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Do you use a timetable to study? Or don't you even plan?? watch

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    Do any of you actually make their own timetable to sudy and have a very systematic process of going on about it? I have tried this recently and it just doesn't seem to work for me. For instance, I might have planned to spend half an hour on a topic but all these difficulties crop up when I don't expect them so I just have to spend more time reasoning the matter out! Trouble is that when I do take the time I need to master an entire concept well I'd be totally fed up of studying so I wouldn't want to see the book again anytime soon.:eek3:

    Anyway, this is kind of bothering me a lot cause now I don't have a guide to follow in order to study. Trouble is though, last time I heard someome say how their brother (whose got some exams coming up soon) is driving them nuts cause every available minute he has he just grabs the nearest book and studies like a maniac apparantly!! (and that is soo not me!!... so i was like:eek: )

    So..i dunno what I should do really? Do you think this guy's approach is the best cause he's making the most of his time? Or is it better if i plan things out, albeit not rly following the plan? :confused:
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    If I need to work I usually decide what I want get done in each day and don't go to bed before it's done. May not be the best idea but it works for me, rather than having a set timetable...
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    Dont usually....
    i normally just set out what i need to get done that night and dont stop till ive done it, normally because some stuff that i planned would take ageees didnt take as long, and some of the stuff id be able to flick through took quite a while. seemed to work ok. soon find out on the 20th.
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    I made a timetable as a way of evading doing any actual revision
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    I do that sometimes, but, as I've yet to get to a level of difficulty that is actually hard to master and goes beyond simple memorisation, then I haven't experienced the problems you've had
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    I make timetables, and then never stick to them, because something always comes up that is more important.
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    No. Do people really do that? :shock:
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    I'm the same: they've been trying to get me to do "revision timetables" since First Year, but I've never bothered. As far as AS exams this year have gone, I had a little time before each exam (around 40-30 mins) and I did my revision then, except History of Art, which worried me a bit, when I started the night before. Admittedly, cut it a little fine for my 2nd Politics exam (10 mins before) but that was only because I went to Subway for my lunch instead. :awesome:

    I know people, however, who do the whole organising, starting 3 months before sort of thing for revision, and I'm always amazed that they're able to do it. I don't see the point as I know I wouldn't remember anything from that far in advance. Plus, I have a short attention span when not under pressure. But, you know, I've gotten good grades out of my methods (or lack of them), so I wouldn't worry if that approach didn't really fit for you.
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    I've tried making revision timetables too and I agree that they're difficult to stick to... but in my case, I think it's because I'm a bit of a perfectionist and so most of my set 'tasks' overrun, as I spend more time on them than I intended to!
    I think it's good to have a general idea of where the revision's going though, but not too detailed a plan, as it will take up too much time to construct.
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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    I do that sometimes, but, as I've yet to get to a level of difficulty that is actually hard to master and goes beyond simple memorisation, then I haven't experienced the problems you've had
    This.
    I expect A Levels need a bit more thought and GCSEs are all about having a good memory so no experience yet.
    I don't expect I'll be like the guy you mentioned though, I kind of read a bit, do a bit of revision then think "Oh, I'll be fine now". Then I have a bit of realisation the night before and do a couple of hours. Distractions shouldn't be so distracting!
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    (Original post by vander Beth)
    No. Do people really do that? :shock:
    The studying every available minute thing? Well, it's what his sister said, and I believe that cause he knows his subjects on the tip of his fingers but always looks like he's about to have a panic attack... :o: :yes:
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    I used a revision timetable and it worked quite well for me. I'd say if you don't find it an effective way to study then just do what suits you best, maybe devote a whole day to one topic/subject or something.
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    Timetables for study don't work for me. I usually only plan out what I want to get done for the day, and then stick to that. I'm not very good at sticking to weekly timetables lol.
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    I think it's important to have some sort of plan - whether it be exact timetables or just a rough plan of what you want to have finished each day or what topic to tackle each day. That way you worry less at the end cos you have too little time to finish what you want when the pressure sets in. It's like a money budget to me - it's a good idea to have a rough idea what you should be spending each week so you don't run out of money at the end of the month .

    I don't always stick to it. I must admit. And you do end up feeling really disappointed in yourself but I find it does help. You do have to set realistic plans and targets though or else you'll drastically miss and do less than you could do
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    I make one, then don't follow it, then get stressed because i'm not follwing it and think i'll fail, so make another... etc.
    next year i'm just not gonna bother.
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    When I'm in exam-mode, I have a plan that I roughly stick to. This means that I have written each day which 3 subjects I will revise for. This usually happens around easter time, then, as soon as the exams are a couple of days away, I usually just switch to revising whatever.

    I know some people like really specific timetables though - with modules and everything.
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    Nope. I have very low motivation and thus can't actually make myself do any work till about 3 days before an exam or the night or two before an assignment is due in. It frustrates the hell out of me but I honestly can't stop it.

    It's worked out okay so far, I guess.
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    I always make a timetable but never actually use it. Timetables never work! At least not for me...
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    If I do make a plan or a timetable I make it a lot looser than half an hour time slots. For example if I have a whole two days to study and four subjects or topics to study I'll just allocate one morning or one afternoon for each. That way you have a whole morning to decide what's most important to study and if any problems crop up it's not like you only have 30 minutes to solve them.
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    I didn't plan my gcses

    I wrote and (mostly) stuck to my AS level timetable though...
 
 
 
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