 90%+ across the board.

    AAA is looking fine. English Lit, History and Politics at A2, with Geography and French at AS - good combination? I got 5 As at AS.
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    Sounds fine. you should be no problem. and there are other guys in her hem hem

    thefruitbat i ditto on ovid. anyone who writes the art of loving would be an interesting read
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    (Original post by The_Red_Wedge)
    Ok, that's great with the introduction of the A* I've become just a little paranoid that every uni's secretly looking for 90%+ across the board.

    AAA is looking fine. English Lit, History and Politics at A2, with Geography and French at AS - good combination? I got 5 As at AS.
    Ah. I forgot about the introduction of the A* next year :ninja: That paranoia is justified- English Literature is a ridiculously competitive course. I'm assuming the website will have to be updated to take the A* grade into account. York's entry requirements for English are high, so I wouldn't be surprised if they asked for A*AA (this is purely speculation based on what Cambridge has revised its standard offer too- other top uni's such as UCL seem to be following suit, but most are still working it out, it seems). I suggest emailing the Admissions admin your question as they're the only ones who are able to give you an accurate answer. I think the email was somewhere on that page I linked you.

    As for your A level choices, they're fine. I don't see your combination causing any problem ^^
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    (Original post by Swires)
    The Drama Handbook is both useful and obvious. It's various glossaries are useful in discussing plays but it is kind of waffly and obvious in its advice on how to read a play.

    Theres also a full dramatisation of Endgame on YT as well with Michael Gambon and David Thewlis in it.
    Oh right, so it's a sort of ground up guide? I realise that with plays it's easy to overlook stage directions and stuff but I've been reading plays for years without feeling a need for guidance. Oh well, I probably ought to get hold of a copy anyway.

    I'm not keen on Thewlis or Gambon but that could be interesting. I'd not thought to look for productions on YT before. This could be the beginning of a whole new hobby.
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    (Original post by archly)
    This could be the beginning of a whole new hobby.
    :yep: 'Tis wonderful though, particularly useful for productive procrastination.

    This is an older Titus Andronicus adaptation that I found on YT. It's directed by Jane Howell.

    If you're into Shakespeare, you may enjoy the stuff on here.
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    And I love poetry much more than novels and plays. I dunno i just find a perfectly crafted poem (love song of alfred j prucock) so satisfying
    That is my FAVOURITE poem. I'm the same - I'm a bit of a poetry obsessive, but that doesn't mean I don't love all kinds of literature!

    I'm about to start reading Dalloway. Has anyone bought the reference books that are 'strongly advised'? Would you advise them? Would you bother?
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    I'm not getting some of the reference books. I have access to dictionaries on my computer and as for looking up literary terms...the internet? Those extra books just seem like a waste of money to me.
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    I'm looking at the rest of the books I need on amazon and I'm not sold on all of the reference books either. Hmm.

    I'm also annoyed because I think we're meant to get the bilingual Beowulf rather than the cute F&F poetry imprint edition. I am so in love with that imprint. I have a whole little row of them on my shelf with their cute coloured Times New Roman. That's what I get for cheating on Faber with Salt Publishing, I guess.

    Have you guys read any of the 'wider reading' books? There's a separate list of them which has nothing to do with our first module.
 
 
 
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