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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    I found that hallmates are much closer than coursemates. Probably because in the first few weeks people make much more of an effort to know the people they're living with than studying with. Plus in the first year a lot of socialising is done within halls, sorting out nights out with friends in other halls ends up being more hassle and taking more time so it doesn't happen as much.

    Like I said, I had some really good friends from my course, but halls friends/housemates always came first. Usually if I was going on a night out with coursemates in first year it'd be because we were all going to the same place with our mates anyway. In 2nd and 3rd year there was more coursemate socialising because everyone's social circle has become a lot smaller after leaving halls, and studying timetables are obviously going to correlate more with coursemates than housemates, but the habits from first year are still there.

    It's a pros and cons situation really. There are times when it's more convenient to go out with housemates (when you want to go out with minimum fuss and waiting around), times when it's more convenient with coursemates (after handing in coursework, end of exams). It's not the end of the world if you miss out on one of those, but it obviously limits your options. But then again, it may be a case of not knowing what you haven't got.

    If you have enough friends at home and don't want many more, then I wouldn't argue against commuting. But if your friends are moving away for uni and you're expecting to make loads of new friends, I'd recommend halls. Also depends how far from the uni you live. If it's easy to get a taxi home after a night out then that's going to be a lot more liveable than having to sleep on friend's floors a few times a week.

    EDIT: Sorry for the essay, thought it best to give an overall answer so you could make a better choice. :o:
    I appreciate the input, honestly.. so thanks ..One more thing.. do people who commute generally hang out with others in halls after lectures, evenings? (obviously within reason and not there the whole time like a bad stain)

    ps; I live near enough to potentially bike it everyday
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    (Original post by Preeka)
    I appreciate the input, honestly.. so thanks ..One more thing.. do people who commute generally hang out with others in halls after lectures, evenings? (obviously within reason and not there the whole time like a bad stain)

    ps; I live near enough to potentially bike it everyday
    It depends on the time of year and the course. Sometimes people go for coffee/lunch/a drink after lectures, sometimes people go straight home. I studied biology though, so me and my coursemates spent most the time on campus and socialised/studied in the breaks between lectures. By the time it came to the end of the day we all wanted to get home, especially for the winter months when it's already dark by then.

    My lab partner was probably the person I spoke to most because of the uni hours, but it was a weird friendship since we were forced to be together so much at uni that it kinda felt overboard to hang out outside of those hours as well. When you're with someone for lab work 12-16 hours a week you pretty much exhaust all conversation.

    Not sure how it is for a course like History that has only 6-8 hour uni hours a week.

    If you're within cycling distance, then commuting is no bad thing. You can probably have the same lifestyle (as long as your parents are leanient), just miss out a tiny bit on meeting as many people as you would at halls. Join a few societies if you want to top up the social life to hall-going levels, but that's no hardship (I recommend student radio, it's great fun and pretty good for meeting people!). There might be a freshers society set up for people in private accommodation too.
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    My friend's boyfriend commuted and he found it fine. You just have to make more of an effort, I think.
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    (Original post by Preeka)
    I always sort of thought 'coursemates' would be quite close i.e. there's loads of similarities in terms of intelligence ('cause you would have got similar grades to get onto that course), similar ambitions, and the added similarity of the academics and constantly seeing each other every lecture... does that not bring people as close as otherwise?

    from experience, just because in theory you would have similar interests being on the same course etc it really is just pot luck as to whether you get on well with your course mates or not, if they all make the effort then you should make some great friends.

    unfortunately my course mates did not really make that much of an effort and even living in halls i felt like i missed out so it really is just down to how much effort you all put in.
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    (Original post by Preeka)
    I could hug you!
    Don't worry at all.
    I sometimes think maybe I got lucky but as long as you're a friendly/social person you should be fine!
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    yeah, you really do. though many people meet in class, the hanging out, and..... all the other fun stuff occurs in the dorms. that's where all the friendships and relationships are built. not to say you can't have an awesome uni experience if you commute, it's just starting off at a bit of a disadvantage.
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    It definitely would be a smoother start for getting to know people if you lived in halls. However, it's not guaranteed you'll make friends with the people you'd be living with. I know quite a few people that didn't get on with their halls/flatmates. These people (including me) made their friends in societies and sports clubs, and on their course.

    I think that especially sports clubs are a good way of making friends. The clubs tend to be tight knit groups of people that usually end up hanging out with each other a lot and making friends with each other. Especially because you spend a lot of time with each other during training and then there's also a lot of social happenings etc.
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    The friends you make in your first few weeks/months of Uni don't always tend to become the "lifelong close" friendships everyone seems disillusioned with.

    Year One is so temporary. Yes living in halls makes a good start and means making friends is easier but it doesn't mean the friends you makes are better than those you'd make if you lived at home and commuted in, so long as you don't go in to Uni then leave as soon as the last lecture has finished - make the most of your day at uni.

    The big advantage you'll have is the secure environment of studying, and people aren't going to come knocking on your door whilst you're in the middle of an important essay, inviting you on a night out, or asking for a "quick drink" which quickly becomes several and results in that essay being left till the last minute and being substandard....but I suppose you could say that's what University is all about.
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    It depends on the time of year and the course. Sometimes people go for coffee/lunch/a drink after lectures, sometimes people go straight home. I studied biology though, so me and my coursemates spent most the time on campus and socialised/studied in the breaks between lectures. By the time it came to the end of the day we all wanted to get home, especially for the winter months when it's already dark by then.

    My lab partner was probably the person I spoke to most because of the uni hours, but it was a weird friendship since we were forced to be together so much at uni that it kinda felt overboard to hang out outside of those hours as well. When you're with someone for lab work 12-16 hours a week you pretty much exhaust all conversation.

    Not sure how it is for a course like History that has only 6-8 hour uni hours a week.

    If you're within cycling distance, then commuting is no bad thing. You can probably have the same lifestyle (as long as your parents are leanient), just miss out a tiny bit on meeting as many people as you would at halls. Join a few societies if you want to top up the social life to hall-going levels, but that's no hardship (I recommend student radio, it's great fun and pretty good for meeting people!). There might be a freshers society set up for people in private accommodation too.
    Hiya, i'm starting a biology degree in September. Just wondered if you could give me a sort of insight into a normal week eg how many hours lectures, labs etc. You can private message me if you dont mind.

    I'm a bit worried because i cant live in halls. I have 2 young children so will live at home and the problem is that i wouldnt really be able to hang round after uni to socialise as i obviously need to get straight home. If i had days where i finished at say 3 then i could stay for an hour or two tho.

    I'll also be more than willing to go on arranged nights out but do people actually arrange things or do people at halls just go out spur of the moment?

    Getting very worried about making friends after reading this thread.
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    (Original post by seyoung1)
    Hiya, i'm starting a biology degree in September. Just wondered if you could give me a sort of insight into a normal week eg how many hours lectures, labs etc. You can private message me if you dont mind.

    I'm a bit worried because i cant live in halls. I have 2 young children so will live at home and the problem is that i wouldnt really be able to hang round after uni to socialise as i obviously need to get straight home. If i had days where i finished at say 3 then i could stay for an hour or two tho.

    I'll also be more than willing to go on arranged nights out but do people actually arrange things or do people at halls just go out spur of the moment?

    Getting very worried about making friends after reading this thread.
    Don't worry at all! When people have been talking about missing out in this thread they generally mean the 24/7 crazy student lifestyle, not being in halls won't make you a social leper in the slightest.

    The average day in first year I was probably in for 4-6 hours a day, maybe a few hours more on practical days. It's a bit hazy now (4 years ago), but there were usually 2-5 lectures a day (think I had about 18 lectures a week). It may sound a lot compared to some other degrees, but the content of each lecture was pretty sparse, so not too much studying to do.

    Practicals were arranged at 2-5pm two days a week, although sometimes they were a bit shorter, sometimes a bit longer, depending on the experiment. Obviously the exact way practicals and lectures work out varies uni to uni, but I guess the hours and general pace are pretty similar.

    One of my coursemates had a child. Her timetable was quite hectic (sometimes she would prefer to study during breaks since she had less time to do it at home), but she came socialising whenever she could and seemed pretty content with how everything went. We would arrange nights out occassionally as a tutor group, I think the key is to be decisive and get it arranged. A lot of the time students won't think about planning anything because they don't feel the need to, but with your situation people will realise you can't go out on a whim. Be a bit vocal about organising things if nothing is said, a lot of the time all it takes is for someone to say "does everyone want to go out next friday?" for it to be sorted out.
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    Don't worry at all! When people have been talking about missing out in this thread they generally mean the 24/7 crazy student lifestyle, not being in halls won't make you a social leper in the slightest.

    The average day in first year I was probably in for 4-6 hours a day, maybe a few hours more on practical days. It's a bit hazy now (4 years ago), but there were usually 2-5 lectures a day (think I had about 18 lectures a week). It may sound a lot compared to some other degrees, but the content of each lecture was pretty sparse, so not too much studying to do.

    Practicals were arranged at 2-5pm two days a week, although sometimes they were a bit shorter, sometimes a bit longer, depending on the experiment. Obviously the exact way practicals and lectures work out varies uni to uni, but I guess the hours and general pace are pretty similar.

    One of my coursemates had a child. Her timetable was quite hectic (sometimes she would prefer to study during breaks since she had less time to do it at home), but she came socialising whenever she could and seemed pretty content with how everything went. We would arrange nights out occassionally as a tutor group, I think the key is to be decisive and get it arranged. A lot of the time students won't think about planning anything because they don't feel the need to, but with your situation people will realise you can't go out on a whim. Be a bit vocal about organising things if nothing is said, a lot of the time all it takes is for someone to say "does everyone want to go out next friday?" for it to be sorted out.
    Thank you! Thats brilliant advice and information and you've really put my mind to rest.

    I really appreciate you replying.

    Sarah
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    its a rite of passage to move out at 18 and experience the big bad world. If there is no financial reason why you can't, and your parents are supportive then I think you should do it. It may well be the experience of a lifetime.
 
 
 
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