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6th Years and Leavers :: Chat Thread #1 watch

  • View Poll Results: Highest Mark in the AH Maths Prelim :: YOUR BETS (Votes are public)
    namedeprived
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    Ape Gone Insane [No one's going to vote for me ]
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    Me, I take AH Maths!
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    APE! You wasted your one chance of a poll...on THIS! NOOOOOO
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    :love:

    Not bad, but still one of the worst versions i've heard of it. Lacks good use of dynamics. Nothing has come close to touching Buckley's version.
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    Bit quiet so you have to turn it up, but my god this is beautiful.

    Edit - Found a far better version
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    I've never heard of her before tbh, I encountered the cover version on one of the mods profiles and it's better than that Alexandra woman's version. Well, they are both different and better in their own ways.
    She is one of my favourite female artists, love this song:
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    (Original post by Meteorshower)


    Bit quiet so you have to turn it up, but my god this is beautiful.

    Edit - Found a far better version
    Wow, that gives me chills just listening to that!
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    (Original post by Meteorshower)


    Bit quiet so you have to turn it up, but my god this is beautiful.

    Edit - Found a far better version
    fugal, modes, plagal cadence....arghhh!!! Too much in one day.:eek3:
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Wow, Meteorshower..

    1) That really is beautiful. Going to get it for my iPod.
    2) I've heard that tune before 0.18-0.27 seconds into the video..I've been looking for that song that has that tune as it's main theme. It was played ALOT during that Da Vinci film ... Was it some other famous hymn/song or was it this song?

    I've been looking for point number 2) for a long time.

    Help.

    I think the Da Vinci code has it's own soundtrack... Almost certain Miserere isn't part of it.

    The piece has an interesting history though, it was part of the Catholic ceremony "Tenebrae" and was only performed in the Sistine chapel in the holy week annually. Anyone who performed it elsewhere or wrote it down faced excommunication. It was originally composed during the 1630's and it wasn't til a 14 year old Mozart wrote it down perfectly that it was ever properly done outside the Sistine chapel. The pope didn't even excommunicate Mozart, because he was so impressed with his musical genius :p:
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    I see others are on the depressing music thread

    Just listened to sleeper 1972

    I'm like..ahh
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    And in case your bored of the human voice -


    Thus ends Meteorshower's *****in' music guide for the day :p:
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Mozart, I wish I lived in "those" times especially in the time of Da Vinci..imagine being Da Vinci's apprentice.

    Anyways a slight departure from Mozart but some music you may like, old and new.
    I really like the first one! Hadn't heard that before, thanks :yep: Well, at least the first minute or so :p:

    I love clubbed to death aswell :cool:

    Not to keen on the last one though :p:

    I'm quite happy with the times we are in now. Remember we tend to over-romanticise certain periods of history, lack of personal hygiene whatsoever is enough to put me off the renaissance period - however good the art and science scene was!
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    Is the piece not called Lux Aeterna? I know one version of it is called requiem for a tower also, can't remember which is which though! All I know is that's it's just the film that's called requiem for a dream.

    Also, each piece I posted was very very old :p: All 1600's I think. What did you think of the third? I think it's slow but ridiculously powerful at times.
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    Night ape!

    I think i'm gonna go for a 15 mile walk...
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    (Original post by Meteorshower)
    I'm quite happy with the times we are in now. Remember we tend to over-romanticise certain periods of history
    Nah; it's no romanticising, it's a pining for a wholly vanished sense of culture and artistry. The digital age has brought with it so many sacrifices -- music has transformed from a sacred art to a common triviality, a bit of background noise. We're a hopeless generation. Will there be a Tolstoy of the 21st century? Like hell will there be, he got Sky Plus HD last week! You expect him to bother with all those damned... words?!

    There's juicy irony in the way that a decidely enlightened age (advent of the information zenith known as the internet, wide accessibility to television broadcasting educational programmes, et cetera) has brought with it a side-effect of inducing extreme ignorance. Don't listen to me, though.

    Listen to this.

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    (Original post by Pedrobear)
    Nah; it's no romanticising, it's a pining for a wholly vanished sense of culture and artistry. The digital age has brought with it so many sacrifices -- music has transformed from a sacred art to a common triviality, a bit of background noise. We're a hopeless generation. Will there be a Tolstoy of the 21st century? Like hell will there be, he got Sky Plus HD last week! You expect him to bother with all those damned... words?!

    There's juicy irony in the way that a decidely enlightened age (advent of the information zenith known as the internet, wide accessibility to television broadcasting educational programmes, et cetera) has brought with it a side-effect of inducing extreme ignorance. Don't listen to me, though.

    Listen to this.

    I think you're being a tad melodramatic. Sure, if you pick the pinnacles of musical and literary achievement over a vast period of time, then you paint a rather pleasant picture of the past. There are many examples of musical brilliance in the modern age though, they just tend to get overlooked by the popular stuff (which in my opinion and i guess yours, is mostly crap) Do you think in the renaissance period (or any other than the modern age actually) the masses were ever that interested in what we consider now to be the geniuses of their age? Most probably couldn't afford to go and hear some Mozart.

    Now there is unparallelled access to music and literature (and whatever else takes your fancy) than ever before. There is unparallelled creativity, if you look beyond the corporate hit machines that tend to occupy the charts. You can moan that most people don't appreciate the finer things in life all you want, but that doesn't stop you doing so
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    brilliant, been asking for flaming lips tickets for my borthday for the past 2 months, reminded my mum just now and she said no not for some thing i've never head of

    WTF , it's not like i' asking for a car like every other 17 year old, just a ticket to see a band

    how.annoying
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    (Original post by Meteorshower)
    I think you're being a tad melodramatic. Sure, if you pick the pinnacles of musical and literary achievement over a vast period of time, then you paint a rather pleasant picture of the past. There are many examples of musical brilliance in the modern age though, they just tend to get overlooked by the popular stuff (which in my opinion and i guess yours, is mostly crap) Do you think in the renaissance period (or any other than the modern age actually) the masses were ever that interested in what we consider now to be the geniuses of their age? Most probably couldn't afford to go and hear some Mozart.

    Now there is unparallelled access to music and literature (and whatever else takes your fancy) than ever before. There is unparallelled creativity, if you look beyond the corporate hit machines that tend to occupy the charts. You can moan that most people don't appreciate the finer things in life all you want, but that doesn't stop you doing so
    Of course, didn't mean to sound as though I was bemoaning the whole century or something (that'd be a little farsighted if it's the 21st we're talking about, anyway, hehe). The advantages of our age are indisputable. For one, to stay on the topic of music, we have recordings of it all! We can stick a CD in or go on youtube as I did and it's there, instantly. A pretty stark contrast to say 200 years ago when I'd have either had to make the effort to attend a concert, or learn a piece by myself to hear it (though maybe it could be argued that there'd be a greater appreciation of the music in the latter case?).

    I suppose the main gripe I have with our age is how "disposable" everything has become. You want to see the Mona Lisa? Google it. Open it. Open another scan of it in a tab. Then close it on a whim. Sure, that's always been somewhat possible through books, but not on anywhere near such a scale as now.

    It'd be foolish to say a whole period of time is invariably crap, and we'll no doubt have our geniuses and epochs as judged by historians in the 22nd century. And on a matter which is, when it really comes down to it, more important than art, the state of our medicine is not to be scoffed at. The difference in living standards between now and 200 years ago is astounding. And, always important as you'll no doubt agree, the extent of our scientific knowledge is simply fantastic. The important position reason and rationality are gradually gaining to the general public, and the recognition of atheism as an acceptable (and often preferable!) standpoint must be in part a result of this -- I wouldn't be surprised if the next 100 years come to be remembered as a time of great scientific progress and understanding, more than anything else.

    The choral piece you posted before is gorgeous, by the way.
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    Ive eat alot of haribo.

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    (Original post by nessiehibs)
    Ive eat alot of haribo.

    :facepalm:
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    (Original post by Pedrobear)
    Of course, didn't mean to sound as though I was bemoaning the whole century or something (that'd be a little farsighted if it's the 21st we're talking about, anyway, hehe). The advantages of our age are indisputable. For one, to stay on the topic of music, we have recordings of it all! We can stick a CD in or go on youtube as I did and it's there, instantly. A pretty stark contrast to say 200 years ago when I'd have either had to make the effort to attend a concert, or learn a piece by myself to hear it (though maybe it could be argued that there'd be a greater appreciation of the music in the latter case?).

    I suppose the main gripe I have with our age is how "disposable" everything has become. You want to see the Mona Lisa? Google it. Open it. Open another scan of it in a tab. Then close it on a whim. Sure, that's always been somewhat possible through books, but not on anywhere near such a scale as now.

    It'd be foolish to say a whole period of time is invariably crap, and we'll no doubt have our geniuses and epochs as judged by historians in the 22nd century. And on a matter which is, when it really comes down to it, more important than art, the state of our medicine is not to be scoffed at. The difference in living standards between now and 200 years ago is astounding. And, always important as you'll no doubt agree, the extent of our scientific knowledge is simply fantastic. The important position reason and rationality are gradually gaining to the general public, and the recognition of atheism as an acceptable (and often preferable!) standpoint must be in part a result of this -- I wouldn't be surprised if the next 100 years come to be remembered as a time of great scientific progress and understanding, more than anything else.

    The choral piece you posted before is gorgeous, by the way.
    I see I misunderstood you then! I'm glad :p:

    My main point of contention with your gripes (albeit minor ones) is that yeah, many people might glance over the Mona Lisa or read a wikipedia article on a book rather than the book itself or whatever, but you still get those who do things the way it's always been done. You still get plenty of people flocking to the louvre from all over the world to marvel at the displays. You still get those who learn centuries old pieces of music by ear, because they can't read music and you most certainly get those who study philosophy to a high level, with the widening of education.

    You just also have people that aren't that interested, like before. Except now they can have a look to see what all the fuss about, and make a slightly more informed opinion on whatever it is is worth their attention.

    Ignore all the Big brother, x factor and paris hilton style crap around these days, and celebrate the richness and diversity of all disciplines nowadays. You probably already do though :p:

    With regards to science, it is progressing at an alarming speed. I think since the 1600's it's been advancing exponentially quickly, and I see no reason to believe why it should stop now. The industrial revolution changed the world immeasurably, but in a sense it hasn't really stopped.

    I saw a version of this with statistics tailored to Scotland a couple of months ago in a large auditorium after a fairly impressive talk by the chief HMI inspector. I found myself very moved by it :o: helps that the music is great too.

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    How can you have a bet on who's going to get the highest in the AH Maths Prelim when someone can just easily claim to get the highest mark after hearing what everyone else has got? :lolwut:
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    Hah that video is quite insightful indeed, made me pause for thought a few times. If I type any more tonight my arms will commit suicide so I'll refrain for now but thanks for the discussion. It's always good to reflect on these things, even if the conclusions aren't always pleasant as a whole. :p:
 
 
 
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