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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    Edit: The BBC put the figure at 800,000 in an article where they were talking about the challenges facing school leavers. I'd done my sums based on the 8.2million the government say (dcsf.gov.uk) are in school in England. Cambridge statistics say 24,000 got AAA in 2006, only 1,000 of them took more than one of the 'soft' A-Levels the university had listed as less preferred.
    800,000 per year definitely sounds too high. The second sounds about right, if the 2001 census figures can be trusted.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    800,000 per year definitely sounds too high. The second sounds about right, if the 2001 census figures can be trusted.
    You reckon? You might be right- however, if its saying 3.7million in the 15-19 age bracket, then you'd be looking at roughly 1/5th of that number leaving school each year- so certainly over 700k.

    The point still is that, as a breakdown of your entire age group, AAA is in a very high band- it's certainly a hell of a lot more than 'ok'.
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    (Original post by NotGivingRealName)
    I heard a statistic that 1.9% of Oxbridge undergraduates are from the North... now, I don't know what the context of that stat was, and whether they considered North anything above Leeds or the outer Hebrides... but do you think there's any truth behind it?
    I'm pretty sure it's more than that, but there are precious few northerners about. We're in a decent minority anyway.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    800,000 per year definitely sounds too high. The second sounds about right, if the 2001 census figures can be trusted.
    The 800,000 is referring to the number of school leavers, not the number of AAA's. Only the second figure refers to that.
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    (Original post by Lifesharker)
    The 800,000 is referring to the number of school leavers, not the number of AAA's. Only the second figure refers to that.
    I assume he knew that, he was perhaps thinking 800k was too high a figure for school leavers in the UK. What we do know is: Over 24,000 AAAs in 2006, just over 10% of those that sat three or more A2 exams. 8.2million at school in England in total, 3.67million people aged 15 or over but 19 or under in the UK, and 95% of those people (by population) would have sat A-levels. Therefore, we'd be looking at a maximum of the top 3-4% of yeargroup in the the regions that sit A-Levels who would get AAA or better. Given that first class honours are now at around 1/8th of all degrees, so three times larger than AAA students, I'd say AAA at that stage in life isn't half bad- even if that doesn't mean you'll be able to kick up the required gears in order to take that to a high degree at the end.
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    Yes, I meant 800,000 is definitely too high for the number of school leavers in England and Wales.
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    (Original post by sulpicia)
    A few thoughts

    I was rejected by Cambridge a few months ago...and I'm rather disappointed I didn't get in. In fact I would have quite happily given everything I have for a place

    I did get an offer from a law department from another law department at another university.

    I would just like to make the point that going to Cambridge would have meant a lot to me.

    I'm not going to say

    'I didn't want to go there anyway'
    'Its too middle class'
    'Its full of snobs'
    'They aren't interested in comprehensive school types'
    'The university I'm going to has a similar academic reputation'

    because I know these arguments are untrue



    thanks

    sulpicia.
    Oxbridge is NOT middle class.

    It's UPPER class.

    If oxbridge and country houses are middle class, then what is upper class? the queen?
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    (Original post by sulpicia)
    A few thoughts

    I was rejected by Cambridge a few months ago...and I'm rather disappointed I didn't get in. In fact I would have quite happily given everything I have for a place

    I did get an offer from a law department from another law department at another university.

    I would just like to make the point that going to Cambridge would have meant a lot to me.

    I'm not going to say

    'I didn't want to go there anyway'
    'Its too middle class'
    'Its full of snobs'
    'They aren't interested in comprehensive school types'
    'The university I'm going to has a similar academic reputation'

    because I know these arguments are untrue



    thanks

    sulpicia.
    :console:

    I know how you feel. I'll probably feel like that if I got rejected from Cambridge - maybe even worse. :sad:

    This is hard because it's probably like talking to the rejected im so academic, but anyways, umm I would suggest postgraduate, maybe even a Master's - just to experience the Cambridge experience.

    But because you're doing Law you're probably want to do the Law course thing after the LLB (not too sure what it is).

    Umm, I don't know, I just honestly feel really sorry for you. It seemed you really wanted to get in - and I understand that. Hell, you say you are disappointed but to me you sound more devastated at the prospect of not going to Cambridge.

    If you want to PM me for a chat, feel free. I'd know how you feel, not because I was rejected but I've been thinking about this a lot and Cambridge probably meant the world to you.

    I'm not going to say "cheer up" or anything like that because tbh it's probably really hard to after being rejected.

    Really sorry to hear that and thanks for sharing your experience.

    :hugs:
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    (Original post by lm_wfc)
    Oxbridge is NOT middle class. It's UPPER class.
    Why?

    If oxbridge and country houses are middle class [...]
    Why do you associate Oxbridge with country houses? :confused:
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    (Original post by NotGivingRealName)
    I heard a statistic that 1.9% of Oxbridge undergraduates are from the North... now, I don't know what the context of that stat was, and whether they considered North anything above Leeds or the outer Hebrides... but do you think there's any truth behind it?
    I don't know how narrowly you can define "the North", but according to last year's admission statistics at Oxford (page 3), it ought to be a lot more than that - unless there isn't a single northerner at Cambridge, which I doubt...
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    (Original post by BJack)
    Why?



    Why do you associate Oxbridge with country houses? :confused:
    Why? 70% private school, usually private schools are for the very rich, therefore upper class.

    I was talking about the general attitude i see on here that people all think they're middle class. When we can't all be.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    I don't know how narrowly you can define "the North", but according to last year's admission statistics at Oxford (page 3), it ought to be a lot more than that - unless there isn't a single northerner at Cambridge, which I doubt...
    Assuming that NE/NW/Yorks/Scot/N.Ire are 'North', then thats over 16%- even if there was no one at Cambridge from here (which, lets face it, is ludicrous), that'd still make the overall rate about 8%. In other words, the stat is tosh.
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    (Original post by lm_wfc)
    Why? 70% private school, usually private schools are for the very rich, therefore upper class.

    I was talking about the general attitude i see on here that people all think they're middle class. When we can't all be
    I went to a private school and I'm middle class (possibly working class) :wavey:

    Unsurprisingly, the majority of people going to Oxbridge who were at private or public schools were on scholarships, and therefore could afford to go if the were middle/working class. I've not come across that many upper class people at Oxford, they're definitely not in a majority anyway.
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    (Original post by lm_wfc)
    Why? 70% private school,
    Go on; find a source for this figure.

    I was talking about the general attitude i see on here that people all think they're middle class. When we can't all be
    I'd imagine a large majority of TSR users are middle class. The working class is forever shrinking.
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    (Original post by lm_wfc)
    Why? 70% private school, usually private schools are for the very rich, therefore upper class.

    I was talking about the general attitude i see on here that people all think they're middle class. When we can't all be.
    Woops, nearly copied my post into yours.

    The overall average is about 45%- 47 at Oxford and 41 at Cambridge are privately educated, thats it. 'Middle Class' is defined (badly) by the social group people come from with respect to family earnings- therefore most at Oxford/Cambridge fall into this category- only around 1 in 9 are from working class backgrounds though. All that said, thats not a huge difference to anywhere else, most Russell Group Universities have over 20% privately educated and under 20% from working class social groups. That really isn't a huge difference, and even at that, this is making the assumption that people from these backgrounds don't interact or cannot get along with anyone outside their own social circles. That, of course, is a myth.
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Really? What course, what A Levels, what type of school?
    Course: History
    A-Levels: Biology, English Literature and History, with full marks in all my History exams and a moderately high A in the coursework.
    State school. My school is pretty awful at getting people with really high grades in for either English (has never happened) or History, or indeed any other humanity subject into Oxford. However, with things like Medicine or Physics it's surprisingly good... wonder why.
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    (Original post by belle_xx)
    Course: History
    A-Levels: Biology, English Literature and History, with full marks in all my History exams and a moderately high A in the coursework.
    State school. My school is pretty awful at getting people with really high grades in for either English (has never happened) or History, or indeed any other humanity subject into Oxford. However, with things like Medicine or Physics it's surprisingly good... wonder why.
    You should have got in theory. What was your personal reference like?... I know History is one the most popular courses at uni now... find it odd someone I know got a interview at Oxford for LAW with a AAB?! And you didn't get one. And she's reapplying next year, talk about getting someone's hopes up...

    Where are you going now?
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    I can't be bothered to quote all of you, but obviously not as many private school kids as i thought.
    But still, other universities are even less upper class, and so more middle class
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    Oh I say! Well if they aren't sexy then at least it's made up with their bank balance.
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    Assuming that NE/NW/Yorks/Scot/N.Ire are 'North', then thats over 16%- even if there was no one at Cambridge from here (which, lets face it, is ludicrous), that'd still make the overall rate about 8%. In other words, the stat is tosh.
    Nonetheless, 16% is still a very low figure.
 
 
 
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