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Recommendations for a road bike Watch

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    After looking on loot, gumtree, freecycle and the like, and looking at buying first-hand too, I've come to the conclusion that I'm better off buying a road bike, and not an exercise bike.

    For reasons of cost, getting a quality cardio workout, well, getting fresh air and getting out and about etc...I did have personally legitimate reasons for thinking about buying an exercise bike but there's no point going into them now. Even if I was to spend £45-ish on a second-hand exercise bike, I'd be understandably concerned about just how decent the resistance is, in terms of offering a quality workout that makes the heart work genuinely hard. Anyway, I've made a decision and I'm sticking to it and I'm going to buy a road bike, sooner rather than later.

    Any advice for shops to visit?

    I have only ever bought mountain bikes but now I'd like a road bike. I don't want to be spending loads and loads on one and I don't have a good idea of how much a good road bike would cost me. I'm by no means skint, I do have money, but I'm no Tour De France competitor so buying something ridiculously expensive, for a first-time road biker, would probably be a bit silly.

    Shops to look in and bike model/specifications recommendations would be appreciated.

    WHW.
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    Get a hardtail, much more versatile.
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    > or < than 500 to spend.
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    I don't want to be spending that amount of money.
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    (Original post by azhao)
    Get a hardtail, much more versatile.
    cycling jargon meaning what precisely?
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    You should get a second hand (or acquire a personal relations / friends) before you buy one. You may not like it.

    But

    (A) Get a road bike if you want to get fit

    (B) Get one off e-bay - if you do want to buy one I would be wiling to give you 10 minutes of my time pointing out what to look for

    (C) If you want a new one I would suggest a winter training bike from ribble; http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/SpecialEditionBikes.asp £550:00 = a steal
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    cycling jargon meaning what precisely?
    Sorry, front suspension, no rear suspension. From my experience hardtails are fairly good on roads and off-road. Unless your environment is completely urban or completely mountains then a hardtail is much more useful.
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    I forgot to say, I would look at second-hand options.

    What options could they be?
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    (Original post by azhao)
    Sorry, front suspension, no rear suspension. From my experience hardtails are fairly good on roads and off-road. Unless your environment is completely urban or completely mountains then a hardtail is much more useful.
    In terms of fitness and enjoyment and riding parcipitation a racing (road) bike would be wise. It is faster, better for planning routes and other people who ride bikes to race have weekend social rides were they may do say a gentle 60 or 70 miles - keeping up on a mountain bike is beyond absurd.

    Unless you race on your mountainbike (in which case you train for fitness on a road bike and do a ride once every week or fornight on your mountainbike for technical skills) then you are just another teenager with a mountainbike that is - well - useless.
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    DeanK22, what you've said is pretty much what I want from a new bike.

    I'll be cycling, regularly, only on road, wanting to hit good speeds, cover lengthy distances, whilst obviously improving my fitness in the process.
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    Definitely go for ebay - in order to get a sensible bottom-end racing bike new, you wouldn't want to spend much less than £500. However, there are always tons of bikes on ebay so you can find some really good deals. I got mine for £150 (and that's including clip-in pedals and clip-on aero bars) and I'm really happy with it.

    If you want to ride for fitness and don't intend to go off-road, I'd definitely go for a road bike - a mountain or hybrid bike might give you a bit more versatility but I don't think it's worth it compared to the extra speed that a road bike will give you. It's a lot more fun cycling on the road when you're not wasting so much of your effort on overcoming a ****ton of rolling resistance and a bad aerodynamic riding position.
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    PS Helper
    unless you do off road cycling having a mountain bike is pointless, they are far heavier than road bikes, unless you put slicks or semi slicks on the mountain bike they have chunky tyres which mean you waste lots of energy. therefore get a racing bike.
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    I've never bought or sold anything on e-bay before. I'll look into it.
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    I'm perhaps best going to a generic sports store, i.e. Decathlon, and looking at road bikes 'in the flesh' and getting an idea of what is what, gears, how slim tyres are/can be, prices...

    I have been 'cycling' quite alot, only in the gym, for the past 4 months and it's a bit daft when I could have a road bike, doing it outside, for longer periods, hitting nice speeds and improving my fitness in the meantime. And having some fun at the same time....

    I don't know what brands I should be looking at and the model and model specifications I should be looking/aiming for. I am a bit wary about buying something online without having seen it first, literally, particularly when it's a purchase requiring a significant outlay of money. Bikes are also things I know very little about, in way of technology and what's worth x amount, worth y amount etc...

    Unknown territory to me as such. All I've ever done in the past is go to a local and family-owned bicycle shop (a shop essentially for noobs), only selling Raleigh bikes, and getting myself a Raleigh mountain bike, the last one I got being 10-11 years ago...

    Having said that it's a significant outlay, I believe I'll make the investment cost-effective. Dedicated to keeping physically fit/active and I've moved on to doing more lower impact exercise, i.e. swimming and cycling, instead of going running and entering 10k and half-marathons. My focus and preference has changed and this should make such a purchase worthwhile....meh maybe I should be willing to spend a bit more money on a road bike.

    I just feel I should see some road bikes 'in the flesh' first and foremost, to develop my knowledge and understanding, tbfh.
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    Go into your local bike shop, and they should hopefully be able to give you some decent advice, and show you a few bikes within your price range that would suit your needs, and I'm sure they'd let you take them out for a test ride.

    If you were to look at buting a new bike I'd say £500 would be a good starting point, if not go second hand (ebay). Most of the big bike manufacturers (Trek, Giant, Bianchi, Specialized etc) dont change the geometry of frames too much year to year, so if you did see a bike on ebay you could go along to your local shop and have a go on the current model.

    As for bike spec, most will have either shimano, Sram or Bontreger (Trek), and aslong as the bike has any of those you should be alright.

    Also just to improve your knowledge on bikes and parts look around some bike websites, to get ideas of price etc, and you'll soon learn what good and what isn't.
    Google Chainreaction, and wiggle.
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    At a quick glance, the prices on chainreaction appear lower than those on wiggle. I've looked on the decathlon website and the lowest priced mens road bike seems to be around £250 - a 'b-twin' model. And the lowest priced bike on chainreaction around £260-ish. Is Decathlon a reasonable enough place to go to, to look at road bikes with a view to buying from there? Or would I be getting truly ripped off for paying £250 for this particular bike when I could be getting something much better, from obviously a more specialist bike company, for just £10 more???

    I can manage with £260-280 kind of price range. I know I won't be getting the ultimate dogs ******** of a bike but that's not what I'm after/not my needs.
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    My local bike shop, when recommending buying something online, points me to the 'cyclelife' website. The lowest priced bikes on here seem rather expensive, £400 for Raleigh bikes. I think I'm going to rule out going down the 'buying from my local bike shop' route.
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    Have you got a link to the bike in Decathlon?

    And yeah, sometimes local bike shops can be good, or, just plain rubbish, and it seems yours is the latter, definatley avoid the Raleigh.

    I'm sure there would be reviews written about some of the bikes you have looked at, so that might be worth looking into, if you are buying online.

    Oh and also what sort of height are you? as you've probably noticed the frames are all measured in "cm", as a rough guide a 58cm frame will suit someone around 6ft, but that is very rough.
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    Decathlon make some decent bikes further up the range (or at least they did last time i saw a review of one) so i don't think the 'sport 1' would be a bad buy for the money. Aluminium frame, shimano gears with a triple chainring, decent brand tyres, it'd definitely do the job.

    To get something substantially better brand new you'd have to look around the £500 mark as others have suggested. Something like a Specialized Allez or for £599 there's the Focus Variado which is stupidly good for them money.

    So i'd say if you're buying new for around £300 then the Decathlon would be fine and i doubt you'd find anything much better at that price (see edit) . If you could stretch (/double) the budget to £5-600 then there is a big step up in quality (lower weight due to less steel components, better gears meaning smoother shifting, lighter wheels which accelerate easier..) and that Focus is stunning for the money.

    Bikes around the £5-700 mark when new should be available for around £2-300 second hand in decent condition (usually knock around 40% off for each year of use) so that is definitely worth considering and would get you the most for your money. Anything from Specialized, Trek or Giant would be a safe bet.

    Edit: Just saw the Vitus bikes on Chainreaction and they do look good for the money as well, probably better than the Decathlon (a few more branded parts like the ITM stem which may be lighter and stiffer and higher spec gears) but there's not a massive amount in it.
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    (Original post by DeanK22)
    In terms of fitness and enjoyment and riding parcipitation a racing (road) bike would be wise. It is faster, better for planning routes and other people who ride bikes to race have weekend social rides were they may do say a gentle 60 or 70 miles - keeping up on a mountain bike is beyond absurd.

    Unless you race on your mountainbike (in which case you train for fitness on a road bike and do a ride once every week or fornight on your mountainbike for technical skills) then you are just another teenager with a mountainbike that is - well - useless.
    I'm sorry but first off I don't even have a bike at the moment, I'm only speaking from experience that a hard-tail, not a full suspension bike is much more versatile in its usage, 60 to 70 miles isn't all that bad on a hardtail in any respect, even with luggage.
 
 
 
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