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    As a relative newcomer, all I've been reading is the FT and its markets section..

    I think I've learnt quite a lot from it, gives me a good idea of the markets etc. but the analysis isn't very in-depth...also I hear a lot of people slating it.

    What should I read instead then?
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    'The Economist' is a very useful publication, so is 'The Week', in terms of building up a wider picture of things. If you want to know what certain terms and jargon mean, then check out a website called Investopedia. Otherwise, reading the FT is enough as far as I'm concerned!
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    (Original post by loggins)
    'The Economist' is a very useful publication, so is 'The Week', in terms of building up a wider picture of things. If you want to know what certain terms and jargon mean, then check out a website called Investopedia. Otherwise, reading the FT is enough as far as I'm concerned!
    I do regularly read the Economist too, forgot to mention, but less from an investment perspective and more from a what's-happening-in-the-world perspective.
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    (Original post by El Mariachi)
    I do regularly read the Economist too, forgot to mention, but less from an investment perspective and more from a what's-happening-in-the-world perspective.
    Ok. Cool...
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    Reading is over-rated. Understanding isn't.
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    I think dealbreaker and the LEX-section of the FT have a lot of relevant and in-depth articles on financial events.

    On another note, I think it's better to first study the basics of how financial markets work before starting to read the financial press. As has been mentioned above, there's no use in reading something you can't make sense out of. I'm hardly an expert, but learning about how the Income Statement/Balance Sheet/Cash Flow Statement are structured and how they're intertwined might be a good starting point (provided of course that you don't know this already). Then, you might want to consider learning more about fundamental valuation techniques, and the equity and bond markets.

    Anyway, despite knowing all the basics, just reading the papers aimlessly won't do you much good. Rather, I'd suggest trying to actively predict events - makes reading the papers much more of an engaging experience.

    You may want to have a look at one of these books (http://www.thegatewayonline.com/article.php?id=186) - I'll mark the one's that I've personally learnt a lot from in green:
    "Recommended reading: the 20 books that everyone interviewing for a graduate job in investment banking should have read
    General
    1. “Vault Guide to Investment Banking” – Tom Lott – the easiest-to-read and most informative guide we have seen about investment banking; essential reading

    2. “Vault Guide to Finance Interviews” – D. Bhatawedekhar – introduction to some of the technical knowledge required across all aspects of banking and finance

    3. “All You Need to Know About the City: Who Does What and Why in London’s Financial Markets” - Christopher Stoakes – An interesting and comprehensive introduction to the world of banking. Easy to read.

    4. “Accounts Demystified” – Anthony Rice – the best introduction we have seen to accounting for non-accountants

    5. “The Age of Turbulence” – Alan Greenspan – the best insight into global macro economic forces over the last 30 years, despite the recent bursting of the Greenspan bubble.
    Corporate Finance / M&A

    6. “Acquisition Essentials: A Step-by-Step Guide to Smarter Deals” – Denzil Rankine & Peter Howson – a good introduction to the different stages of a deal
    7. “Corporate Valuation” – David Frykman – the best introduction to the key subject of valuation; easier to read than either of the classics Copeland or Brearley and Myers 8. “Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies” – Tom Copeland – classic textbook, quite technical
    9. “Principles of Corporate Finance” – Richard Brearley and Stuart Myers – classic textbook, rather heavy and very technical
    10. “Monkey Business” – two years in the life of an investment banking analyst…easy to read and quite humorous

    11. “Big Deal” – Bruce Wasserstein – dauntingly large book, but actually very readable and easy to understand; starts with account of major recent M&A deals, then reviews the classic M&A / corporate finance services and techniques

    12. “Barbarians at the Gate” – Bryan Burrough and John Helyar – classic business biography of the take-over of RJR Nabsisco in 1988; a thrilling account of a real deal; reads like a novel.
    Financial Markets

    13. “Vault Guide to Sales and Trading” – Gabriel Kim – the best starting point for this area; we cannot recommend the Vault Guides highly enough
    14. “Vault Guide to Investment Management” – Andrew Schlossberg – again, great introduction; pulls off that rare trick of balancing being easy-to-read with having sufficient detail
    15. “How the Bond Market Works” – Robert Zipf – easy to understand textbook
    16. “Mastering Credit Derivatives: A step-by-step guide to credit derivatives and their application” – Andrew Kasapi
    17. “Market Wizards – Interviews with Top Traders” – Jack Schwager – strange book – quite involved and is a compilation of interviews with traders about their trading strategies – for wannabe traders
    18. “Liars Poker” – Michael Lewis – classic real-life account of Michael Lewis’ career as a bond trader at Salomon in London, where he reported to John Merriweather (see When Genius Failed)
    19. “Den Of Thieves” – James Stewart – similar in style to ‘Barbarians’, but gives an account of the insider trading in the 1980s that brought down Michael Milken and Drexel Burnham Lambert; again reads like a thriller
    20. “When Genius Failed – The Rise and Fall of Long Term Capital Management” – Roger Lowenstein – true-life account of the rise and fall of the largest hedge fund in the world run by John Merriweather – the star character in Michael Lewis’ Liars Poker. "

    Oh, and don't get the Vault guides, they suck.
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    Mankiw's blog
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    Cheers guys, that's well helpful.

    I understand most of what I read, and I think that's the problem - it's a bit too baisc/I'm not reading the right thing.

    Have ordered some of those books already so will read them, cheers on the blogs too, that's a good idea, comments will probably be quite interesting too.

    Cheers my dears.
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    I usually listen to MDs/VPs (advantage of being at a boutique) chatting on phone to people about the industry, various sectors etc. IMO, much better than anything else.

    Of course, FT is good too.
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    (Original post by Capocrimini)
    Oh, and don't get the Vault guides, they suck.
    Maybe so.. But there isn't much better out there as a basic introduction to IB
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    I actually found the Vault guide to IB a decent starting point, about 3 years ago :o: . Make sure you get the European version though.
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    Vault ranking guide gets outdated pretty quickly though.

    No, seriously, the best stuff to read is on this sub-forum. It's free, opinionated and straight to the point.
 
 
 
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