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    (Original post by sloaner)
    I am actually an alien and my intention is to study your human ways of writing so I can propagandize your species with our superior thinking, in order to subjugate you and succeed in my ultimate goal of UNIVERSAL DOMINATION.


    But really, I hadn't considered literature until AS/A-Level when somehow I became really good at it and got mega mega marks in the exams (not boasting here) I enjoyed it but wasn't certain about studying it further. So I chose Chemistry at Edinburgh. Oops. It was awful; I hated it; bad decision. Hence I stopped going to lectures and just had fun (and got drunk and shopped:yep:) until my accommodation was up- since I had to pay until Easter at that point.

    AND SO, I reapplied and decided to go in completely the opposite direction and do English after all. After swift research and one personal statement written in 3 days to make the deadline, here I am :rolleyes:
    Where it will take me, no-one knows. But at least I'm certain this course is one I will enjoy.

    By "less enthusiasm" I merely meant to sit down and read. I would prefer to eat or drink or socialise.. but then I imagine so would a lot of people

    Go gentle on me kidz :o:
    That's really interesting. (Not the world domination bit, the bit the sounds like it might actually be true.) I definitely went through a phase of not thinking I'd do lit. I almost didn't take the A Level because I'd had such bad teaching at GCSE. But I really enjoyed AS & I love a lot of aspects of literature. (Also the fact that with lit you get to study history & philosophy & linguists & all sorts.)

    I'm totally more in the crazy intellectual who never leaves their room vein though & am not in it for the student parties. Each to each. I hope your last minute decision pays off and that you have an awesome time. I may even see you there.
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    (Original post by archly)
    I'm totally more in the crazy intellectual who never leaves their room vein though & am not in it for the student parties. Each to each. I hope your last minute decision pays off and that you have an awesome time. I may even see you there.
    Indeed, I hope it does too.

    And definitely, I'll keep a weather eye on the horizon for you :yep:
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    I just read the samuel beckett - never read waiting for godot so gave it a bash and it's class. existentialist to the highest order. Now ploughing through endgame and loving it!
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    (Original post by archly)
    That's really interesting. (Not the world domination bit, the bit the sounds like it might actually be true.) I definitely went through a phase of not thinking I'd do lit.
    Same here Three months before applying I was set on Fine Art. Like Chaiteafairy mentioned, I then realised I wanted to do something more academic first. Seeing as I'd always loved and did well in literature, that's what I went for - but I think, like what archly mentioned about being a "crazy intellectual who never leaves their room" - I'll need to be yanked out of my room too, for being a bit of an artsy hermit.
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    (Original post by fadingwinters)
    Same here Three months before applying I was set on Fine Art. Like Chaiteafairy mentioned, I then realised I wanted to do something more academic first. Seeing as I'd always loved and did well in literature, that's what I went for - but I think, like what archly mentioned about being a "crazy intellectual who never leaves their room" - I'll need to be yanked out of my room too, for being a bit of an artsy hermit.
    Yay! Hermits unite! (Or, y'know, sit quietly in their hermitages reassured by the knowlede that there are others out there like them.) I don't know what I would have chosen to study other than English Literature so I'm really glad I came around to it in the end.
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    Guys, as far as I know this only applies to single honours kids, but are you going to choose Victorian or American?

    I really don't know which to do.
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    Artsy hermitage for the win!

    I know I'm going to need people to drag me out of my room as well. I try to be sociable, I really do, but... ahaha, sometimes it's just too tempting to tuck up with a sketchbook and doodle.

    I reeeaaally hope I find time to paint. I've just signed-up to Folksy, which is a craft trading/selling site, and if I can speedily produce and sell a couple of things, I might be able to stay afloat (I'm loathing the thought of trying to get a job every summer, and want to stick as far away from shop work as possible after the end of the following three weeks. It does. my. head. in.)

    I think there's a painting society? That'd be neat. (I'm also wondering why it is all my favourite things to do are so time-demanding! Our school nurse was convinced arts students were always the most over-ambitious and frazzled).

    Anyway, whinge whinge whinge, ***** ***** *****. I've been slacking with the reading list. Again. I'm over half way through the short stories and about a third through the Beckett plays (noting trends and queerly fascinated.)

    Rainbow is part of Vanbrugh? Fairfax House, here. *high-fives!*
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    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    Guys, as far as I know this only applies to single honours kids, but are you going to choose Victorian or American?

    I really don't know which to do.
    I don't know. Do we have to pick straight away? I was going to check what the reading lists were like & the members of staff and all sorts. I did skim an old reading list at once point, they were both interesting.

    Unrelatedly, I was reading staff bios yesterday and they all seem so interesting. I wanna know who my supervisor's going to be so I can read up on them.

    (Original post by Chaiteafairy)
    Artsy hermitage for the win!

    I know I'm going to need people to drag me out of my room as well. I try to be sociable, I really do, but... ahaha, sometimes it's just too tempting to tuck up with a sketchbook and doodle.
    We should do a weekly (or fortnightly) hermit synod or something. Drink tea, discuss our artistic endeavours.

    I started reading bits of the Glossary of Literary Terms. It was weirdly engrossing. I found myself page jumping to anything that sounded interesting. I've read the bits of Beckett that we'll be studying & think I'll probably start on Mrs. Dalloway or Titus soon.
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    Yep, I'm Vanbrugh! We win at life.

    (Original post by archly)
    I don't know. Do we have to pick straight away? I was going to check what the reading lists were like & the members of staff and all sorts. I did skim an old reading list at once point, they were both interesting.

    Unrelatedly, I was reading staff bios yesterday and they all seem so interesting. I wanna know who my supervisor's going to be so I can read up on them.
    I don't know when we have to choose... That's my problem, there's aspects of both modules I really like the look of. I'd love to study the Brontes at university and if I don't take the Victorian module I don't know when the opportunity would arise again, and my parents seem to be keen on me going down the Victorian route, but whenever I've studied anything American in the past (admittedly it's not been much... I'm mainly talking about Tennessee Williams 'cause he's fantastic) I've really enjoyed it. Sooo I really don't know.

    I already know who my supervisor is. It says it on my evision page somewhere, so you should have a look and see if you can find yours. Mine's Nicola McDonald.
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    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    I don't know when we have to choose... That's my problem, there's aspects of both modules I really like the look of. I'd love to study the Brontes at university and if I don't take the Victorian module I don't know when the opportunity would arise again, and my parents seem to be keen on me going down the Victorian route, but whenever I've studied anything American in the past (admittedly it's not been much... I'm mainly talking about Tennessee Williams 'cause he's fantastic) I've really enjoyed it. Sooo I really don't know.

    I already know who my supervisor is. It says it on my evision page somewhere, so you should have a look and see if you can find yours. Mine's Nicola McDonald.
    I'm torn, too. I have read & loved a lot of American lit. I know that either way there are going to be some hefty C19th novels which may not be fun. It's a Dickens or James dichotomy on that front, I imagine. But I don't knooow. I like the idea of studying the formation of an American literature because I think we'd pretty much be doing it from the beginning & it is a context module. But, equally, some of the content of the Victorian module is pretty unmissable. OK. So going to check out reading lists now and consider further.

    & I checked evision and found it, thanks! Not sure how I feel about the person I've been assigned but I can't know until I've met her, I guess. I imagine I will be a difficult supervisee.
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    Upon closer inspection of the reading involved and further thought, I think I'm going to choose to study the Victorians in first year. To quote myself from the English applicants' 2009 thread:

    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    I think I might actually choose to do the Victorians in first year rather than American lit. Thing is, it's American literature up to 1910 that you study in the first year, and I much prefer the look of the American module that's 1910 to the present later in the course (Frank O'Hara, Hemingway, Ezra Pound... :coma:). The Victorian module might be the only opportunity I'll get during the course to study the Brontes and Wilde, as well.

    Funny, that.
    I say 'funny, that' because I've spent the whole year moaning about how much I hate some Victorian writers like Gaskell.
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    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    Upon closer inspection of the reading involved and further thought, I think I'm going to choose to study the Victorians in first year.
    I'm thinking the same, actually. I took a look at the reading lists from last year and the Victorian module seems much more consistent (at least in the texts each tutor teachers) whereas the American stuff seems a bit haphazard. I do think learning more American history would be nice though & it is a context module. Tricky.

    Also, O'Hara. <3 I'm pretty in love with the Beats & other poetic movements of that era (e.g. New York & some Confessional poetry).
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    I really don't know which to go with.

    All the American Literature I've read I've been thrilled by (and I'm gobbling the short stories, more or less), so it's got an appeal in that sense. I found Great Expectations hard work, but loved it once I got through it, and, of course, have a soft spot for the Brontes.

    Anybody else been following the hair-tearing caused by Harper Collins (or was it Random House... oh, I can't remember) publishing a Twilight-esque cover for Wuthering Heights?

    And yes! We should all meet for an art hermitage stitch-and-***** type gathering, regularly.

    I'm struggling to remember where to look for my accommodation offer (which room am I in again?) let alone check-out all the staff.

    You make me want to pick up the glossary again.

    Which of the Beckett plays do you think we'll be doing? I'm just... you know, reading slowly through each and every one of them.
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    (Original post by Chaiteafairy)
    I really don't know which to go with.

    All the American Literature I've read I've been thrilled by (and I'm gobbling the short stories, more or less), so it's got an appeal in that sense. I found Great Expectations hard work, but loved it once I got through it, and, of course, have a soft spot for the Brontes.

    Anybody else been following the hair-tearing caused by Harper Collins (or was it Random House... oh, I can't remember) publishing a Twilight-esque cover for Wuthering Heights?

    And yes! We should all meet for an art hermitage stitch-and-***** type gathering, regularly.

    I'm struggling to remember where to look for my accommodation offer (which room am I in again?) let alone check-out all the staff.

    You make me want to pick up the glossary again.

    Which of the Beckett plays do you think we'll be doing? I'm just... you know, reading slowly through each and every one of them.
    It is a tough decision. We don't start that module until term two though, right? (Or am I mistaken?)

    I read one article about the Twilightesque Wuthering Heights cover but I haven't heard anymore since. What sort of stuff's been going on?

    That could be really good. :3

    If you go to the accommodation offer pages on evision and click around a bit you'll find it.

    Beckett-wise, here's what the reading list email we were sent says:
    Samuel Beckett, Complete Dramatic Works (Faber, 2006), ISBN 0571229158 /9780571229154. Two individual works will be studied: Endgame, which plays out peculiar variations on a tragic theme, and Catastrophe, which exposes the power relations between actor and spectator with brutal precision.
    Catastrophe is very short.
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    Catastrophe is very short.
    It is also very good.
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    Regarding that twilightesque cover, I hate twilight more than words can possibly describe. they've made the dorian gray movie picture all emo-y as well. Grrrrrr.
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    Well, it's not Waterstones bestselling classic, and some fans of Twilight are (predictably, maybe) complaining it's too miserable. Personally, I'm all for more people reading it, even if only because it's "Bella and Edward's favourite book", but I think it's a shame if they miss out on some of its sophistication... which seems to be happening in a lot of cases. I read something about the Twimom's forum, followed the link, and some of them thought Linton was a positive force.

    Overlooked entirely the value Bronte seems to have placed on the functionality and wholesome rawness of the Heights, and the ornate artificiality that does nothing to improve the Grange's occupants, exposing it as hollow ('Why dost thou pine within, and suffer dearth// Painting thy outward walls so costly gay?' springs to mind). The Heights, with its pots and pans, its raw meat on display, its hunting dogs, its vegetable garden, seems more like an honest, functional heaven than the pretty, but pretty pointless, decadence of the Grange.

    But then I have to ask myself if I'm expecting too much from readers who enjoyed something as indulgent and wish-fulfilling as Twilight, that revels in materiality (the cars, the Cullen's wealth, Bella moving from whinging about being poor to having everything.) The first thing I noticed when I was giving it a go - I couldn't get beyond the first fifty pages without resorting to skimming - was that gross materialism.

    Perhaps I'm just primed to find gluttony disquieting. The feasting scene in Beloved made me feel physically ill, and I'm evidently biased against the Lintons.

    Well, what a tangent.
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    (Original post by Swires)
    It is also very good.
    It should be really interesting to study. I'm looking forward to it.

    (Original post by Bambi2803)
    Regarding that twilightesque cover, I hate twilight more than words can possibly describe. they've made the dorian gray movie picture all emo-y as well. Grrrrrr.
    I don't dig Twilight but I can see why marketing people would want to use the trend.

    I'd forgotten about the Dorian Gray movie. Last I heard they'd cast a not-blonde person. I think I just decided it was unlikely to be worth it after that.


    @Chaiteafairy (because quoting all that seems sort of excessive) I figured the Twilight fans were likely to just latch onto the 'true love' and be blind to all else.

    I've only actually seen half of the Twilight movie though and nothing else except plot summaries and random quotes. It just seemed dire. I simply couldn't understand why so many people were so in love with it.

    Wuthering Heights is surely never off topic though. Plus we are seeking solidarity in a world obsessed by Twilight. (For the record though, at the open day I went to, all but one of the people within questioning distance in the English talk said they disliked Twilight.)
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    @Archly - (I can never be faffed with quoting; too many opportunities to botch the coding!) I've never really been big on movies of books. To even begin to do a book justice, you need a TV series, and even then, they pale against the source material, usually, and particularly if they're a classic.

    I think Twilight might be the one exception, because the lighting looks interesting in the clips I've seen, and I'd watch it just for that. xD It's like, the script in Pirates of the Caribbean got progressively worse, but the special effects were so pretty and detailed the artistic part of my mind said, 'Sod it. Let's just enjoy the looks.'

    I reckon Twilight either reveals how standards of literacy have dropped (something my English teacher was always sighing over) or were lower than was thought to begin with... I also think it's just aggressively marketed (toted as the next Harry Potter, money-spinner...) has concerts and a heck load of merchandising and so forth. It's not popular because it's good; it's popular because its reputation has been inflated, maybe. It is dire.

    It's telling - and I'll have to check this, mind - that it hasn't won any serious prizes. If it has, I haven't heard anything.

    Really, it's just bamboozling.
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    @Chaiteafairy: If it's a good book then it's a good book. The film/tv series is unnecessary but I guess there are only so many great stories to tell and it's easy to make money off something you already know is popular.

    I tried to watch the Twilight movie, I really did, but it was badly paced and I didn't find the plot at all compelling. I thought that the series ought to at least be really compelling because from the extracts I've read it's so badly written that nothing much else could redeem it. I wasn't that sold on the filmography when I watched the film & it felt a little surreal to be watching this massively hyped thing and just think it was dull.

    The thing I've noticed about standards of literacy/book sales & reading habits of kids is basically just that there's so much more to do these days that reading isn't as high on most people's agendas. I think the internet in particular has affected reading habits and attitudes. I guess people feel that there's no reason to read a book when you can access so much digital media and so much of it is free. They don't seem to get that your brain and your imagination can create just as rich and interactive landscape as technology, poor things. And, when it comes to choice of books, I think part of the joy of reading something like Twilight or HP is that you can discuss it with people (online & off) and that there is much more to it than the books, you get a whole multimedia experience including merchandise extras like the new Wuthering Heights edition, fan pages, official webpages, viral marketing etc.

    Ridiculous & rambling post is ridiculous & rambing, soory.
 
 
 
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