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    If you work in retail or know someone who does what are the background secrets of its success or just the industry's dirty deeds.
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    Eh? What do you mean its background secrets?

    I work at John Lewis if you have any questions:erm:
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    I used to work at Debenhams so I'm ready to reveal all their dirty secrets.

    There aren't really any.

    The only thing that shocked me was once a month they take the FDG (faulty, damaged, goodwill) box full of perfectly repairable, expensive clothes down to the loading bay, cover them in nail varnish and rip them up then put them in a bin. I've seen £150 dresses destroyed for having some threading gone wrong or a perfectly good pair of jeans wrecked for having 2 buttons missing.
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    (Original post by Norfolkadam)
    I used to work at Debenhams so I'm ready to reveal all their dirty secrets.

    There aren't really any.

    The only thing that shocked me was once a month they take the FDG (faulty, damaged, goodwill) box full of perfectly repairable, expensive clothes down to the loading bay, cover them in nail varnish and rip them up then put them in a bin. I've seen £150 dresses destroyed for having some threading gone wrong or a perfectly good pair of jeans wrecked for having 2 buttons missing.
    At John Lewis we just reduce the price of that kind of stuff

    It does remind me of how M&S used to destroy all the clothes that were tried on but not bought. I don't think they do that anymore but I could be wrong.
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    (Original post by Norfolkadam)
    I used to work at Debenhams so I'm ready to reveal all their dirty secrets.

    There aren't really any.

    The only thing that shocked me was once a month they take the FDG (faulty, damaged, goodwill) box full of perfectly repairable, expensive clothes down to the loading bay, cover them in nail varnish and rip them up then put them in a bin. I've seen £150 dresses destroyed for having some threading gone wrong or a perfectly good pair of jeans wrecked for having 2 buttons missing.
    Why do that? :eek:
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    Why do that? :eek:
    So no one could rake the bins and use/repair them I'd think. If not then definetly a bit strange !
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    Why do that? :eek:
    To discourage tramps and the like from hunting around in the bins.


    (Original post by paddy)
    At John Lewis we just reduce the price of that kind of stuff

    It does remind me of how M&S used to destroy all the clothes that were tried on but not bought. I don't think they do that anymore but I could be wrong.
    Ah yeah we have the reduction tags so it goes onto the sale rail then down 20% then next week to 40% all the way down to 80% off. The stuff that gets destroyed is either unresalable for whatever reason, returned, faulty lingerie, cosmetics or stuff with large fabric damages so more than 1 button missing, big rips but still perfectly repairable.
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    Oh the fascinating secrets of retail.

    Actually I do have things I could tell you which you'd probably like to hear but I shan't post them for fear of losing my job :no:
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    Used to work at BHS and we shared a loading bay with Greggs....

    They just bin anything left at the end of the day, in bin bags with security tags on

    To make it worse, there's a homeless shelter just down the road that's always struggling for food and donations.... I'm sure they'd love them, its not like they go off by that night! :rolleyes:
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    Don't know if it's really a secret anymore (it's common sense really) but supermarkets stock their shelves with the newer stuff at the back of the shelf. Hence, if you root around you should find stuff with a longer date on (if the stockists are doing their jobs properly).
    Having worked in a supermarket on and off for over a year, I never take things from the front of the shelf when food shopping.
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    (Original post by neillya1)
    Used to work at BHS and we shared a loading bay with Greggs....

    They just bin anything left at the end of the day, in bing bags with security tags on

    To make it worse, there's a homeless shelter just down the road that's always struggling for food and donations.... I'm sure they'd love them, its not like they go off by that night! :rolleyes:
    Gosh that sounds cold and heartless
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    Don't know if it's really a secret anymore (it's common sense really) but supermarkets stock their shelves with the newer stuff at the back of the shelf. Hence, if you root around you should find stuff with a longer date on (if the stockists are doing their jobs properly).
    Having worked in a supermarket on and off for over a year, I never take things from the front of the shelf when food shopping.
    That why I alway seem to get the milk from the back everytime am sent out to buy it.
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    (Original post by geeksandtherest)
    Gosh that sounds cold and heartless
    yeh but it would destroy the price mechanism, economics and therefore the world if they gave them away, the homeless people or the world-that is the choice.
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    (Original post by Yekim_8)
    So no one could rake the bins and use/repair them I'd think. If not then definetly a bit strange !
    Ah yes, those people that go through bins as a lifestyle could salvage them. Or other people colud just pick them up and re-sell them.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    Don't know if it's really a secret anymore (it's common sense really) but supermarkets stock their shelves with the newer stuff at the back of the shelf. Hence, if you root around you should find stuff with a longer date on (if the stockists are doing their jobs properly).
    Having worked in a supermarket on and off for over a year, I never take things from the front of the shelf when food shopping.
    it's called date rotation, everyone knows that!
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    (Original post by pamelaa)
    it's called date rotation, everyone knows that!
    You'd think it would be common knowledge but you'd be surprised how many people are completely oblivious to it.
    How many people do you see taking stuff from the back of the shelves, which you'd assume they would do if they knew there was newer stuff there...? Not many.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    You'd think it would be common knowledge but you'd be surprised how many people are completely oblivious to it.
    How many people do you see taking stuff from the back of the shelves, which you'd assume they would do if they knew there was newer stuff there...? Not many.
    My nan told me about it so I always do with things like milk and bread. Plus if you want a drink the stuff at the back of the cabinet is normally colder than the stuff at the front.
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    I have a few friends that did summer work in 'Ici Paris' - I doubt you have those in the UK, but they're really popular beauty stores (make-up, perfume, skin products etc.) in Belgium and the Netherlands.
    The people who work there have to 'advice' costumers what to buy, but they're not really honest. They all have to reach a weekly 'target'; sell five Chanel products, five by Dior etc. So when they give people advice to buy X over Y, it's just to reach their target, not because it's really what that person is looking for.
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    (Original post by _Claudia_)
    I have a few friends that did summer work in 'Ici Paris' - I doubt you have those in the UK, but they're really popular beauty stores (make-up, perfume, skin products etc.) in Belgium and the Netherlands.
    The people who work there have to 'advice' costumers what to buy, but they're not really honest. They all have to reach a weekly 'target'; sell five Chanel products, five by Dior etc. So when they give people advice to buy X over Y, it's just to reach their target, not because it's really what that person is looking for.
    That's the case in many places. It's not so much for personal targets, it's more to do with making as much money as possible. Electronics stores (Currys, Comet etc) are terrible for this - they'll always try to sell you something more expensive than you want and add ons like warranties and accessories.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    You'd think it would be common knowledge but you'd be surprised how many people are completely oblivious to it.
    How many people do you see taking stuff from the back of the shelves, which you'd assume they would do if they knew there was newer stuff there...? Not many.
    That's why my mum doesn't like buying groceries from Tesco Online - the staff will just pick the stuff from the front.

    Never believe someone in a perfume counter when they tell you a perfume is nice....they say they're all nice!
 
 
 
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