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    Hey, I'm starting my psychology degree this September. I was wondering if anyone who has done their first year already could give me some ideas as to what I should expect i.e what lessons you took, what you enjoyed/disliked most about it.

    Any info would be great, I'm really excited about starting and just want to know more about the course so I'm happy to hear anything.
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    (Original post by flynny1818)
    Hey, I'm starting my psychology degree this September. I was wondering if anyone who has done their first year already could give me some ideas as to what I should expect i.e what lessons you took, what you enjoyed/disliked most about it.

    Any info would be great, I'm really excited about starting and just want to know more about the course so I'm happy to hear anything.
    me too! :awesome:
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    Study a lot. :p:

    And maybe I'll take Psychology next year or Audiology... who knows?
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    (Original post by flynny1818)
    Hey, I'm starting my psychology degree this September. I was wondering if anyone who has done their first year already could give me some ideas as to what I should expect i.e what lessons you took, what you enjoyed/disliked most about it.

    Any info would be great, I'm really excited about starting and just want to know more about the course so I'm happy to hear anything.
    To be honest, there isn't much advice to give. It's pretty straight forward.

    Perhaps brush up on your maths skills if you're a little rusty; there is a lot of stats involved. Oh and KEEP UP WITH THE RECOMMENDED READING. It sucks to have to try and read tons of books a few weeks before exams.

    Oh and if you're planning on making your university time worth while, get some work experience while you study. Volunteering is a great way to do this. Get ahead while you can.
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    Psychology is extremely competitive - if you want to get into postgrad courses or the clinical doctorate you need to 1) study like a maniac and 2) get some work experience under your belt asap. Do all your required reading and go to the lectures.
    Basically you need to study study study. I'm going into third year of my four year course and I really need to pull my socks up. I have no psychology related experience but I'm hoping to go into teaching so I'm focusing on experience for that at the moment.
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    ...seriously? work work work in first year? Personally I heard the words "first year doesn't count towards your degree" and started aiming for a healthy 41%.

    First year of uni is as much about adjusting to the new lifestyle and freedom as it is about actually studying. I would say, make sure you're keeping up with work, but mostly so that you still learn enough to go on into second year without being left behind, cos that's when you actually have to start working a lot. I did no extra reading till second year and in truth first year exams are pretty easy at most uni's.

    Go and enjoy yourself in first year, make friends, try new things and go new places, you'll never have those opportunities again! But, make sure you turn up for as many lectures as you can, you'd be amazed just how much information you absorb even when you're half asleep, with a hangover that feels like bubonic plauge.
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    ...seriously? work work work in first year? Personally I heard the words "first year doesn't count towards your degree" and started aiming for a healthy 41%.
    No offense, but I can't stand the whole "Oh the first year doesn't count, I'll just get 40-50%" mentality. It makes university just completely trivial.

    If I were an employer and I had a group of candidates to choose from, one of the things I'd ask to see would be their transcript, in particular their first year result. If they barely scraped a pass, it lets you know that you have an applicant who is aversive to working hard and would potentially slack off while your back was turned. It would put me right off and I'd probably hand the job to someone who worked consistantly through out their degree.

    We're very lucky to have higher education so open to us. It seems silly to waste it by barely scraping a pass, especially when you're forking out £20,000+ of your future earnings to do so.

    OP, work hard and mop the floor with the other undergraduates. You'll thank yourself on your graduation day.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    No offense, but I can't stand the whole "Oh the first year doesn't count, I'll just get 40-50%" mentality. It makes university just completely trivial.

    If I were an employer and I had a group of candidates to choose from, one of the things I'd ask to see would be their transcript, in particular their first year result. If they barely scraped a pass, it lets you know that you have an applicant who is aversive to working hard and would potentially slack off while your back was turned. It would put me right off and I'd probably hand the job to someone who worked consistantly through out their degree.

    We're very lucky to have higher education so open to us. It seems silly to waste it by barely scraping a pass, especially when you're forking out £20,000+ of your future earnings to do so.

    OP, work hard and mop the floor with the other undergraduates. You'll thank yourself on your graduation day.

    I am more of the opinion that grades and essays are only a part of what uni does for you. A proportion of our tuition fees is quite rightly spent on providing all the clubs and societies that offer you new and interesting experiences, allowing you to become a more rounded person. It scares me to think of all the people that graduate from Oxbridge with firsts but have no idea how to cook a meal or pay the gas bill and have no life outside of academic work.

    In truth, if I was an employer I would probably also want to ask for someone's transcript, but no one does and good wordly nous is just as important, if not more so.
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    Hey, thanks for the advice. I agree with both of you on this one, I know the first year is as much about gaining life experience and meeting new people for most new students.

    However I am 25 and feel that the whole partying and trying new things part has been done and after finishing my first year doing an access course i just really want to get my head down and study........how boring! I am looking forward to meeting new people though so wont be a complete anti social geek.
    I also have heard that when it comes to assessing your final grades if you are teetering on the border of a first your tutors will look to your first year results. I dont know how true this is?
    The maths and statisics advice has been appreciated, I have heard this before and i'm now trying to scrub up on these! Any other little tit bits would be great, cheers
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    (Original post by flynny1818)
    Hey, thanks for the advice. I agree with both of you on this one, I know the first year is as much about gaining life experience and meeting new people for most new students.

    However I am 25 and feel that the whole partying and trying new things part has been done and after finishing my first year doing an access course i just really want to get my head down and study........how boring! I am looking forward to meeting new people though so wont be a complete anti social geek.
    I also have heard that when it comes to assessing your final grades if you are teetering on the border of a first your tutors will look to your first year results. I dont know how true this is?
    The maths and statisics advice has been appreciated, I have heard this before and i'm now trying to scrub up on these! Any other little tit bits would be great, cheers
    Hello, I will be going into the 3rd year of my degree and as I began my Psychology with Neuroscience degree at the age of 24, so I was once where you were!

    I would say try to cultivate an interest in psychology at this stage. Find an A' Level psychology textbook such as :

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1...age&q=&f=false

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=q...age&q=&f=false

    Books like these provide a really nice concise introduction to many of the modules covered on a psychology degree in the first year. If you feel overwhelmed by a topic taught, have a flick through one of these books and you will often find the topic will have been broken down very well.

    In terms of learning more about statistics, you could have a quick read through these websites to see the type of things covered. They cover both first year and second year statistics, so please try not to feel anxious about this part of the course. I found it look a lot of hard work to write reports and understand which statistics to use, but with practice and lots of reading, it became much more accessible.

    http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/contents.php

    http://www.statisticshell.com/statlist.html


    If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    ...seriously? work work work in first year? Personally I heard the words "first year doesn't count towards your degree" and started aiming for a healthy 41%.

    First year of uni is as much about adjusting to the new lifestyle and freedom as it is about actually studying. I would say, make sure you're keeping up with work, but mostly so that you still learn enough to go on into second year without being left behind, cos that's when you actually have to start working a lot. I did no extra reading till second year and in truth first year exams are pretty easy at most uni's.

    Go and enjoy yourself in first year, make friends, try new things and go new places, you'll never have those opportunities again! But, make sure you turn up for as many lectures as you can, you'd be amazed just how much information you absorb even when you're half asleep, with a hangover that feels like bubonic plauge.
    A small part of the first year is worth the final grade now.
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    If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask[/QUOTE]

    Thank you so much! Thats exactly the sort of advice I was after, will have a look into getting some of the recommended books. I will most likely be asking more questions soon!

    Good luck for your third year, hope all goes well, K
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    Hi everyone, i'm in the same position as the OP however i am in particular worried about the statistics side. I have done Psychology A Level so have an idea of basic tests of correlation (Spearman's Rho, Mann-Whitney, Standerd Dev. etc.) and such, but in truth I struggle with maths and only acheived a B at GCSE. Would I need any extra maths or stats tuition in order to keep up? :/
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    (Original post by NiceWeatherForAirstrikes)
    Hi everyone, i'm in the same position as the OP however i am in particular worried about the statistics side. I have done Psychology A Level so have an idea of basic tests of correlation (Spearman's Rho, Mann-Whitney, Standerd Dev. etc.) and such, but in truth I struggle with maths and only acheived a B at GCSE. Would I need any extra maths or stats tuition in order to keep up? :/
    To be honest, they'll start you from scratch. As long as you know BODMAS (or PEDMAS, whatever you want to call it) you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    To be honest, they'll start you from scratch. As long as you know BODMAS (or PEDMAS, whatever you want to call it) you'll be fine.
    Thankyou. Just out of interest, (and i'm assuming here that you did the A Level), was the first term boring because it was essentially going over stuff you'd already covered but in more detail? I realise that the lectures also have to be pitched at people that have never done Psychology before so i was just wondering how that all worked out.

    Erm..I know BIDMAS? Brackets Indicies Division Multiplication Addition Subtraction?! God this is going back...
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    (Original post by NiceWeatherForAirstrikes)
    Thankyou. Just out of interest, (and i'm assuming here that you did the A Level), was the first term boring because it was essentially going over stuff you'd already covered but in more detail? I realise that the lectures also have to be pitched at people that have never done Psychology before so i was just wondering how that all worked out.

    Erm..I know BIDMAS? Brackets Indicies Division Multiplication Addition Subtraction?! God this is going back...
    The first year was boring..

    They don't neccisarily go over a-level again. Psych is such a big area of study that they can choose not to. However, they generally assume that you have an a-level knowledge of Psychology and there is a lot of name/study dropping with an expectation that you understand what they mean.

    And yep, BIDMAS is fine. That's all you need really. You might not even do it by hand at your uni and they might just start with SPSS, the statistics software.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    The first year was boring..

    They don't neccisarily go over a-level again. Psych is such a big area of study that they can choose not to. However, they generally assume that you have an a-level knowledge of Psychology and there is a lot of name/study dropping with an expectation that you understand what they mean.
    And yep, BIDMAS is fine. That's all you need really. You might not even do it by hand at your uni and they might just start with SPSS, the statistics software.
    How do the people who haven't done it for A Level manage then? Because surely if you screamed BANDURA at them it wouldn't ring any bells?
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    (Original post by NiceWeatherForAirstrikes)
    How do the people who haven't done it for A Level manage then? Because surely if you screamed BANDURA at them it wouldn't ring any bells?
    Well, last year one of our tutors asked how many did A-level, and about 99.9% of the theatre raised their hands.

    If someone hasn't done it at a-level, they should be expecting to have a lot of catch-up to do.
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    (Original post by NiceWeatherForAirstrikes)
    Thankyou. Just out of interest, (and i'm assuming here that you did the A Level), was the first term boring because it was essentially going over stuff you'd already covered but in more detail? I realise that the lectures also have to be pitched at people that have never done Psychology before so i was just wondering how that all worked out.

    Erm..I know BIDMAS? Brackets Indicies Division Multiplication Addition Subtraction?! God this is going back...

    I've just graduated having done psychology and for me, alot of the first year was a bit repetitive of A-level but it did go into more detail, which can be quite interesting at times. However, we had quite a few people who hadn't done the course at A-level, one of my best friends from uni actually hadn't, and she did struggle more than me, but that maybe because I always seemed to find psychology/science-type stuff easier to understand than she did, including stuff I hadn't learnt at A-level ...
    But I think how much it repeats A-level stuff might depend on exactly what you did at A-level and the particular uni you go to, cos I very much doubt its exactly the same everywhere. And there was still alot of 1st year stuff that wasn't covered at A-level

    As for the maths/stats side, I also got a B at GCSE, and still have no idea how I even got that cos I'm actually quite bad at maths lol. I found the stats side a bit of a struggle, but we used SPSS, and when I finally figured out how to work that it wasn't so bad. Although I always had a bit of trouble working out what all the numbers meant, but I have a feeling that's more because I didn't work it all out myself, SPSS did it for me, so cos I didn't understand how I got the numbers, I found it harder to understand what they meant. Although my boyfriend had to resubmit a report as it was missing some stats and couldn't get access to SPSS so we worked out how to do all the necessary stats by hand and I found it alot easier to understand after that, so maybe if you know how the numbers came about you may find it a little easier to understand ........... unless that's just me being weird lol
    If you find a good stats book though you should be fine.

    Sorry for the essay lol. Hope it helps a little =]
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    (Original post by *CaptainHerb!!*)
    I've just graduated having done psychology and for me, alot of the first year was a bit repetitive of A-level but it did go into more detail, which can be quite interesting at times. However, we had quite a few people who hadn't done the course at A-level, one of my best friends from uni actually hadn't, and she did struggle more than me, but that maybe because I always seemed to find psychology/science-type stuff easier to understand than she did, including stuff I hadn't learnt at A-level ...
    But I think how much it repeats A-level stuff might depend on exactly what you did at A-level and the particular uni you go to, cos I very much doubt its exactly the same everywhere. And there was still alot of 1st year stuff that wasn't covered at A-level

    As for the maths/stats side, I also got a B at GCSE, and still have no idea how I even got that cos I'm actually quite bad at maths lol. I found the stats side a bit of a struggle, but we used SPSS, and when I finally figured out how to work that it wasn't so bad. Although I always had a bit of trouble working out what all the numbers meant, but I have a feeling that's more because I didn't work it all out myself, SPSS did it for me, so cos I didn't understand how I got the numbers, I found it harder to understand what they meant. Although my boyfriend had to resubmit a report as it was missing some stats and couldn't get access to SPSS so we worked out how to do all the necessary stats by hand and I found it alot easier to understand after that, so maybe if you know how the numbers came about you may find it a little easier to understand ........... unless that's just me being weird lol
    If you find a good stats book though you should be fine.

    Sorry for the essay lol. Hope it helps a little =]
    Thanks loads for all your advice If it's any help I did AQA A (old spec) Psychology A Level, I don't know which you did and whether some of the boards spec's are different/more similar to the first year.

    As for stats, forgive me for being a complete tard but i haven't the foggiest what 'SPSS' is is it some kinda of software that works out the stats for you? But thanks anyway!
 
 
 
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