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    I highly doubt you'd have enough time to have a job, tbh. I just finished my first year of SPS - by no means the hardest subject/the most to learn - and after working & sleeping, while I did find adequate time to socialise, it would've either been that or a job - and I prefer socialising, tbh.

    From what I gather, you're doing Medicine, so you'll have zero time for a part time job if you ever want to see your friends or do anything outside your subject.
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    (Original post by Sugar_Puff_Fairy)
    Yeah I've never understood how lots of students from average/low income families cope if they're 'not allowed' to work. I'm at KCL and once my rent's paid etc I don't have enough money to even eat left from my loan so have to work. I wish I didn't though, especially now going into third year!
    Apart from what the others mentioned, you have to remember that we only have three 8 week terms which add up to less than 6 months of the entire year. If people need to supplement their SLC money and University bursary through employment, there are plenty of 'free' months to work in.
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    What do they consider to be a "job"?

    I do work for a family business and a charity and intend to only really work in the holidays (or maybe a couple of hours a week answering the odd email) but would they object to being a registered director of these organisations during term time?

    I'd always assumed that they just oppose the idea of people having time commitments etc.
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    (Original post by Piricad)
    What do they consider to be a "job"?

    I do work for a family business and a charity and intend to only really work in the holidays (or maybe a couple of hours a week answering the odd email) but would they object to being a registered director of these organisations during term time?

    I'd always assumed that they just oppose the idea of people having time commitments etc.
    I doubt they would "object" because it's very unlikely they would even KNOW - they don't run background checks to ensure you aren't working!

    I know some people who do work in their free time, especially for Oxbridge Essays/Applications etc, but I - personally - don't have enough time. It all depends on how many ECs you participate in, how efficiently you work, what you like to do with your free time, etc.

    I think the "no-job" rule is a bit antiquated and could do with being killed off. We are adults, and supposedly intelligent ones at that, so if someone thinks they can hold down a job and still do well in their degree I don't think they should be told they can't. It's a personal decision and, thankfully, most colleges seem to be uninterested anyway. It's not as strict as people think.

    As for the comments regarding "colleges throwing money at you so you don't have to work" - I don't think this is true AT ALL. Yes, most Cambridge colleges have generous bursary schemes etc, but they are not as easy to access as people on this forum make out. If your family earns a decent income, you are likely to precluded from accessing any additional finance (above that provided by the student loans company) at all. I have a friend who assumed she would get loads of money because of not being allowed a job, and she had a hard time adjusting when she found out that college wouldn't give her anything because of her household income.
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    (Original post by Piricad)
    I'd always assumed that they just oppose the idea of people having time commitments etc.
    Some DoS's, including mine, "limit" their students to one EC activity/sport. They aren't really strict about it, but do highly recommend not committing yourself to too much, which is sensible advice.
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    (Original post by jcb914)
    Some DoS's, including mine, "limit" their students to one EC activity/sport. They aren't really strict about it, but do highly recommend not committing yourself to too much, which is sensible advice.
    DoSes generally seem grumpy (or pretend to) at the thought that you might have any commitments outside of your academic work! This is a simple fact of Cambridge and is something you (and they) just put up with.

    Everyone signs up for too much in their first term and will quickly find themselves overstretched. Now I have two extra-curriculars I'm involved in regularly (even if it's often just socialising with the society rather than actually doing); both can easily eat up entire weekends or more during term time so I have to be very careful. I'm quite lucky in that with these I can pick and choose opportunities as they come rather than being tied into things as I would be if I joined a sports team, for example. Interestingly neither are ones I was involved in in my first term, though they were both things I started university wanting to do rather than discovering completely new.

    BTW there are some acceptable student jobs... one in particular, if you're into theatre for example, is working the bar / box office of the university theatre (the ADC). Some colleges also have student-run bars. Though things like this are going to be more for getting beer money than a serious income.
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    I think there's probably a healthy balance. For example, if you are working 20 hours a week doing late nights in a bar it's probably going to have a negative impact on your studies. Whereas if you were to sign up to one of the many promotional agencies where you can choose your hours and times of work there surely cannot be a problem.

    I've just applied for a position I saw on Cambridge Gumtree, it states that there is only a few hours of work each month and that the work is can be flexible to fit around studies and a social life.

    I don't think that this is likely to impact too much on my studies. I'm interested to know the earning potential though as the ad just says 'great incentives'

    What do you think?
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    You're not allowed a job during term time. They can't actually stop you from getting one, but if they find out that you have one then action can be taken against you, so it's not really worth it when you consider what's at stake. In quite a few cases I don't think they'd actually do anything though, unless you were missing lectures/supervisions or not doing work because of it... but frankly, it's unlikely that you'll find enough time to have a job. This depends a lot on which subject you do, I suppose.

    You're a lot better off finding holiday work and/or internships for when you're not at uni. I think some colleges let students work part-time in the library for fairly good rates, but I'm not 100% sure how that works.
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    Looking at it in an entirely cynical and mercenary way, there is NO POINT whatsoever in working if your college will give you the money instead as financial support. Of course it varies college to college, but you really ought to investigate what's available to you; generally, if you're in the position of having to consider working part time in order to get enough money to survive, then your college bursar will probably help you. If it's just for beer tokens, probably not.

    Yes, my experience is limited, but the funds and the support are there, but they might as well not be if you're reticent and don't find out about them.
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    (Original post by nuodai)
    You're not allowed a job during term time. They can't actually stop you from getting one, but if they find out that you have one then action can be taken against you, so it's not really worth it when you consider what's at stake. In quite a few cases I don't think they'd actually do anything though, unless you were missing lectures/supervisions or not doing work because of it... but frankly, it's unlikely that you'll find enough time to have a job. This depends a lot on which subject you do, I suppose.

    You're a lot better off finding holiday work and/or internships for when you're not at uni. I think some colleges let students work part-time in the library for fairly good rates, but I'm not 100% sure how that works.
    cambridge sounds pretty **** tbh from this perspective. Your "not allowed" to work? wtf, how old are we, 10?
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    (Original post by mikey ugg)
    cambridge sounds pretty **** tbh from this perspective. Your "not allowed" to work? wtf, how old are we, 10?
    It's very petty, I'll agree with you there.
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    (Original post by mikey ugg)
    cambridge sounds pretty **** tbh from this perspective. Your "not allowed" to work? wtf, how old are we, 10?
    Or keep a car within however-many miles of Great St Mary's church. Although I think this one could be justified on the grounds that wanting to drive in Cambridge suggests that you're stark staring mad.
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    (Original post by TheUnbeliever)
    Or keep a car within however-many miles of Great St Mary's church. Although I think this one could be justified on the grounds that wanting to drive in Cambridge suggests that you're stark staring mad.
    I always wondered how that affects students who come from that area and have a car (which they leave at home) before they get here...
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    Well, the reason I got from someone who works at Oxford Uni (I know Oxford isnt the same as Cambridge but I thought the logic would work the same) was that they didnt think it would be fair that some students have to work and some have the means so they dont need to be put into that position so they banned jobs in term time so that there wouldnt be an inequality i think but then i suppose this could apply to other unis but I suppose Oxbridge is a bit special with eight week terms tbh.
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    (Original post by AlexG55)
    I always wondered how that affects students who come from that area and have a car (which they leave at home) before they get here...
    I was told I couldn't legally drive it during term time without letting the proctors know that I've got a car in town. It was parked at my flat ffs. :rolleyes:
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    I think it really depends on what kind of job it is. I did some freelance editorial work while I was studying which was done online and was not very taxing at all. I very highly advise against a 'proper' part time job though: even if you think you'll have enough time, you'll be so exhausted trying to keep it all together that it will probably break you.
 
 
 
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