Turn on thread page Beta
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    My acne has bothered me since september. It's always been pretty mild but it still really affects my self-esteem. After months of trying various products witohut prescription (i.e. cleansers, benzoyl peroxide etc) I decided to see my GP about it about 2 months ago.
    He first prescribed me a topical antibiotic (clindamycin - brand name dalacin-t), then after a month of no improvement (personally i think it got worse) he prescribed me an oral antibiotic (lymecycline) - it's helped a bit but no where near enough to satisfy me.
    It's been really getting me down so next time I go (I go back at six weeks since starting - a week from now) I'm gonna ask for a referral to a dermatologist (I know there's waiting lists but I'm gonna go private so hopefully that'll be quicker). When I see the dermotologist, will he prescribe me another antibiotic (I'm sceptic of these - none seem to have improved my skin much) or will he prescribe me roaccutane (my acne is mild but it hasn't responded much to anthing else) which I've heard is really effective (yes, I know about the side-effects).

    Roaccutane users - What was your course of medication until getting prescribed accutane?
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    bumpppppppppppppppppppp
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hello! Similar situation for me a couple of years back. Doctor prescribed many things to me with no improvement so I saw the dermatologist and he gave me an antibiotic called Minocycline and a cream called Differin/Adapalene Gel. I used the antibiotics for about 6 months and in that time it had made me more or less spot free, I was exstatic! I had had moderate acne on my face back and chest and it had cleared it all up. I used it for about 2 years and it stayed fine for about 8 months after I stopped taking it and then I started to get some spots back but they are no where near as bad as before. I use just the cream still now which I think is keeping them away from my back and chest quite well, I still get some on my face but I think I am much happier than I was. I hope they prescribe you this because it really really worked for me.

    I don't think they will prescribe roaccutane for mild acne, they should give you something like what i had, if not the same one. I think Minocycline is the best thing that the doctors have ever prescribed me, and it does good going to the dermatologist, i felt like they understand what you're going through lol and they prescribe you something that they know will cheer up your life, i felt very positive after my trip there and excited to be on the road to getting rid of my spots lol!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You'll be extremely unlikely to get roaccutane with mild acne after having tried antibiotics for only two months. The next step will most likely be oral and topical treatment together. I had to wait 2 years to be referred for roaccutane.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    OP, you need several treatments before going on roaccutane. My acne is mild (not extremely bad) and I've had four treatments. I've been treated for 2/3 years. I'm on oxytetracycline now and should it fail I'm starting a course of roaccutane. I got a referral to the dermatologist very quickly (within a few weeks) are you sure there are waiting lists?

    They CAN give roaccutane for mild acne.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Lymecycline is crap. Hardly works at all. Try something called quinoderm. Availiable over the counter.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    tbh you're unlikely to be put onto Roaccutane unless you have bad cystic acne which hasn't responded to anti-biotics or dermal treatments.

    I honestly can't remember the exact treatments or what duration I was given them but basically I was given oral and dermal antibiotics and then 0.01% retin-a gel and finally I was put onto Roaccutane. Worth noting this was over a period of years, you're unlikely to be given anything like Roaccutane or even Retin-A for a long time yet.

    EDIT- Although, as someone else mentioned there does seem to be more people getting it for mild acne which is frankly irresponsible. The complications that can arise from it's use are serious.

    There are a lot of simple things that you yourself can do to help your skin like up your vitamin A intake a bit, drink more water, go swimming, B5 supplementation helps some people aswell and there's always clearasil et al which I think is very good. Diluted TCP is good to use before bed and because it's diluted you're able to get rid of the smell with a shower in the morning.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zedd)
    tbh you're unlikely to be put onto Roaccutane unless you have bad cystic acne which hasn't responded to anti-biotics or dermal treatments.

    I honestly can't remember the exact treatments or what duration I was given them but basically I was given oral and dermal antibiotics and then 0.01% retin-a gel and finally I was put onto Roaccutane. Worth noting this was over a period of years, you're unlikely to be given anything like Roaccutane or even Retin-A for a long time yet.

    EDIT- Although, as someone else mentioned there does seem to be more people getting it for mild acne which is frankly irresponsible. The complications that can arise from it's use are serious.

    There are a lot of simple things that you yourself can do to help your skin like up your vitamin A intake a bit, drink more water, go swimming, B5 supplementation helps some people aswell and there's always clearasil et al which I think is very good. Diluted TCP is good to use before bed and because it's diluted you're able to get rid of the smell with a shower in the morning.
    If you are referring to me, I had severe acne before I started any antibiotics. I realise, I didn't explain my situation properly. Now, my acne is mild because I've just come off an antibiotic which stopped working. It's just started flaring again. If I have no treatment it will become severe again. So I meant that Roaccutane would possibly be used to treat my acne that is mild for now. I've had nearly all the treatments which have stopped working after a few months/weeks. Do they give you routine blood tests if you're on roaccutane? I've only read what they do in the US not here.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    If you are referring to me, I had severe acne before I started any antibiotics. I realise, I didn't explain my situation properly. Now, my acne is mild because I've just come off an antibiotic which stopped working. It's just started flaring again. If I have no treatment it will become severe again. So I meant that Roaccutane would possibly be used to treat my acne that is mild for now. I've had nearly all the treatments which have stopped working after a few months/weeks. Do they give you routine blood tests if you're on roaccutane? I've only read what they do in the US not here.
    Ah well that makes more sense and I can understand that.

    I'm not sure about England. However, they were supposed to do regular blood tests for me etc but in the end all they did was a blood check before, one at the mid-point and that was all I got. For girls in particular it's important that they do checkups because there are more potential complications (pregnancy being the big one).

    It's a bit odd because they were very willy-nilly about it with me, once the initial blood test came back fine they basically gave me the entire course of treatment and didn't contact me for a while...

    Off the top of my head and as I understand it, treatment length is based upon total dose (something like 9800mg) divided by daily dose (which is determined on your weight, usually dosed at 1mg/kg bodyweight).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey, just thought I would share my 2 cents on it. Acne cannot be solved by treating the symptoms, ie using topical creams. You need to tackle the cause of acne. Western medicine is all about treating symptoms but never the root cause. Acne is a warning sign from your body that you have a hormonal imbalance. Basically look it up on the net it is your liver that needs a detox. Once you do this you will find that your acne goes away without the messy creams and dangerous drugs.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BrianGretzky99)
    Hey, just thought I would share my 2 cents on it. Acne cannot be solved by treating the symptoms, ie using topical creams. You need to tackle the cause of acne. Western medicine is all about treating symptoms but never the root cause. Acne is a warning sign from your body that you have a hormonal imbalance. Basically look it up on the net it is your liver that needs a detox. Once you do this you will find that your acne goes away without the messy creams and dangerous drugs.

    I agree with BrianGretzky99 on this. The harsh creams wont work. The acne is a sign that your body is repelling toxins. Try an elimination diet. Two or three days of eating purely raw fruit and veg with water, then cut out dairy, then wheat to see what causes it.

    The majority of skin complaints are due to a food intolerence. I cured my bad skin by cutting out dairy.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: August 6, 2009
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.