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It would appear I have mild depression. Watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Long story short: For the last 3 years I have been feeling low. This can't be attributed to any one thing, but instead a series of minor events. I thought Uni might help but it just made me feel worse. I don't ever feel happy, just less sad. I put this down to the usual teenage melodrama, but it occured to me that 3 years was a long time to feel sad, so I looked up depression.

    The symptons are:

    * continuous low mood or sadness,
    * feelings of hopelessness and helplessness,
    * low self-esteem,
    * tearfulness,
    * feelings of guilt,
    * feeling irritable and intolerant of others,
    * lack of motivation and little interest in things,
    * difficulty making decisions,
    * lack of enjoyment,
    * suicidal thoughts or thoughts of harming someone else,
    * feeling anxious or worried.

    I have all of these, and not just a little bit, they are the predominant traits in my life. My friends have no idea about this, I have gotten extremely good at putting on an illusion of happiness, but it is simply that, an illusion.

    So, there we have it. It seems fairly conclusive I have some form of mild depression.

    My questions to the TSR community at large are these:

    1) What do I do now?
    2) Has anyone else has this, are you better now?
    3) Are there any more extreme tests I can take to confirm I'm not just being over dramatic?
    • #2
    #2

    1) You can go to your gp if you feel you want help
    2)yes many -some people's problems will never go away but if they want to get better they can its down to you
    3)gp.
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    You ideally need to go to the GP who will be able to diagnose you and help you to decide what to do next. Not many internet tests can give you a true answer. He will be able to help you to rather than trying to cope yourself (:
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    1) You can go to your gp if you feel you want help
    2)yes many -some people's problems will never go away but if they want to get better they can its down to you
    3)gp.
    Have you been through this yourself? What sort of tests do they do? I'm just a little scared.
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    Your GP is the best bet, they will not judge you and are there to help and listen, i would be hesitant to trust some online resources as to the diagnosis of mental health as i think even thought some are developed by profesionals alot are not.

    Talk to your GP honestly they will help, if you need further help they can provide it and will.

    Its natural to be scared but when you get over the intital apprehension it is fine, and in the long run it will do you alot of good.
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    They don't do "tests" as such they ask you to fill in a form....it's a sort of checklist and you check how many times/how often you've felt certain things and then from that they get a good idea about what you need. GP's aren't psychologists so they won't be intrusive they just do a minimal assessment and refer you to a psychologist if necessary - or a counsellor.

    If you're at uni there should be a student counselling service you can attend (even at most schools/colleges actually) which is worth a shot.

    Don't be ashamed to seek help for mental health issues - they are primarily biological problems caused by fluctuations in brain chemistry - no different than a sprained arm or a broken leg and they can be resolved.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Have you been through this yourself? What sort of tests do they do? I'm just a little scared.
    When I went the GP got me to fill out a multiple choice form on his computer where I had to rank how often/unoften I felt each of the things listed, it was pretty easy just be honest and see what the gp says.

    There's a depression society on tsr if you ever feel the need to talk to other people with depression.
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    There are actually more symptomatically mild but longer-lived forms of depression (I just can't remember the name off the top of my head - dysthymia? That could be it, or something similar.) It's possible. I side with the people saying see your GP.

    When I went to MY GP - actually, she wasn't my GP; I didn't want to speak with a man - she just asked me a handful of questions, explained a little about her initial impressions, prescribed me prozac (which she said I didn't have to take if I had objections) and must evidently have considered my case serious enough (though I didn't realise this at the time) to race me into therapy. If anything, the drugs took the edge off enough for me to talk about my thoughts without wasting my therapist's time by dissolving into a wibbly, blubbering heap.

    *smallhug* There isn't anything to be afraid of in seeking help for these things. I think it's one in three people will experience (or, at least will have a close relative or friend that experiences) depression at some point in their lives. It's just society has a silly stigma about it.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    But it's going to take about 3 weeks to get an appointment with my GP. It's odd, if I do have it then I've been living with it for 3 years just fine, but now that I am aware I might have it 3 weeks seems an impossibly long time to wait.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    But it's going to take about 3 weeks to get an appointment with my GP. It's odd, if I do have it then I've been living with it for 3 years just fine, but now that I am aware I might have it 3 weeks seems an impossibly long time to wait.
    You could just see any doctor, it needn't be your actual registered GP...
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    2) Has anyone else has this, are you better now?
    You dont really get 'better' totally. You just get better at dealing with it, and sometimes these feelings are triggered by certain events and situations in your life, if indeed you have a form of bipolar depression.

    I know that sounds really sucky, but its not that bad. It'll just be in the back of your mind from time to time, but I think it has made me a better person

    :console:
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    I have the same sort of thing. I've been notably feeling like you have for at least three years, possibly longer but I just thought it was normal until literally last week one of my friends suggested I might have depression. She had depression and severe paranoia (to the extent that she wouldn't leave her room for 6 months, dropped out of school because of it and had to have serious therapy) so maybe I'll get something done about it at last. It'd be nice to get my happiness emotion back again
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    My advice, crack a beer, or a glass of scotch and put some music on.

    Tonight I've gone with a glass of Glenfiddich and the Handel Organ concerto


    The only person going to cheer yourself up tonight is you.
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Have you been through this yourself? What sort of tests do they do? I'm just a little scared.

    I havent actually gotten any treatment but I was offered a form of counselling I didnt pursue. and i didnt get any tests either I just explained my situation and was asked a few questions basically.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Long story short: For the last 3 years I have been feeling low. This can't be attributed to any one thing, but instead a series of minor events. I thought Uni might help but it just made me feel worse. I don't ever feel happy, just less sad. I put this down to the usual teenage melodrama, but it occured to me that 3 years was a long time to feel sad, so I looked up depression.

    The symptons are:

    * continuous low mood or sadness,
    * feelings of hopelessness and helplessness,
    * low self-esteem,
    * tearfulness,
    * feelings of guilt,
    * feeling irritable and intolerant of others,
    * lack of motivation and little interest in things,
    * difficulty making decisions,
    * lack of enjoyment,
    * suicidal thoughts or thoughts of harming someone else,
    * feeling anxious or worried.

    I have all of these, and not just a little bit, they are the predominant traits in my life. My friends have no idea about this, I have gotten extremely good at putting on an illusion of happiness, but it is simply that, an illusion.

    So, there we have it. It seems fairly conclusive I have some form of mild depression.

    My questions to the TSR community at large are these:

    1) What do I do now?
    2) Has anyone else has this, are you better now?
    3) Are there any more extreme tests I can take to confirm I'm not just being over dramatic?
    I can't really diagnose you, but I maybe can give you a bit of advice. I have had depression for about 6 years, from when I was 12 to about 18. Like you, I just thought it was general teenager moodiness, but I finally realised it wasn't normal a few years ago. I've been to the doctor's, been to counselling and taken anti-depressants, and I've gotten a lot better. In fact, I doubt I have depression any more, just anxiety.

    All those symptoms you have described is what I've been through, so I understand how you are feeling now. The worst part is feeling lethargic all the time. I've learned to accept that depression is a separate part of me, it's not my fault if I feel down, it's depression. Eventually I convinced myself that everything I used to enjoy doing has been tainted by depression, and I just needed to break away from those negative feelings to enjoy what I used to enjoy before. But depression isn't you, it shouldn't control you, you have other things in your life than misery, so you need to push that to the back of your mind.

    You may feel that depression is the main part of you, and it starts to stifle the real you. The bigger part is depression, it tells you how to feel and what to do, the other part is the 'real' you - all your thoughts and dreams and interests. The depression jars everything you enjoy and twists it all into something negative - friendships, your hobbies, everything is twisted to you. I know it's hard to discern what is really "you" and not just depression, because depression has been a big part of your life for 3 years it's like you've almost gotten used to it. I'm not sure how you view depression, but to some people it's almost like a comfort, and you almost feel "safe" being low all the time, because you're scared to be happy.

    You can look at depression and anxiety at something that isn't a part of you, it's stopping your body from feeling happiness or seeing anything in a positive light, and you need to take yourself away from this. If you really try to break out of your sadness, you can get over it by yourself. I know it's easier said than done, but it's all about negating negative thoughts, and accepting you can feel happier. A good way of thinking about it is to work out whether you're feeling down because of your thoughts, or physical problems. If it's a physical problem, you can usually sort it out (like an overdue essay or whatever), but an internal problem is usually something pointless you're worrying about, that cannot seem to be solved, because it's a problem purely in your mind.

    I apologise if some of what I said doesn't apply to you, I'm just describing quite an extreme case.

    Good luck, feel free to PM me if you need to.
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    OP, it really depends how bad a case you are/whether it's anything underneath the depression. As a starting point, unipolar depression or major depressive disorder, can spontaneously lift of its own accord (and can be helped by exercise and walking and forcing yourself to do more). If there is something like anxiety egging on the depression (and often the criteria for depression and anxiety disorders overlap, I've been told), then... it might be more persistent. Or if it's one of the chronic, longer-enduring forms. It'd be wrong to say, "Yes, you'll be completely fine and happy!" but things can get brighter.

    If you can't wait to speak to your GP, just phone your nearest surgery and request the first appointment you can get.
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    1) see your GP, self diagnosis is a really bad thing to try and do.

    2) i've had depression for over 10 years (I'm 22). It may have been mild at one point but for the most part is moderate to sever and i have a diagnosis of recurrant depressive illness (and boderline personality disorder). I'm on anti-depressents and am on a waiting list for CBT. I dont see me being better anytime soon, but i hope i will be one day.

    3)there aren't really any conclusive tests and as i said before self diagnosis is a bad idea, let your GP be the one to diagnse you.However the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hosptial Anxiety and Depression scale are two screening tests GPs do use
 
 
 
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