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Does cognititve behavioural therapy really work? Watch

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    I've begun having CBT for anxiety and depression, so far I've had the first of 8 sessions and it felt really helpfull and I think it could make a massive difference in my life.
    The problem is, i'm terrified it won't work and at the end of the sessions I won't really have changed at all, and I don't know what I would do then because I feel like this is my only chance to "fix" my problems and if I mess it up my life will never improve. The psychologist has given me work sheets and exercises to do, but i'm so scared of not working hard enough or of getting it wrong that the thought of doing it at all makes me feel so stressed and frustrated and now I can't stop crying.
    The idea that CBT could actually work just seems too good to be true.
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    It can work if you have a therapist who comes at it from a human being-ness angle and not purely a filling out forms and worksheets angle.

    CBT is in its early days still.
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    CBT is a joke.


    At least for me.


    But if it's working for you, keep doing it

    Concentrate on the here and now- take each day as it comes- if you stop the sessions, then they won't have worked for you and you won't improve. Keep to the sessions- express your concerns to your counsellor if needs be. They'll be the best person to help you =]
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    My cousin was given cbt for his panic attacks, it worked at home but not at work so he had to ask the therapist to create him another program that related the CBT to his work.

    That was over a year ago and to my knowledge he's not had a panic attack since ... So I think it dose work!
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    Yes it does, if you're heart's in it and you want to get better. You get what you put in, so to speak
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    (Original post by Antimatter)
    Yes it does, if you're heart's in it and you want to get better. You get what you put in, so to speak
    That is not entirely fair.

    The therapy style does not suit everyone. And the personal style of the practitioner is key to how well it works or not.

    Again, it is simply not fair to suggest that if it does not work for someone they aren't working hard enough. That is not helpful and just not true. How dare you.
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    depends on a number of things - whether you remain open-minded to it or not, whether you are actually working with a skilled-practitioner who is good and who knows what they are doing, whether their style is any good. I've got some personal experience with it and I thought it was a load of BS but I know people who've had a lot of luck with it.
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    (Original post by saoirse)
    That is not entirely fair.

    The therapy style does not suit everyone. And the personal style of the practitioner is key to how well it works or not.

    Again, it is simply not fair to suggest that if it does not work for someone they aren't working hard enough. That is not helpful and just not true. How dare you.
    Don't be so defensive!
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    Don't be so defensive!
    Lol. Its not defensiveness, more anger- I flare up when I see people making sweeping statements about health and mental health especially. There are no givens and no absolutes. And it can be incredibly damaging to try to force a particular set of ideals on a person going through a difficult time.

    But yes my short fuse is something I have to work on:p:
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    Hmm... I don't know.

    I have my third session tomorrow (well my 7th if you count the ones I started last year) and I find myself leaving more depressed then when I came in. I don't like talking about things, I don't like dwelling on them. I've done the 'homework' I was meant to and I just find it a waste of time. I've always known the thoughts-feelings-behavior cycle and I've always recognized the reoccurring negative thoughts. I've even tried to think of more positive thoughts to replace them.

    I'm hoping I'm wrong and CBT works because if it doesn't work I'm a bit screwed considering antidepressants aren't helping and my depression is getting worse.
    But I find myself trying not to roll my eyes whenever the Psychologist (who I actually quite like) says something like write down the thoughts running through your head now. For me it isn't helpful because it means I'm forced to think about it and I lack the mental energy to actually sit down and deal with my problems which kind of defeats the whole point of CBT.

    Sorry, this is pretty convoluted. Hopefully you semi understand what I mean...

    I'm trying to be open minded but frankly, CBT seems like complete bs to me.
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    If you get along with and can open up and speak to your therapist, and have a genuine desire to get better... those are the most important things. Oh, and don't expect it to be easy. Don't hold back - if you don't tell them things, they can't help!

    I was told that I was always going to be anxious/have characteristics that are OCD (but to look at the positive side of this; while being a perfectionist is stressful, it also means I'm likely to try so hard I do well), but they'd be more manageable/less intrusive.

    The main key, I think, it's learning to self-monitor and REALISE a particular thought or feeling it due to anxiety, and them implement the techniques you learn from CBT to correct it yourself, outside the therapy, continuing its benefit.

    I've only studied A-level psychology, but I can dig out my revision notes and find some study references about it's success, if you like.
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    As for you, Diamond, how long have you been taking the anti-depressants? They do take a while to work in your system (you've probably been told, so sorry for being redundant.) Or if they continue to not have any effect, perhaps you could ask to switch and try something else?

    I didn't enjoy the "homeworks" either, but I think laughing at what I put down (what my therapist basically got me to do - ie, confronting how silly the thoughts were) helped heaps.
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    You only won't change if you don't try and let yourself. The more you think it won't work, the more negatively you're thinking which is the opposite of the principles of CBT: To think positively and change your outlook on things. I don't see how you could get the worksheets wrong other than being too negative and not trying to change your thought patterns. Keep at it if you think it's helping and you're progressing
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    Personally, no. Think it's a lot of ****.
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    I'll let you know if they ever get back to me and give me a damn appointment >,<
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    If you feel like it's making an improvement so far then I would definitely perservere with the sessions. Don't try and look to far ahead, take every session as it comes. Nobody knows what the future holds but if its working for now then that's definitely a good thing.

    It certainly helped my friend who had ME. She raves about it. I understand it doesn't work for everyone but if it works for you that's great.
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    Depends what for. It led to me actually being able to have vaccinations in spite of a really quite severe needle phobia, but then that's just me. It may work for you, it may not. There are a lot of factors involved.

    I'll happily admit that I went into it with a bit of a "pah, how d'they think this is going to work, this is all stupid" attitude, but on the other hand I did actually really want it to work, in spite of my lack of faith. And (in spite of still thinking it was all daft and that I knew it all already throughout most sessions), I stuck at it, which is important as it doesn't work overnight. You have to bear in mind, though, that nothing for depression and anxiety is an instant magic bullet; not talking therapy, not even drugs; nothing. And it's a pain in the unmentionables, but there you go.

    My advice would be to stick with it, OP. Yes, it's frustrating when you feel you're getting nowhere, or that you just want to chuck it all in instead of doing all the 'homework' for it. It's difficult to have to go through all your thought processes and try and work out what to do instead. But it might just work, if you give it your best shot and as much trust as you can muster. If not, then at the very least I doubt it'll do you any lasting harm to have tried.
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    stick to it, try your best and if it doesn't work try other methods, there's lots of stuff you can try, but don't feel disheartened it's not the be all and end all.

    Well done to get to the top of the waiting list, I've been trying to get CBT for a good couple of years but instead just keep getting pumped with medications.
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    The trick to CBT is to keep it up. There's no point thinking it's a cure whilst in your session, then reverting back to your old habits as soon as you leave the session. CBT needs time to work, your thinking patterns won't change overnight. It takes a lot of hard work and a long time to change the way you think.
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    I had CBT for anorexia and depression a few years ago and it definitely didn't completely cure my anxiety issues, but it does help you to deal with your anxiety.It seems to be more about teaching you techniques to help you cope with your feelings and behaviour, rather than being a cure for them. Stick at it and im sure you will get something out of it.
 
 
 
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