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so depressed...what can i do? Watch

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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    trust me...it always gets out...some people find out their STD test results before they've gone back to the doctor for the results
    well that's extremely unprofessional, doctor's can get struck off for disclosing things about patient's so I'm not quite sure how that would have happened!
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    You can't run away from it. The most the GP could do is refer you out to a counsellor or put you on pills. And yes if it did get out then there's probably a receptionist to blame somewhere but you can't live like this. What happens when it starts affecting your college work? The more you try to deny it, the harder it will be to get help.
    I would like to tell my mum how I feel as she's a nurse but she'd probably laugh it off and say I don't know what real depression is like. That's the kinda family I have.
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    (Original post by lilsuperhunni)
    You can't run away from it. The most the GP could do is refer you out to a counsellor or put you on pills. And yes if it did get out then there's probably a receptionist to blame somewhere but you can't live like this. What happens when it starts affecting your college work? The more you try to deny it, the harder it will be to get help.
    I would like to tell my mum how I feel as she's a nurse but she'd probably laugh it off and say I don't know what real depression is like. That's the kinda family I have.
    i cant tell any of my family, my dad doesnt "believe" in depression, so my mum would just dismiss it because, as i was thinking last night, shes soo under his thumb its not even funny.

    i dont need a counsellor, cos theres nothing to talk about, cos theres nothing that i can think of that started these feelings...and i dont want pills, cos as i said then the college have to know

    i dunno...i might make an appointment friday...only problem is i'll have my godson with me
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    well that's extremely unprofessional, doctor's can get struck off for disclosing things about patient's so I'm not quite sure how that would have happened!
    we dont know how it happened...it did...as 'hunni said it was probably a receptionist or something
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    we dont know how it happened...it did...as 'hunni said it was probably a receptionist or something
    ah i see. well this'd be different i'm assuming... i suppose the receptionist's get the results through the post or whatever, but the GP wouldn't be telling the receptionist about people that he sees.
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    Just cos you have your godson with you shouldn't make it a problem. Most likely they'll think your going in to see the GP about him. And counselling will help cos they know the right questions to ask in order to determine what's affecting you. Like I said, your family aren't gonna be helpful so you need outside help. Just try your best.
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    i cant tell any of my family, my dad doesnt "believe" in depression, so my mum would just dismiss it because, as i was thinking last night, shes soo under his thumb its not even funny.

    i dont need a counsellor, cos theres nothing to talk about, cos theres nothing that i can think of that started these feelings...and i dont want pills, cos as i said then the college have to know

    i dunno...i might make an appointment friday...only problem is i'll have my godson with me
    Well that's what their job is, it may not be obvious for you but they can help you dig around to find out why you're feeling this way. and yeh if you go to the doctors they will just give you pills. Either way you need to do something, or else it will probably get worse..maybe even go down the natural path?
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    thing is i have good days and bad days and i just know when i go to the docs i'll be havng a good day and they'll think im attention seeking or something
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    natural path? like what?
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    thing is i have good days and bad days and i just know when i go to the docs i'll be havng a good day and they'll think im attention seeking or something
    No they won't. Chances are your GP has seen many many many people before you with exactly the same problem, and he won;t think you attention seeking for going, and being honest. If you're having a good/better day he's not going to turn you away and laugh at you. Like I keep saying, you have nothing to lose from going to the doctors. And you won't gain anything from sitting back and doing nothing either.
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    possibly because its holiday or because i feel so down...i just dont want to do anything, i dont want to see anyone and i just want to sleep. and it could be down to the fact that i cant get the guy i want and i know i never will, but i've been feeling like this for ages, its not just about him.

    i cant tell my mates, one of them had PND but managed to almost sort herself out, and all my other friends seem to think depression is self indulgant thats why i've been trying so hard to keep myself as normal as i can around everyone. plus i dont really have that many close friends that i can trust with anything
    It's funny, because I've been thinking a lot about a girl I used to know recently. It's been bothering me, because it's on my mind all the time, but there's nothing I can do. So it's not worth thinking about.
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    No they won't. Chances are your GP has seen many many many people before you with exactly the same problem, and he won;t think you attention seeking for going, and being honest. If you're having a good/better day he's not going to turn you away and laugh at you. Like I keep saying, you have nothing to lose from going to the doctors. And you won't gain anything from sitting back and doing nothing either.
    i know i need to do something, but i dont know tbh if i have the "balls" to do what needs to be done
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    i know i need to do something, but i dont know tbh if i have the "balls" to do what needs to be done
    To be completely honest, it depends if you can live with it. If you leave it you might reach the point where you HAVE to get help so it's best to catch it before you get to that stage because it really isn't something you want to go through alone. I do completely understand where you're coming from parent-wise though. When I was in hospital, the first thing my dad asked when he saw the doctor was 'Does depression have a stigma?' and my mum kept going on about how I wasn't really ill. My parents only really care about their pride and how they look to other people.

    Please go to your GP, just to see what they can do for you. I promise you, it won't be anywhere near as bad as you're building it up to be.
    :hugs:
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    When I feel miserable, I tend to crack a few beers and go and play with the car.
    Try it and see how you get on?

    Take care,

    JC.
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    (Original post by diamonddust)
    To be completely honest, it depends if you can live with it. If you leave it you might reach the point where you HAVE to get help so it's best to catch it before you get to that stage because it really isn't something you want to go through alone. I do completely understand where you're coming from parent-wise though. When I was in hospital, the first thing my dad asked when he saw the doctor was 'Does depression have a stigma?' and my mum kept going on about how I wasn't really ill. My parents only really care about their pride and how they look to other people.

    Please go to your GP, just to see what they can do for you. I promise you, it won't be anywhere near as bad as you're building it up to be.
    :hugs:
    im gonna try and get an appointment without telling anyone
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    (Original post by JC.)
    When I feel miserable, I tend to crack a few beers and go and play with the car.
    Try it and see how you get on?

    Take care,

    JC.
    and im not drinking anymore and i have no car to play with

    and this is a little more serious that a "beer" moment i think

    x
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    im really depressed at the moment, i just feel weepy and like i wanna cry all the time and i keep snapping at people. im sleeping like 10/12 hours a day but waking up just as tired as i was the night before. i just feel so lethargic and even now as i write this im trying not to cry

    what can i do? do i go to my GP? and what do i tell him/her???

    i just want to be back to my normal self...no ones noticed theres anything wrong so far, not even my 2 closest mates, so im hiding it well, but i dont wanna hide it i wanna be me again x
    Ah. Transference I see (from last thread). Or attention seeking?

    Symptoms and signs
    Major depression is a serious illness that affects a person's family, work or school life, sleeping and eating habits, and general health.[1] Its impact on functioning and well-being has been equated to that of chronic medical conditions such as diabetes.[2]

    A person suffering a major depressive episode usually exhibits a very low mood that pervades all aspects of life and an inability to experience pleasure in activities that formerly were enjoyed. Depressed people may be preoccupied with, or ruminate over, thoughts and feelings of worthlessness, inappropriate guilt or regret, helplessness, hopelessness, and self-hatred.[3] Other symptoms include poor concentration and memory (especially in those with with melancholic or psychotic features),[4] withdrawal from social situations and activities, reduced sex drive, and thoughts of death or suicide. Insomnia is common: in the typical pattern, a person wakes very early and is unable to get back to sleep.[5] Hypersomnia, or oversleeping, is less common.[5] Appetite often decreases, with resulting weight loss, although increased appetite and weight gain occasionally occur.[3] The person may report multiple physical symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, or digestive problems; physical complaints are the most common presenting problem in developing countries according to the World Health Organization's criteria of depression.[6] Family and friends may notice that the person's behavior is either agitated or lethargic.[5]

    Older depressed persons may have cognitive symptoms of recent onset, such as forgetfulness,[4] and a more noticeable slowing of movements.[dead link][7] Depression often coexists with physical disorders common among the elderly, such as stroke, other cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson's disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[8]

    In severe cases, depressed people may have symptoms of psychosis such as delusions or, less commonly, hallucinations, usually of an unpleasant nature.[9]

    Depressed children often display an irritable rather than a depressed mood,[3] and show varying symptoms depending on age and situation.[10] Most exhibit a loss of interest in school and a decline in academic performance. They may be described as clingy, demanding, dependent, or insecure.[5] Diagnosis may be delayed or missed when symptoms are interpreted as normal moodiness.[3] Depression may also coincide with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, complicating the diagnosis and treatment of both.[11]

    Mental illness is no joke, I hope you are telling the truth. Odd you have two problems.

    See GP for medication. See counsellor for counselling
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    and im not drinking anymore and i have no car to play with

    and this is a little more serious that a "beer" moment i think

    x
    Not sure what to tell you tbh...
    Other than that you need to find some ways to fill your time?

    My hotrod needs to be serviced, the suspension needs greasing and my trailer needs new brakes if you're bored! lol


    Seriously... just find something you enjoy doing and put your energy into it. that'll be a start.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Ah. Transference I see (from last thread). Or attention seeking?

    Symptoms and signs
    Major depression is a serious illness that affects a person's family, work or school life, sleeping and eating habits, and general health.[1] Its impact on functioning and well-being has been equated to that of chronic medical conditions such as diabetes.[2]

    A person suffering a major depressive episode usually exhibits a very low mood that pervades all aspects of life and an inability to experience pleasure in activities that formerly were enjoyed. Depressed people may be preoccupied with, or ruminate over, thoughts and feelings of worthlessness, inappropriate guilt or regret, helplessness, hopelessness, and self-hatred.[3] Other symptoms include poor concentration and memory (especially in those with with melancholic or psychotic features),[4] withdrawal from social situations and activities, reduced sex drive, and thoughts of death or suicide. Insomnia is common: in the typical pattern, a person wakes very early and is unable to get back to sleep.[5] Hypersomnia, or oversleeping, is less common.[5] Appetite often decreases, with resulting weight loss, although increased appetite and weight gain occasionally occur.[3] The person may report multiple physical symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, or digestive problems; physical complaints are the most common presenting problem in developing countries according to the World Health Organization's criteria of depression.[6] Family and friends may notice that the person's behavior is either agitated or lethargic.[5]

    Older depressed persons may have cognitive symptoms of recent onset, such as forgetfulness,[4] and a more noticeable slowing of movements.[dead link][7] Depression often coexists with physical disorders common among the elderly, such as stroke, other cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson's disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[8]

    In severe cases, depressed people may have symptoms of psychosis such as delusions or, less commonly, hallucinations, usually of an unpleasant nature.[9]

    Depressed children often display an irritable rather than a depressed mood,[3] and show varying symptoms depending on age and situation.[10] Most exhibit a loss of interest in school and a decline in academic performance. They may be described as clingy, demanding, dependent, or insecure.[5] Diagnosis may be delayed or missed when symptoms are interpreted as normal moodiness.[3] Depression may also coincide with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, complicating the diagnosis and treatment of both.[11]

    Mental illness is no joke, I hope you are telling the truth. Odd you have two problems.

    See GP for medication. See counsellor for counselling
    what two problems??? i thought i only had one!
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Ah. Transference I see (from last thread). Or attention seeking?

    Symptoms and signs
    Major depression is a serious illness that affects a person's family, work or school life, sleeping and eating habits, and general health.[1] Its impact on functioning and well-being has been equated to that of chronic medical conditions such as diabetes.[2]

    A person suffering a major depressive episode usually exhibits a very low mood that pervades all aspects of life and an inability to experience pleasure in activities that formerly were enjoyed. Depressed people may be preoccupied with, or ruminate over, thoughts and feelings of worthlessness, inappropriate guilt or regret, helplessness, hopelessness, and self-hatred.[3] Other symptoms include poor concentration and memory (especially in those with with melancholic or psychotic features),[4] withdrawal from social situations and activities, reduced sex drive, and thoughts of death or suicide. Insomnia is common: in the typical pattern, a person wakes very early and is unable to get back to sleep.[5] Hypersomnia, or oversleeping, is less common.[5] Appetite often decreases, with resulting weight loss, although increased appetite and weight gain occasionally occur.[3] The person may report multiple physical symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, or digestive problems; physical complaints are the most common presenting problem in developing countries according to the World Health Organization's criteria of depression.[6] Family and friends may notice that the person's behavior is either agitated or lethargic.[5]

    Older depressed persons may have cognitive symptoms of recent onset, such as forgetfulness,[4] and a more noticeable slowing of movements.[dead link][7] Depression often coexists with physical disorders common among the elderly, such as stroke, other cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson's disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[8]

    In severe cases, depressed people may have symptoms of psychosis such as delusions or, less commonly, hallucinations, usually of an unpleasant nature.[9]

    Depressed children often display an irritable rather than a depressed mood,[3] and show varying symptoms depending on age and situation.[10] Most exhibit a loss of interest in school and a decline in academic performance. They may be described as clingy, demanding, dependent, or insecure.[5] Diagnosis may be delayed or missed when symptoms are interpreted as normal moodiness.[3] Depression may also coincide with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, complicating the diagnosis and treatment of both.[11]

    Mental illness is no joke, I hope you are telling the truth. Odd you have two problems.

    See GP for medication. See counsellor for counselling
    oh and why would i lie about something thats making me feel so bad i barely even wanna go see the one thing that makes me happy...my godson
 
 
 
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