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is MUM MENTAL?? watch

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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Potentially, it could be.

    A schizophrenic running around the streets screaming his face off could be given an ASBO. Does this mean in your opinion he is not mentally ill?

    Your argument is so incoherent that it is near impossible to take your logic and show it back to you. Are you trying to tell me that mental illness ISN'T defined through behaviour?
    Lol :facepalm: You do Philosophy too? Well in theory God could exist, in theory God couldn't. However, the schizo would get locked up most likely showing signs as he's so bad. A normal person from a lower socio-economic background who get the ABSO.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Is English your first language?



    Then why the **** are you here telling me that "they have proven x y and z"?

    Jesus christ..
    Yes. I have a good enough reason. BTW, you could upset many a dsyekic (sp?) by saying that.

    I over-generalised. I'm not the first person to do that.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Lol :facepalm: You do Philosophy too? Well in theory God could exist, in theory God couldn't. However, the schizo would get locked up most likely showing signs as he's so bad. A normal person from a lower socio-economic background who get the ABSO.
    I'm only going to address the bolded part of this post, considering you have failed to string together any sensical sentences in the rest of it. (Also ignoring the fact that yet again you have failed to see the original point of my post, which was addressing your bizarre differentiation of "behavioural illness" and "mental illness" ).

    Returning to the bolded part of your post:
    Are you not aware that mental illness is far more prevalent in those existing within lower socio-economic backgrounds?

    But other than that, I refuse to have this debate with you if you're incapable of stringing complete sentences together.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I'm only going to address the bolded part of this post, considering you have failed to string together any sensical sentences in the rest of it. (Also ignoring the fact that yet again you have failed to see the original point of my post, which was addressing your bizarre differentiation of "behavioural illness" and "mental illness" ).

    Returning to the bolded part of your post:
    Are you not aware that mental illness is far more prevalent in those existing within lower socio-economic backgrounds?

    But other than that, I refuse to have this debate with you if you're incapable of stringing complete sentences together.
    It's 1am in the morning. I'm tired. I was up at 10am to go work a job at Mc Donalds (it's p/t). Go figure.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    It's 1am in the morning. I'm tired. I was up at 10am to go work a job at Mc Donalds (it's p/t). Go figure.
    Please stick to flipping burgers, then. Academia doesn't want you.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I'm only going to address the bolded part of this post, considering you have failed to string together any sensical sentences in the rest of it. (Also ignoring the fact that yet again you have failed to see the original point of my post, which was addressing your bizarre differentiation of "behavioural illness" and "mental illness" ).

    Returning to the bolded part of your post:
    Are you not aware that mental illness is far more prevalent in those existing within lower socio-economic backgrounds?

    But other than that, I refuse to have this debate with you if you're incapable of stringing complete sentences together.
    OK, by the by. Me and my mum refer to attitude and bad behaviour as behavioural. It's not a illness. It's a bad egg thing. Everyone knows one. You could be one even.

    Really... :rolleyes:

    It's 1.02am bed soon. No work tomorrow :woo:
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Please stick to flipping burgers, then. Academia doesn't want you.
    Aww... pity I probably kick your ass at Psychology with my 3 As in my AS Units with a overall A. First time round.

    I enjoy my job. Many people there are aiming for uni anyway.

    Please get a girlfriend. It's obvious you don't have one...
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    1) She doesn't have a mental illness. She's a attention seeker (I study psychology and have never heard of a money taking illness)
    'studying psychology' doesn't give you the authority to say 'she doesn't have a mental illness'- what a ridiculous thing to tell someone, as if you're 100% sure from the one paragraph you've read about someone. Christ.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    OK, by the by. Me and my mum refer to attitude and bad behaviour as behavioural. It's not a illness. It's a bad egg thing. Everyone knows one. You could be one even.
    But you are failing to adress that behaviour, or abnormal behaviour in this case, could potentially be a manifestation of a mental illness. To differentiate the two as you have in this thread makes no logical sense and just isn't helpful in any way.

    E.g. A young boy gets frustrated with his inability to communicate with his mother and he strikes out and hits her.

    This is a presentation of "bad behaviour" as you have put it. This is something you have seperated from any kind of pathology. Is this useful?...

    OH WAIT. The hypothetical boy mentioned above turns out to have down's syndrome, with his communication difficulties being a result of the condition. This is a result of a pathology. Is this still "bad behaviour" as you defined it, or is it because he has down's syndrome?

    As you can see, behaviour is potentially manifested as a result of underlying pathology. Therefore, it is not useful, logical or clarifying to seperate "behavioural problem" and "mental illness" as you have chosen to do in this thread.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Aww... pity I probably kick your ass at Psychology with my 3 As in my AS Units with a overall A. First time round.
    next you'll be quoting your year 9 SATS scores.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Aww... pity I probably kick your ass at Psychology with my 3 As in my AS Units with a overall A. First time round.
    I got near 100% in my Psych A-level.

    I am currently studying Psychology at university, and have thus far acheived a distinction (1st class) in every single module.



    However, I do not choose to pretend to be an expert as you do.
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    (Original post by missygeorgia)
    'studying psychology' doesn't give you the authority to say 'she doesn't have a mental illness'- what a ridiculous thing to tell someone, as if you're 100% sure from the one paragraph you've read about someone. Christ.
    The opposite is more accurate. It's my personal opinon. Psychology is for information. And for the last time... the GP doesn't think the mum is mental!
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Aww... pity I probably kick your ass at Psychology with my 3 As in my AS Units with a overall A. First time round.

    I enjoy my job. Many people there are aiming for uni anyway.

    Please get a girlfriend. It's obvious you don't have one...
    Hi there. :top:
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    The opposite is more accurate. It's my personal opinon. Psychology is for information. And for the last time... the GP doesn't think the mum is mental!
    The GP hasn't examined the mother, have they?

    In fact, I'd say anyone who hadn't examined the mother with some sort of medical degree had no right to comment on whether she had a mental illness or not.

    Please, dear God, take the anvil-sized hint there.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    The opposite is more accurate. It's my personal opinon. Psychology is for information. And for the last time... the GP doesn't think the mum is mental!
    You stated it as a fact, not as your personal opinion. And the GP probably doesn't know enough about the mum's psychological state to rashly come to a conclusion. (I don't think I even need to add 'unlike yourself'.)
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    But you are failing to adress that behaviour, or abnormal behaviour in this case, could potentially be a manifestation of a mental illness. To differentiate the two as you have in this thread makes no logical sense and just isn't helpful in any way.

    E.g. A young boy gets frustrated with his inability to communicate with his mother and he strikes out and hits her.

    This is a presentation of "bad behaviour" as you have put it. This is something you have seperated from any kind of pathology. Is this useful?...

    OH WAIT. The hypothetical boy mentioned above turns out to have down's syndrome, with his communication difficulties being a result of the condition. This is a result of a pathology. Is this still "bad behaviour" as you defined it, or is it because he has down's syndrome?

    As you can see, behaviour is potentially manifested as a result of underlying pathology. Therefore, it is not useful, logical or clarifying to seperate "behavioural problem" and "mental illness" as you have chosen to do in this thread.
    Look, there's a clear difference. And that is taken into account. And that's a learning disability n00b.

    My friend had a mum who HAD to ring about her pet which died. When she was out with my sister. If the mother really believed it and the doctor corrected her, then it's a mental illness. But the GP disregarded the daughters letter.

    They are many types of people in the world. For a obvious example which is parellel, why has Vanessa Hudgens taken naked pics of herself? It's logical not to be that stupid. But she did. It's makes not good sense to you and me but she did. For attention in this case. Therefore if the doctor didn't correct her and she has no medical history, there's a possibly she did it for attention and pity. She sleeps with random men? Is she looking for love?
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    (Original post by missygeorgia)
    You stated it as a fact, not as your personal opinion.
    Her circular logic is infuriating, isn't it?
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    your mum amuses me.
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    (Original post by Rosie18)
    Hi there. :top:
    Wow you exist lol

    (Now tell Godspeed Gehanna to leave me alone please, it's getting annoying)
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    (Original post by missygeorgia)
    You stated it as a fact, not as your personal opinion. And the GP probably doesn't know enough about the mum's psychological state to rashly come to a conclusion. (I don't think I even need to add 'unlike yourself'.)
    Fine. I think.

    Got many friends? Need to gang up on people?
 
 
 
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