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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    I don't know about that. You're sort of trying to prove the obvious.
    Well, no, actually, because the standard claim is that a first from a sub-50 university is comparable with one from a top-5 university.

    Didn't you do algebraic topology?
    Different approach and I didn't take it seriously anyhow. (Wasn't going to do it in the exam).

    P.S. Okay, comparing top unis could work. However, most of the courses will be different I guess you could compare lets say topology exams?
    Yes, courses will be different. Which makes comparisons difficult unless you know all the material in both courses. Another reason why it's better to look for big differences rather than small ones.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    You get to do complex analysis in the first year at Bristol.


    P.S. Has anyone noticed that some unis have a biased towards pure or applied or mathematical physics? it seems that warwick has a very strong bias away from mathematical physics. Although, that could be the impression from some comments made by Totally Tom about mathematical physics students.
    I don't think so, because I really can't see it anywhere in their first year units (they have Analysis 1 and Further Topics in Analysis, which together cover a good amount of Real Analysis, but don't really go too far into Integration...) I think I've found something similar looking at the end of their 2nd year Calculus course, though.
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    (Original post by DFranklin)
    Well, no, actually, because the standard claim is that a first from a sub-50 university is comparable with one from a top-5 university.
    I agree with the standard claim.

    (Original post by DFranklin)
    Yes, courses will be different. Which makes comparisons difficult unless you know all the material in both courses. Another reason why it's better to look for big differences rather than small ones.
    Okay, but I don't know about sub-50. I wonder what QMUL will be like compared to say Imperial. But, then QMUL has high grades to get in.

    P.S. Most sub-50 unis won't have say maths as a straight course but more like maths and statistics or maths and something else. Well, thats my impression from looking at unis on ucas extra.
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    But, it isn't.
    Hypothesis testing: H_0 is always the hypothesis of no change; in this case, that the two degrees are comparable.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    You get to do complex analysis in the first year at Bristol.
    No, you don't (or at least I didn't). We don't do complex function theory "properly" until 3rd year, although there is some fairly basic complex calculus in the first two years.

    (Original post by henryt)
    Mm, have just looked through the 2nd year Bristol material - the questions don't, in general, seem to be too involved, and a lot of the material was stuff that we covered during the first year, though, the Analysis is completely different - all to do with connectedness and compactness, very little to do with the Complex Analysis course we studied (which basically featured the life works of Cauchy, along with some basic Topology). That said, I could probably have a good shot at the questions with my limited knowledge!
    The analysis 2 course is basically metric spaces. To be honest, I agree that a lot of 2nd year stuff was straightforward. Much of the "harder" material is probably in the applied courses, which I shied away from (and subsequently didn't bother getting the past papers for).
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    (Original post by majikthise)
    Much of the "harder" material is probably in the applied courses, which I shied away from (and subsequently didn't bother getting the past papers for).
    Yeah - I was just looking at the Stats, and it's definitely comparable in material with Ox or Cam. I'm just glad that our First year course on 3D-calc (which was compulsory - similar looking to the first half of your Calc 2) didn't count towards Finals...!
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    (Original post by henryt)
    Yeah - I was just looking at the Stats, and it's definitely comparable in material with Ox or Cam. I'm just glad that our First year course on 3D-calc (which was compulsory - similar looking to the first half of your Calc 2) didn't count towards Finals...!
    What, your first year didn't count?

    Sorry, I need to find out how much the first year is worth because whats the point of studying hard and its like worth 10% or less than that.

    P.S. Why do some unis have set theory in third year and some in fourth year? If the uni has set theory in the fourth year does it mean its a year behind the other uni? :o:

    Its just weird to see a uni doing galois theory in the last year and other doing it in the third year.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    What, your first year didn't count?

    Sorry, I need to find out how much the first year is worth because whats the point of studying hard and its like worth 10% or less than that.

    P.S. Why do some unis have set theory in third year and some in fourth year? If the uni has set theory in the fourth year does it mean its a year behind the other uni? :o:

    Its just weird to see a uni doing galois theory in the last year and other doing it in the third year.
    The First Public Examinations (called Preliminary Examinations, Moderations or Honours Moderations) at Oxford do not count towards your Final degree. So my First year, which consisted of a broad course of plenty of different stuff, didn't count towards my degree. It's weighted 40% for my 2nd year, and 60% for my 3rd, with the seperate MMath classification being based on the 4th year alone. To answer your question, 'What's the point?' - if you get a First, you're likely to be rewarded with a Scholarship, which gets you a nice gown, some book tokens and some money off your bills. I just took it as an opportunity to have fun! Obviously, it will vary from university to university.

    And this point, about having certain courses a year later is exactly why it's hard to say that a certain degree is definitely equal or comparable to another. If I'm doing material a year ahead, but getting just OK grades, is that better or the same or worse than someone doing the same material a year later (and so also likely missing out on other material) but perhaps doing better, because they've had time to mature Mathematically?
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/s...MIATH20122.pdf

    Is it harder than manchester second year Metric spaces exam?
    Definitely.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    Have you got the warwick exam paper online?


    http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/s.../MATH41051.pdf

    This is a third year paper. How does this compared to Imperials Metric and Topological spaces exam?
    This is similar to Warwick's third year equivalent. Although this years Warwick paper got scaled down as it was quite easy. Last years was a lot harder.
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    (Original post by henryt)
    The First Public Examinations (called Preliminary Examinations, Moderations or Honours Moderations) at Oxford do not count towards your Final degree. So my First year, which consisted of a broad course of plenty of different stuff, didn't count towards my degree. It's weighted 40% for my 2nd year, and 60% for my 3rd, with the seperate MMath classification being based on the 4th year alone. To answer your question, 'What's the point?' - if you get a First, you're likely to be rewarded with a Scholarship, which gets you a nice gown, some book tokens and some money off your bills. I just took it as an opportunity to have fun!
    Scholarship? I did read somewhere about top ten students in the whole uni get £10,000. However, the first year seems sort of pointless. Espically, if its just having fun:o:

    (Original post by henryt)
    And this point, about having certain courses a year later is exactly why it's hard to say that a certain degree is definitely equal or comparable to another. If I'm doing material a year ahead, but getting just OK grades, is that better or the same or worse than someone doing the same material a year later (and so also likely missing out on other material) but perhaps doing better, because they've had time to mature Mathematically?
    I don't know but its sort of pointless doing some stuff in the third year that don't lead to anything. As if you look at set theory for example most don't lead to anything in fourth year. Nor does galois theory.

    That reminds me of the Algebra 2 debate in the warwick maths forum, a lot of people said that some of the material should really be done later as students aren't mature enough for it.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    Sorry, I need to find out how much the first year is worth because whats the point of studying hard and its like worth 10% or less than that.
    Because if you don't understand the material in the first year, chances are you're going to do really badly in the 2nd year.

    If the uni has set theory in the fourth year does it mean its a year behind the other uni? :o:
    No. You can't judge from one course. (And you also have to judge by more than the name of the course).

    Realistically, there's not a lot of point commenting in this discussion unless you have already completed a good amount of university level maths. (Even if you have a full maths degree it's not easy to make sensible comments, I am finding!)
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    The scholarships aren't that much! Just a couple of hundred quid a year! More of a token gesture, than anything else.

    And those subjects aren't really pointless in that they do not lead anywhere! I'm just flicking through the 4th Year Course Handbook which lists the courses and their pre-requisities, and the Logic and Set Theory courses lead directly to a course on 'Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems and Model Theory', and 'Analytic Topology and Axiomatic Set Theory'... And people obviously do research in these sorts of things too!
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    It would probably also be worth considering grade boundaries for exams on average.

    The 3rd year Oxford Analysis exam looks a bit harder than the Linear Analysis stuff (of the 2008 year), but 2006 Cambridge seems harder...it's hard to say though without fully attacking the questions.

    I prefer when each exam is only on one lecture course, compared to the Cambridge "You need to know EVERYTHING for this exam" method employed in 2nd and 3rd year
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    (Original post by KAISER_MOLE)
    I prefer when each exam is only on one lecture course, compared to the Cambridge "You need to know EVERYTHING for this exam" method employed in 2nd and 3rd year
    Yeah, Bristolians (and possibly most others?) get it easy in this respect- first semester subjects are examined one paper each at the end of Easter, with the second semester subjects examined in June. Hence if you're a lazy twit (like me) you can completely forget half of the year's material before starting to revise the other half!
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    mr Alexander aka IrrationalNumber has got some Manchester met papers he was doing a while back (3rd year ones) which he could do...

    As for the Mathematical Physics stuff that Mr Simpy was on about, all of the physics type stuff done by the maths department is taken from a very mathematical point of view (obvs) but if you want a more physicy type courses etc you can easily take physics courses done by the physics department (who have no good lecturers are are general tosswanks).
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    Here's a topology paper from third year and a linear analysis paper that could be done in either third or fourth, but more likely fourth. It's actually linear analysis 1 so there is another one.08MATH5015M01s1.pdf

    07MATH322401s1.pdf

    Leeds university.
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    (Original post by DFranklin)
    l
    A couple of papers above. If you have a specific topic then i'll look. I don't think it should be a problem for the purpose of this thread.
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    (Original post by majikthise)
    No, you don't (or at least I didn't). We don't do complex function theory "properly" until 3rd year, although there is some fairly basic complex calculus in the first two years.
    Me neither. The structure then was a hand having introduction to complex analysis as part of Calculus 2 in the second year, then a proper treatment of complex analysis and harmonic functions (the latter usually being question 6 on the paper, and the question no-one ever bothered to revise for) in the third year with Complex Function Theory.
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    (Original post by George231086)
    A couple of papers above. If you have a specific topic then i'll look. I don't think it should be a problem for the purpose of this thread.
    Galois Theory / Number Theory if it's no trouble (they're the 3rd/4th year courses where I seem to most generally still know how to do the questions, or at least vaguely understand them!).

    Interesting (to me) that Measure Theory comes under the title Analysis for a couple of these universities - it was a separate course at Cambridge. (Sadly a course I never really got to grips with - one of the bigger holes in my mathematical education).
 
 
 
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