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    Hi
    what i'd really like to know...and i know you'll say its so diverse, i can't get a definitive answer on this, but what does a typical day of work in ot involve?
    i find info on ot can be really vague, is it really just assessing service users for their needs and organising the modifications they require? liaising with therapy providers maybe? but what does an OT actually do for the patient themselves?
    i'm interested mostly in disability and in palliative care, like working closely with the 'patients' themselves, juggling a busy workload, my background is in administration and i loved being rushed off my feet in the office, juggling fifty tasks and getting there in the end but i'm beginning to think i dont want to be stuck in an office at all. Is that what OT would involve? or is it more hands-on?
    info much appreciated.
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    (Original post by schmee)
    Hi
    what i'd really like to know...and i know you'll say its so diverse, i can't get a definitive answer on this, but what does a typical day of work in ot involve?
    i find info on ot can be really vague, is it really just assessing service users for their needs and organising the modifications they require? liaising with therapy providers maybe? but what does an OT actually do for the patient themselves?
    i'm interested mostly in disability and in palliative care, like working closely with the 'patients' themselves, juggling a busy workload, my background is in administration and i loved being rushed off my feet in the office, juggling fifty tasks and getting there in the end but i'm beginning to think i dont want to be stuck in an office at all. Is that what OT would involve? or is it more hands-on?
    info much appreciated.
    I think you're right in that it's so diverse you won't get a definitive answer. I've never really been able to understand what an OT does, however I can tell you 2 examples that I've seen on placement.... in older adult care, the OT would take the patients into her special OT kitchen and watch them doing a task such as making a ready meal, cooking and preparing food, and assess how well they do this and whether they are ready to function at home on discharge or whether they need some kind of help. Her job involved doing lots of assessments, like falls assessments, and going to patient's homes to assess their living situation in relation to their health and mobility. So for instance do they need hand rails for the stairs? Do they need aids for getting into the bath?

    In an adults of working age ward environment, the OT is on the ward most of the day and runs groups for much of it. Things like arts and crafts, promoting health and wellbeing, trips out. Basically just getting people up and doing things. She will also work one on one and take patient's home for a few hours or out shopping - basically the therapeutic stuff that the nurses struggle to find time for.
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    The first couple of examples have more complex thinking behind them, but are 'bread and butter' in certain physical (and increasingly older MH) environments, and tend to be how people perceive us.

    Group work is not about 'getting people up and doing things'...definitely not if it's therapeutic group work.

    If you want to find out more I suggest reading:

    http://www.cot.co.uk/Homepage/About_...apy_explained/ ( and the other pages below the header).

    I know the NHS jobs description sounds broad, http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/details...lt.aspx?Id=284 , but you can do amazing things with patients.

    On (for example) both my MH placements, I had a lot more purposeful contact with patients than the nursing students - OT is all about purposeful, meaningful activity from the point of the patient/service user/client.
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    (Original post by schmee)
    Hi
    what i'd really like to know...and i know you'll say its so diverse, i can't get a definitive answer on this, but what does a typical day of work in ot involve?
    i find info on ot can be really vague, is it really just assessing service users for their needs and organising the modifications they require? liaising with therapy providers maybe? but what does an OT actually do for the patient themselves?
    i'm interested mostly in disability and in palliative care, like working closely with the 'patients' themselves, juggling a busy workload, my background is in administration and i loved being rushed off my feet in the office, juggling fifty tasks and getting there in the end but i'm beginning to think i dont want to be stuck in an office at all. Is that what OT would involve? or is it more hands-on?
    info much appreciated.
    I have done OT work experience and applied to OT originally. Eldery in hospitals is routine; get personal details of patient and house, do sponge baths, get them a cane, sort out their wheelchair. Check hand for stoke. It's more mundane. A and E is the smaller version of this.

    Neuroscience (best place tbh): Hand therapy! Games, e.t.c.

    Learning disablity children (most varied): find the child the right spoon, game for child's hand, touch-feely thing for blind child, exercise to make a cerebel pansy child look like their flying

    I feel the same about the office. A nurse's workload would be more hectic. But OTs are always busy doing something.

    Biggest difference in OT and nursing. One deals with blood and meds, one does a vary of things. Nursing does more baths though.

    HOWEVER: Nursing: nearly 100% employment, OT 60% employment (off www.unistats.com) =/
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    I think you're right in that it's so diverse you won't get a definitive answer. I've never really been able to understand what an OT does, however I can tell you 2 examples that I've seen on placement.... in older adult care, the OT would take the patients into her special OT kitchen and watch them doing a task such as making a ready meal, cooking and preparing food, and assess how well they do this and whether they are ready to function at home on discharge or whether they need some kind of help. Her job involved doing lots of assessments, like falls assessments, and going to patient's homes to assess their living situation in relation to their health and mobility. So for instance do they need hand rails for the stairs? Do they need aids for getting into the bath?

    In an adults of working age ward environment, the OT is on the ward most of the day and runs groups for much of it. Things like arts and crafts, promoting health and wellbeing, trips out. Basically just getting people up and doing things. She will also work one on one and take patient's home for a few hours or out shopping - basically the therapeutic stuff that the nurses struggle to find time for.
    Oh yeah, OTs love the kitchen stuff :p:
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    (Original post by schmee)
    Hi
    what i'd really like to know...and i know you'll say its so diverse, i can't get a definitive answer on this, but what does a typical day of work in ot involve?
    i find info on ot can be really vague, is it really just assessing service users for their needs and organising the modifications they require? liaising with therapy providers maybe? but what does an OT actually do for the patient themselves?
    i'm interested mostly in disability and in palliative care, like working closely with the 'patients' themselves, juggling a busy workload, my background is in administration and i loved being rushed off my feet in the office, juggling fifty tasks and getting there in the end but i'm beginning to think i dont want to be stuck in an office at all. Is that what OT would involve? or is it more hands-on?
    info much appreciated.
    Advice: get a weeks work experience in OT and a weeks experience in nursing at your local hospital to make up your mind about what you want to do Summer is a good time...
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    I have done OT work experience and applied to OT originally. Eldery in hospitals is routine; get personal details of patient and house, do sponge baths, get them a cane, sort out their wheelchair. Check hand for stoke. It's more mundane. A and E is the smaller version of this.

    Neuroscience (best place tbh): Hand therapy! Games, e.t.c.

    Learning disablity children (most varied): find the child the right spoon, game for child's hand, touch-feely thing for blind child, exercise to make a cerebel pansy child look like their flying

    I feel the same about the office. A nurse's workload would be more hectic. But OTs are always busy doing something.

    Biggest difference in OT and nursing. One deals with blood and meds, one does a vary of things. Nursing does more baths though.

    HOWEVER: Nursing: nearly 100% employment, OT 60% employment (off www.unistats.com) =/
    Not strictly true. Both occupations do a variety of things. Nursing isn't just 'blood and meds'.
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    Not strictly true. Both occupations do a variety of things. Nursing isn't just 'blood and meds'.
    Oh ok. But I've never seen a OT give out meds and takes bloods That's the reason I thought of OT. It's a big deal if you hate blood...
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    (Original post by emmie19)
    Oh ok. But I've never seen a OT give out meds and takes bloods That's the reason I thought of OT. It's a big deal if you hate blood...
    So what you meant was OTs don't do blood and meds. Fair enough
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    Something that might be worth considering. I have a friend who is looking to start OT next year at uni. She did a weeks work placement, and was told by the guy there that whilst the degree was interesting, he couldn't guarantee that she would get any work on the other side. There is big change going on at the moment within the NHS, and it looks like job cuts are on the way. With physiotherapy for instance, they seem to be trying to take the physio away from hands on patient interaction, and are using lower paid assistants for that. The phsyio therefore is the consultant and passes on the work to the band 3 guys and girls, therefore presumably meaning you need fewer physios. He was of the opinion apparantly that the work an OT does would be gradually phased out over the coming years. Don't know if anyone can confirm or deny this for you.
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    Down-skilling is an issue for all of the professions.

    My year were the hardest hit by the most recent freezes, from what I understand it's picking up again (and physios were hit harder than OTs by a long way).

    I think it depends what type of OT you're looking at in terms of whether your work will change dramatically (much the same way as physio).
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    I think there's some of what Mike says, although in my short experience that could often be a blessing as the assistants were used for walking practice once the patient had reached a certain stage. That meant that the physio could concentrate on assessing new patients, analysing their problems and devising the rehab programme. I did hear talk also of physios taking over some of the OT work, as in many ways it's closely related. I'd agree with the stuff above about what an OT does, although on my community placement the physios did some of that and the OTs did some physio type stuff, and we worked closely together.

    A lot of OT is enabling the patient to do activities of daily living, which includes kitchen tasks but also using the bath etc, posibly with special adaptations like a bath chair. Hand function can also obviously be useful for many tasks, such as writing, and they may work with a speech and language therapist on this (there can be quite a lot of neuro involved). I saw several patients where all three areas worked together to help get the best outcome for the patient
 
 
 
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