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I found the first year of my LLB almost unbearably dry and boring. Anyone else? Watch

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    It really wasn't what I expected at all.
    And now I'm seriously rethinking my vague ambition to become a barrister.
    I'm not sure I would find a legal career stimulating or satisfying, or whether it would even be achievable for me.

    Did anyoen else feel like this after their first year of Uni? Or did you all coast along effortlessly?
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    (Original post by brightxburns)
    It really wasn't what I expected at all.
    And now I'm seriously rethinking my vague ambition to become a barrister.
    I'm not sure I would find a legal career stimulating or satisfying, or whether it would even be achievable for me.

    Did anyoen else feel like this after their first year of Uni? Or did you all coast along effortlessly?
    Which uni do you attend?

    Have you thought this through? i.e. is your course unbearably boring or perhaps did you set the bar too high for your expectations?

    Aside from the course, how do you find the whole uni experience? perhaps if you dislike the uni and colleagues then this negative experience is having an effect and relaying onto your opinions of your course?
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    (Original post by brightxburns)
    It really wasn't what I expected at all.
    And now I'm seriously rethinking my vague ambition to become a barrister.
    I'm not sure I would find a legal career stimulating or satisfying, or whether it would even be achievable for me.

    Did anyoen else feel like this after their first year of Uni? Or did you all coast along effortlessly?
    Bear in mind also that practice is very different to study. The Bar is, by necessity, more focussed on the law itself but a solicitor does far more than simply "black letter" law.
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    Me too, I just found the style of teaching far too blackletter. Most of the content is incredibly dry and the style of learning (i.e just reading case after journal after case) just does nothing for me. And don't get me started on the textbooks! Who on earth writes those things?!

    It has made me seriously consider whether or not I want to finish my degree, but it all seems too little too late. If I did drop out now or change course thats at least £5000 of loans wasted, with nothing to show for it.

    At least one good thing is I'm getting good grades in law (managed a 2:1 for first year dispite illness), so I can cope with it academically. Its just my sanity I'm worried about straining.
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    Me too, I just found the style of teaching far too blackletter. Most of the content is incredibly dry and the style of learning (i.e just reading case after journal after case) just does nothing for me. And don't get me started on the textbooks! Who on earth writes those things?!

    It has made me seriously consider whether or not I want to finish my degree, but it all seems too little too late. If I did drop out now or change course thats at least £5000 of loans wasted, with nothing to show for it.

    At least one good thing is I'm getting good grades in law (managed a 2:1 for first year dispite illness), so I can cope with it academically. Its just my sanity I'm worried about straining.
    I don't see why the fact that there was so much reading came as such a shock. On my very first day I was told that if I didn't like reading I was in the wrong course. To answer the question I loved my first year. I found the cases and articles quite interesting and as for text books - no matter what subject you do they are going to be full on!!!!
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    I felt exactly the same. So much so that I hardly did any work/go to lectures/tutorials (particularly 2nd semester onwards) and subsequently failed some modules which I now have to re-do.
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    I felt the same and a lot of law students I know did too. Honestly, who the hell is seriously interested about memorising case law for taxation, commercial law and contracts at the age of 18 (or ever, for that matter)?? I felt all of my friends were studying way more interesting things as humanities students.

    However, as soon as I hit 3rd year (erasmus student) and 4th year, when I got to study at a more advanced level, questioning the law from a critical standpoint and reading more about legal theory and philosophy than cases and statutes, I began to really enjoy it so much so that I'd rather study an LLM than an LPC.

    If I was you I'd persevere - when you get to the more advanced level of study it's a lot more interesting - you can direct your studies in the area that interests you (law and society, criminal law, international law etc). Yeah basically law is boring and dry but it is a great degree to have whether you want to practice or not. You can do a masters or something in a better subject once you have it as a base. I don't intend to qualify but it will help me get into several different careers.
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    (Original post by mickeyfit)
    I don't see why the fact that there was so much reading came as such a shock. On my very first day I was told that if I didn't like reading I was in the wrong course. To answer the question I loved my first year. I found the cases and articles quite interesting and as for text books - no matter what subject you do they are going to be full on!!!!
    Its not the quantity of reading per se, it was the content of what you had to read. The style, form etc. The language is antiquated, and particularly if you come from a very lower-class area is quite a struggle to unravel at times.

    And in terms of the articles/textbooks, there often appears so little energy or life in them. Don't get me wrong, I love to read, but there is a difference between knowledgeable writers and those who know how to engage and inspire their audience
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    I think if you only have a 'vague' ambition to be a barrister you need to get your thoughts together.

    Most people I know who are seeking a career at the Bar have been working towards it from an early age; work experiences, relevant extra curriculars, mini pupillages, networking, etc etc.

    xx
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    I actually quite enjoyed my first year, the subject on its own can be quite dry but if you get together with a few other folk from the course it can become a bit easier and more entertaining. I spent most of my time either in the library or with my lips wrapped around a bottle of single malt.
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    (Original post by blinkbelle)
    I think if you only have a 'vague' ambition to be a barrister you need to get your thoughts together.

    Most people I know who are seeking a career at the Bar have been working towards it from an early age; work experiences, relevant extra curriculars, mini pupillages, networking, etc etc.

    xx

    I am aware of that. Which is why I've done a bit of mooting, and I did work experience (including a mini-pupillage) before starting my degree. I was full of enthusiasm before I actually started to study law.
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    (Original post by mr_qwerty)
    Which uni do you attend?

    Have you thought this through? i.e. is your course unbearably boring or perhaps did you set the bar too high for your expectations?

    Aside from the course, how do you find the whole uni experience? perhaps if you dislike the uni and colleagues then this negative experience is having an effect and relaying onto your opinions of your course?
    Not at all. I attend a good University (not where I'd originally hoped to go, but it's not bad, by any means) and I absolutely adore my University life. The social side is amazing, my Uni friends are like my second family, I feel very comfortable, and I'm involved in interesting extracurricular things. The only BAD part of my whole 'Uni experience' was my subject itself.
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    (Original post by globalista)
    If I was you I'd persevere - when you get to the more advanced level of study it's a lot more interesting - you can direct your studies in the area that interests you (law and society, criminal law, international law etc). Yeah basically law is boring and dry but it is a great degree to have whether you want to practice or not. You can do a masters or something in a better subject once you have it as a base. I don't intend to qualify but it will help me get into several different careers.
    What do you intend to do after your law degree?
    I really hope I can persevere. I know that a law degree looks good on paper, but, since I'm almost certain that a legal career isn't for me, I'm not sure that it's worth it any more. I feel like my time might be better spent doing something that I really enjoy and can thus excel in.
    Plus, it's virtually useless unless I can achieve a 2.1, and I'm not sure I have the drive to do so.

    I just don't know what to do.
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    Hmm...

    Well a surprisingly large proportion of LLB graduates don't go onto practicing law and instead find work in other fields such as politic, marketing, real estate etc once graduated. This may be an option for you if you feel your career will be dreary (As the LLB opens a wide range of doors). So you could just 'ride out' the next 2 years.

    However, if its bothering you that much, an option may be to ask if the uni can transfer you onto a course of your choice that you may enjoy more (i.e. english literature). Or if they cant transfer you, then you'd have to drop out and reapply - if your desperate to escpace the LLB.

    The only problem with that is that you will have wasted the money spent from your first year on the LLB. However, it may be worth it if you think you wont be able to attain atleast a 2.1 in law etc. So you've got to weight up the pro's and con's.

    The first year is meant to be the most enjoyable - so i'd asume things would get much worse. Although on the flipside you may become more engaged with the subject as it deepens.

    Can you see yourself riding out another 2 years at uni studying law? would you be able to get atleast a 2.1 in law?
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    Just out of curiousity, what subjects have you studied in your first year?

    At my Uni, we had to study all compulsory subjects in first year and then in second and third year got to choose 2, and had 2 compulsory. I found second year much easier to bear because I'd chosen 2 subjects that interested me. This might apply to your situation.

    xxx
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    Just sack up and get on with it. I didn't like my first year at all but what you gonna do? You've only got 2 years left and it'll fly by.

    Getting a good 2:1 in law will put you ahead of most people in the job race so it's definitely worth it.
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    Change the way you study. You are probably studying the subject like a first year: i.e. just learning what textbooks say for exams and regurgitating it. You will probably find it much more interesting if you look into some of the controversies and use journal articles; and change your textbooks if you find current ones too boring.

    Doesn't sound like you would make a good barrister, but look more into the solicitors side of things before writing it off.
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    (Original post by flugestuge)
    I am fairly sure that you are at Birmingham.
    Sadly, the Bar is largely Oxbridge.
    Unless you are absolutely driven and achieve a First, the Bar is probably out of your reach.
    A vague ambition is unlikely to be enough.
    Let's be clear on this. Whilst there may be a preponderance of Oxbridge students at the top end of the Bar, it is simply not correct to say "the Bar is largely Oxbridge".

    The most recently available statistics show that nearly 70% of pupils in 05/06 went to a university other than Oxbridge. It is those statistics, rather than any which show the educational background of the profession generally (and which reflect decades of bias towards Oxbridge), which are of relevance to someone wanting to become a barrister now.

    Those figures of 30% Oxbridge/70% non-Oxbridge are also backed up by a survey Simon Myerson did recently looking at the background of junior members of the Bar: http://pupillageandhowtogetit.wordpr...sity/oxbridge/
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    the fact is a law degree is a "qualifying" degree for practise, whether most people would choose to study contract , land and equity if given the chance is debatable, but they are vital foundations of a legal mind - law is not the most flexible subject, it is a professional degree and most of what law schools here teach is somewhat oriented around that.

    (especially in this country - look at some of the courses harvard offers if you want a "flexible law degree" - courses on “Japanese Law Film,” and “Self, Serenity, and Vulnerability: East and West” which bills itself as a meaningful study of the meaninglessness of human life. It promises a comparison of some of the ways in which philosophy, religion, and art in the East and West have dealt with the fear that our lives and the world itself may be meaningless. The analysis of comparative meaninglessness will include guest lectures by transactional partners at New York and Hong Kong law firms.")

    These courses may be more "interesting" but whether they are as "useful" is debatable - but you knew what options were available before you chose the course, surely it is not the universities fault if you if you did not do enough research on what you would actually be studying. If you really find it unbearable apply to transfer, your uni will probably approve it if you are genuine
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    Your course will get more interesting as you have more choice of what to study, but I'd try to transfer. Find a subject you can get excited about and you'll be much more likely to do well. You could always do the GDL after uni if you decide law is for you after all. You'd be asked in interviews why you transferred out of law but you could say something like "I really wanted to study English Literature as it's always been a passion of mine, but I already knew I wanted to be a lawyer so I knew I wouldn't have the chance to learn about it later". I don't think there's a big advantage in having an LLB rather an a BA/BSc + GDL.
 
 
 
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