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    Well, some people here have managed to do quite well in their Standard Grades, and I think I've done quite ok But, SG is now all said and done...and it's time for the big bad scary Higher Still subjetcs.

    So, since a lot of people have managed to do well in their Highers/Int 2s...what advice would you give us who are about to start them? What would you say is the best study method? Is there is anything you wish you had done through the year to make you more confident about sitting the exam/getting the results?

    And also, a big :hugs: to everyone about their results. And if you haven't done too well, I know it must be crap, but remember, there are always other options open for you :hugs:
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    Well I actually don't know but according to my results, I must know.

    I didn't revise any more than I did for my standard grades. I did however use more detailed notes. I would advise the aid of study guides (I can recommend a few if you want).

    I'm not sure if you get study periods at the college so if you don't I would allocate a set time each week to study a subject for half an hour. If you do get them make sure you use them! Yes, at first you won't take them seriously but around the time of the prelims, stop sneeking out of them, stop chatting in them and really work.

    In class, make detailed notes. This makes it so much easier when you come back to them and summarise - and do do this because I never used to do it and found it helped a lot when I started.

    Lastly, don't take it too seriously. Stay motivated but remember you're ment to enjoy yourself as a teenager and education isn't the be all and end all. Go out at night. Go out at weekends. I did and I'm pretty happy with my results :teeth:
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    i would say the key to success is just working hard throughout the year. most people can get away with doing absolutely bugger all at standard grade then cramming at the end and coming out with a credit pass.

    i would also recommend getting past papers for the sciences. they recycle a silly amount of multiple choice chemistry questions.
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    Snap out of it the moment you think "Ahh, I have a whole x amount of months left, I'll study all this later on". I had no one to tell me this and I spent pretty much the whole year thinking it to some degree.

    Ahh, I have a whole 2 weeks left until English, I'll study all this later on... :awesome:

    So put a pinch on the laziness and it's smooth sailing really. If you're motivated it'll work -- if you're not you'll get kicked out of class. :] I was very nearly chucked out of English many, many times for being such a lazy-arse. Although I did get an A in the end (well, yesterday) and I was absolutely beaming at the thought of my teacher's face when she saw that. She genuinely disliked me and tried to trip me up every step of the way; so that's a nice verbal kick in the teeth for her.

    Okay, I can't post anything without rambling. Fufufu. My advice is simply stay motivated and don't get lazy or complacement. Kick yourself when you feel that happening. It seems like fairly self-evident guidance but in my experience (of both myself and other people) it is very easy to fall into bad habits.
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    Well, I would definetly recommend studying a little bit during the Christmas holidays. Maybe not too much, otherwise you'll probably feel overworked and start resenting your courses.
    Personally I didn't have much of a revision plan (actually for Higher Bio I read the textbook over the two days before the exam). But I know now that that wasn't the right attitude. I still got away with it (got AAAAA in my 5th year) but the hard work pays off. It's good to have worked consistently hard throughout the year so that you're in a position where you aren't cramming the night before (I used to do that most of the time).
    The good thing about 5th year is that teachers will generally push you quite a bit and give you lots of work to be getting on with. 6th year was difficult because it was largely up to yourself to do the required work, no-one was spoon feeding you anything.
    Hmm, I think that's all I can say for now.
    Apart from, try to enjoy yourself! 5th year was surprisingly good fun - well, it seems that way compared to 6th year. That's just because of my own circumstances though, 6th year is usually good fun as well (but I had interviews/extra curriculars which were putting the pressure on).
    Good luck!
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    Ask when you don't understand something, even if it appears to be a tiny insignificant detail.

    Work regularly throughout the year, rather than studying non-stop right before the exams.

    Aim higher, still. Believe in yourself.
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    Thanks all :teeth: I'll be doing 4 Highers and an Int 2, fun fun fun. At least we get a designated UCAS period :awesome:
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    I'd agree with what everyone has added so far.

    I dunno how much this applies to other subjects, but I definitely found in Maths and Physics that if I understood a concept, I could apply it much more efficiently than had I simply rote learned it. For example, in Unit 1 of Physics you have to study gases and this involves pressures, volumes and temperatures. Instead of just memorising the explanations for why pressure increases in a close container (i.e. fixed volume) provided the temperature increases, I found it much much easier to think through the whole process - particles have more kinetic energy --> larger velocity --> larger exchange of momentum with container (in this case, you might actually need to explain this process in a similar fashion in the exam).

    I appreciate that trying to understand concepts might not be possible if you consider the short time available to get through a Higher course. It also might just be very difficult (and not worth your time) in the case of certain topics i.e. I doubt you could "understand" the radioactivity section near the end of the Higher - it's not exactly obvious that a neutron can decay to become a proton + electron.


    Good luck to anyone who is about to begin Highers
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    For english - Study till you feel like killing yourself for 3 weeks and you will get an A lol
    Well I revised 4-5 hours everynight :P
    For modern studies - cram like a ***** the week before - considering I knew nothing - and I came out with a B
    For Biology - YOU WILL NEVER GET AN A, lol for some reason I'm awesome at biology but never seem to pass the 'B' limit
    For music- Do easy instruments,take technology if it is available, learn concepts
    i did none of that and resulted in a C
    For rmps - I have no idea what I do but I get a's so yeah lol
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    (Original post by CallumFR)
    I'd agree with what everyone has added so far.

    I dunno how much this applies to other subjects, but I definitely found in Maths and Physics that if I understood a concept, I could apply it much more efficiently than had I simply rote learned it. For example, in Unit 1 of Physics you have to study gases and this involves pressures, volumes and temperatures. Instead of just memorising the explanations for why pressure increases in a close container (i.e. fixed volume) provided the temperature increases, I found it much much easier to think through the whole process - particles have more kinetic energy --> larger velocity --> larger exchange of momentum with container (in this case, you might actually need to explain this process in a similar fashion in the exam).

    I appreciate that trying to understand concepts might not be possible if you consider the short time available to get through a Higher course. It also might just be very difficult (and not worth your time) in the case of certain topics i.e. I doubt you could "understand" the radioactivity section near the end of the Higher - it's not exactly obvious that a neutron can decay to become a proton + electron.


    Good luck to anyone who is about to begin Highers

    I echo all of this!

    The key is to revise efficiently. Don't go over stuff you already know if there's stuff you don't know in any other subject, use your time in class well and keep up with understanding stuff.

    It's not really all that much work if you keep up, and spread it over the year
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    Past papers till you wanna burn them.

    Best way to drum it all in!
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    Oh and this whole list makes it sound easy

    I did all the above and still didn't do amazingly

    Remember that everyone learns differently and that like me you won't ever achieve all straight A's sometimes

    It sucks but there is more to life than highers lol
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    (Original post by claireeex)
    Past papers till you wanna burn them.

    Best way to drum it all in!
    These word right here, they are the words to listen to.
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    The best tip that I can give is to do LOTS (and I mean lots) of past paper practice about a week before your exam.

    You can know absolutely everything in the course inside out, but if you can't apply it effectively in exam conditions then it's all worthless.

    Get your hands on the latest set of past papers, and also try to get some of the older ones as well. Hope this helps.
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    Yeah, past papers are essential too, forgot about that!
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    Yep, I think you've all pretty much branded 'PAST FECKIN PAPERS MKAY?' on my brain :p: Thanks for the tips guys. I wonder if the lovely people at the SQA would print me off a nice copy of the course arrangments and send them too me...:love:
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    another tip may be to try and purchase past papers from a couple of years back as you can download the last 2/3 years off the internet for free.
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    (Original post by LuhLah)
    Yep, I think you've all pretty much branded 'PAST FECKIN PAPERS MKAY?' on my brain :p: Thanks for the tips guys. I wonder if the lovely people at the SQA would print me off a nice copy of the course arrangments and send them too me...:love:

    SQA Website -> Services for Learners -> Choose the subject from the dropdown menu on the left hand side -> Click on arrangement documents on the menu on the right hand side -> choose the relevant level

    et voilà.
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    Yup, I know you can get them on the site, but I always work better with paper. I don't know why, but I just do :ninja:
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    we've already started higher maths and biology and english since our teachers think one year isnt enough............stupid teachers making us work! -.-
 
 
 
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