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    Is this a profession in which you pretty much NEED to get a 2:1 to get a job? If it is, then think about if you will get the 2:1 doing it this year. To be honest it's great you're on a 2:1 and I think surely that should slightly motivate you? Forget about what your parents will think, to be honest you need to do this for yourself, not them.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Your choices are: defer, leave, finish.
    Nope. Transfer (there may be other universities who'll take him/her and there's always the Open University which isn't to be sniffed at). What's more, being at the Open University allows the student to take it at their own pace.

    There's also a very important thing here that I don't think has been mentioned. The OP has a mental health condition and, as a result, is protected under the Disability Discimination Act (1995) and Special Educational Needs Act (2001). This requires the university to make reasonable adjustments and not leave students with disabilities or health conditions at a disadvantage.

    Unfortunately both are still open to interpretation to some extent, especially SENDA. What counts as a reasonable adjustment is open to debate and will depend on personal circumstances. But one thing the university may allow is coursework based assessment rather than exams. This may mean that you can have a more steady continous assessment and they'll also be more flexible with deadlines. This obviously doesn't happen with an exam. Not all universities or departments will agree to this, but it's worth getting in touch and seeing what they can do.

    Have you (the OP) ever received Disabled Students Allowance or any sort of support from the disability office/mental health team and can they not provide further advice?

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I took a year out the year before, so it wont go down too well with my parents. Too many gap years will look negatively on my CV especially if I end up with a 2:2. Also, I just know deep down inside that if I do take a year out again, I know I wont go back.

    I am 23 atm.
    23 is still young. I'm 24 and haven't finished my degree yet (I took two years out for personal/health reasons). Just because you'll be two or three years older doesn't mean you have to resign yourself to a crappy job or being unemployed. People graduate at all kinds of different ages.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    c) My current set of "friends", will also be graduated by then. Meaning that I will have to start from scratch.
    I can see what that's a concern. It may be a lonely experience, or certainly a daunting one, having to start again and form new relationships. But it isn't necessarily always a bad one. You can think about it on the postive side, a chance to increase your social work and you don't know what kinds of people you'll meet and get to know and they'll hopefully be more supportive.
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    (Original post by kai4321)
    Is this a profession in which you pretty much NEED to get a 2:1 to get a job? If it is, then think about if you will get the 2:1 doing it this year. To be honest it's great you're on a 2:1 and I think surely that should slightly motivate you? Forget about what your parents will think, to be honest you need to do this for yourself, not them.
    I am a Computing Science major, so no. Plus I have plenty of work experience behind me from freelancing.

    I will probably be OK with a 2:2, but truth to be told, after everything that has happened I may just leave the IT industry completely. Doing a masters in psychology has crossed my mind, or working in something completely unrelated such as marketing.

    However saying that not having a 2:1 shuts doors to big companies, like I would love to work for accenture as a consultant if I remained in IT.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Nope. Transfer (there may be other universities who'll take him/her and there's always the Open University which isn't to be sniffed at). What's more, being at the Open University allows the student to take it at their own pace.

    There's also a very important thing here that I don't think has been mentioned. The OP has a mental health condition and, as a result, is protected under the Disability Discimination Act (1995) and Special Educational Needs Act (2001). This requires the university to make reasonable adjustments and not leave students with disabilities or health conditions at a disadvantage.

    Unfortunately both are still open to interpretation to some extent, especially SENDA. What counts as a reasonable adjustment is open to debate and will depend on personal circumstances. But one thing the university may allow is coursework based assessment rather than exams. This may mean that you can have a more steady continous assessment and they'll also be more flexible with deadlines. This obviously doesn't happen with an exam. Not all universities or departments will agree to this, but it's worth getting in touch and seeing what they can do.

    Have you (the OP) ever received Disabled Students Allowance or any sort of support from the disability office/mental health team and can they not provide further advice?
    Aside from them telling me to use the university councelling service, not much else.

    My department have though taken this into account, the events of the past year and have told me that I may at best get leway if I miss a 2:1 or whatever mark marginally.

    Courseworks yeah I generally do well on. But my department will not give me that leway as it means that they will have to reorganise their course structure for me.

    23 is still young. I'm 24 and haven't finished my degree yet (I took two years out for personal/health reasons). Just because you'll be two or three years older doesn't mean you have to resign yourself to a crappy job or being unemployed. People graduate at all kinds of different ages.
    Yeah, I see what you mean. From past experience though, it is very hard to get a decent job without a degree. And after investing so much time doing it, despite my concerns I do seek closure now. But I worry about my mental health up there.

    I can see what that's a concern. It may be a lonely experience, or certainly a daunting one, having to start again and form new relationships. But it isn't necessarily always a bad one. You can think about it on the postive side, a chance to increase your social work and you don't know what kinds of people you'll meet and get to know and they'll hopefully be more supportive.
    Just wont have time, due to the reasons stated in my previous thread. My assignments typically take weeks to do for example, and given the sheer nature of the degree it doesn't help that it is an introverted one. Plus aquaintances are easy to come by, anything meaningful isn't. Furthermore, at uni a lot of socialising involves getting drunk continiously night after night, which is great in first year when you have nothing else better to do.
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    just stick with your degree and do the third year
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    Well the best advice probably would be to suck it up and finish this 3rd year. Honestly, I don't know what I would do in your situation but how hard can it be to make friends? You don't seem like the kind of guy that has no social skills so couldn't you join a lot of societies or whatever and make some friends then so you have some for your last year?
 
 
 
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