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Should charity chief executives earn big salaries? Watch

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    There was a previous thread on this, but it was deleted - I assume because the OP was very obviously a troll.

    Anyway, I still thought this was a good point for debate.

    You can find the salaries of charity chief executives in the UK here - http://society.guardian.co.uk/salary...043285,00.html

    Paul Nurse of Cancer Research UK, for example, earns £140k a year. On the one hand, he is a renowned scientist and probably very good at his job. On the other hand, he is detracting an obscene amount of money from a charity. The average wage in the UK is £20k and his wage is seven times this. But, pay peanuts and get monkeys - right?

    Discuss.
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    (Original post by JW92)
    There was a previous thread on this, but it was deleted - I assume because the OP was very obviously a troll.

    Anyway, I still thought this was a good point for debate.

    You can find the salaries of charity chief executives in the UK here - http://society.guardian.co.uk/salary...043285,00.html

    Paul Nurse of Cancer Research UK, for example, earns £140k a year. On the one hand, he is a renowned scientist and probably very good at his job. On the other hand, he is detracting an obscene amount of money from a charity. The average wage in the UK is £20k and his wage is seven times this. But, pay peanuts and get monkeys - right?

    Discuss.
    Pretty much :yes:

    That said though, I wouldn't feel comfortable raking in £140k from a charity :erm:
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    (Original post by Nick_000)
    That said though, I wouldn't feel comfortable raking in £140k from a charity :erm:
    This is the bit that gets me too. You can understand the position of the chairty giving out the money, but I would feel completely immoral taking that kind of money.
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    All I have to say is: they deserve to receive big salaries FAR FAR more than the likes of bankers and inner-city jobsworths.
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    It's a difficult question, howver I think the OP quote of "pay peanuts get monkeys" is the most important.

    If you have the right person at the head of a charity then that will help the funding of the charity, and help maximise their budget. And I think this is the most important. It is easy to see 140K and think thats a ludricrous amount, however if you have a smaller salary tat would have a knock down effect to having less money in the charity as a whole.

    The chiefs of charities work their arses off (probably) and are intrinsic to that charities standing. And so, I do not think it is wrong to have high salaries in charities. It will encourage more people to work for charities as well.

    Also it has been noted, I feel far more comfortable with high wages in charities, then high salaries for bankers or prats who work in the city (any prats who aim to work in the financial sector, my apologies).
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    You must also consider that these people have a huge amount of responsibility in these organistations. They probably aren't doing that much work, but because they're ultimately the head of all the runnings, their salary has to be high. CEO's are very capable and intelligent people, and decent ones are quite rare. A charity, especially, needs a good CEO and therefore needs to have a competitive wage.
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    I wouldn't be suprised if a charity CEO on £140,000 a year would end up giving proportionally more of his/her salary to charity (their own or others) than other businesspeople on similar salaries.
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    (Original post by JW92)
    This is the bit that gets me too. You can understand the position of the chairty giving out the money, but I would feel completely immoral taking that kind of money.
    Why? You're giving the charity what they want. You're not depriving them of any value.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Why? You're giving the charity what they want. You're not depriving them of any value.
    I'd feel as if I were living an excessive lifestyle at the expense of a charity - you could provide the same skills for a more reasonable amount. Good people donated the money that would end up as my salary. I see your reasoning, but it definitely wouldn't sit right with me.
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    They should be well paid as you want to attract high quality managers and staff, but there's well paid and obscene. Nobody working for a charity should earn more than £50k.
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    yes they work hard for it
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    He's managing to bring in £305m a year for Cancer Research. £140k, whilst it is a lot of money, it's not obscene considering the size and income of the charity.

    "Salvation Army Alex Hughes 10,540"

    Wow, that's very impressive.
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    (Original post by OhNO!)
    He's managing to bring in £305m a year for Cancer Research. £140k, whilst it is a lot of money, it's not obscene considering the size and income of the charity.

    "Salvation Army Alex Hughes 10,540"

    Wow, that's very impressive.
    I know, props to Alex Hughes. He's obviously in it for better reasons than a fat salary.

    Edit - "The costs of Mr Hughes' housing, furniture, car, council tax and insurance are paid for by the charity."
    Maybe I spoke too soon.
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    (Original post by JW92)
    I know, props to Alex Hughes. He's obviously in it for better reasons than a fat salary.

    Edit - "The costs of Mr Hughes' housing, furniture, car, council tax and insurance are paid for by the charity."
    Maybe I spoke too soon.
    I assumed those fell under "benefits". Maybe not.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    there's well paid and obscene
    I agree with this, to be honest. Putting it in perspective, you're average teacher gets paid £25k - nearly a sixth of Sir. Paul Nurse's salary.
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    yeh they should be paid alot.

    in a big charity, paying extra for a good CEO, will allow the charity to attract people who are good at their job. who will increase efficiency to cut costs elsewhere, and through new ideas/campaigns etc may well lead the charity to raise ALOT more money. so i imagine they easily pay for themselves a few times over
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    television ads ask for £3 amonth from people ,how many people are contributing just to pay the chief execs salary?
 
 
 
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