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Would you say 40k a year is a good salary? What salary would you be happy with? watch

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    Woah what, £40,000 a year sounds immense to me. When I graduate I'm starting on <£20,000 and even that sounds good.
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    Of COURSE it's a good salary. It's way above the national average, why are people acting like it's a low salary? The majority of us are going to earn less than that.
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    As a fully qualified accountant no, that's pretty bad.
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    (Original post by ياسمين)
    Of COURSE it's a good salary. It's way above the national average, why are people acting like it's a low salary? The majority of us are going to earn less than that.
    No, surely most people on here will be university educated and end up earning more than that eventually.
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    (Original post by joey11223)
    You'd be able to get a cleaner on £40k

    I'd love to have £40k and be single, £40k for me and a partner would still be great.

    I mean my mum earns like £32k before tax. Right now it's me, my mum and a friend living here(she pays £100 a week to cover food, bills, etc, we're not sure how much bills have gone up but it was an agreed thing with her family).

    We have sky+ tv downstairs, virgin media in my room with one of those landline and fast 20mb broadband packages. We used to have a cleaner once a week too, but now we're home more she's decided to stop doing that since I and my friend can do that and not have it cost what ever it was. We usually go abroad once a year, we aren't this summer but it's more there's no real time to do it, so instead we're having odd days out like going to london to visit museums and such. Yeah there's some home improvements we'd like done but we can;t really afford them at the moment but we live pretty darn comfortably in my opinion, I;d be happy to be able to have the kind of life style I have now and I'm older, so £30k would be fine for me by myself.

    I have no idea what kind of salary I'm going to end up with, since I haven't decided exactly what career I want, the options will be quite varied. Either a researcher, preferrably involved in arachnids, maybe with trips to exotic areas to study them or at an airport. Yeah it sounds odd but basically you get quite a few exotic animals illegally shipped over and the bigger airports have special rooms to keep and care for these animals until rescue centres can deal with them. Working in a place like that would be a dream job, yeah some say I'm not aiming high enough but it's a job that would make me happy. I'd imagine after a few years with a job like that I'd be on £25-30, probably get more as a researcher after enough years then the other job, unless my role becomes managerial.
    Lol, my dad earns about 50k and I always get the impression that we are really poor! But this is to support 6 people I suppose..
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    id be happy with 40k thats way above average and i dont think it would leave me in much financial difficulty
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    (Original post by Savahl)
    If we are talking wage over the span of my career then no. Nothing to do with "the lifestyle im used to", I grew up in a single parent family and my mum was on less than £20k. I went to a state school.
    But, I earn (roughly) that amount now, and I would be severly disappointed if this is the peak of my income as I would still like to be better off than I am now in terms of disposable income.
    I am hoping to get maybe £60k/pa - possibly more, on the agreement with my hubby that if we ever have kids he is the one to stay home and look after them.
    He will try everything in his power to not impregnate you in that case.
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    That statement bears little relation to your original statement, which was that 40k is 'not enough' for a family in London to live on.

    Most families in London live on less than that.

    Are they not really living?
    :rolleyes:

    Fine. 40k is not enough for me or my family. Happy?

    Sure you can live on less. It is just not very pleasant.
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    Yes it's pretty good but I'm hoping that after some years of working I'd be earning more than that.
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    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    No, surely most people on here will be university educated and end up earning more than that eventually.
    Would you say so? I read somewhere that graduates usually earn like £5,000 more than non-graduates. Which would be nearly hitting the 30k mark. But if so that's great I'm looking forward to graduating lol :p:
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    £40k, hmm I think that's around what my brother is on at the moment. Anyway I'd be happy to start on £30k, although since I'm likely to be re-entering the job market in 2011-12, then it would probably be more like £35k I guess. And certainly by 2015 I'd be very disapointed if I'm not on at least £40-45k, and would expect to be on at least £50-60k by 2020.

    As an aside, don't you find it odd that we are now about to enter the decade where thirty or fourty, heck maybe even twenty years ago it was thought that space travel would be commonplace? I just hope that I somehow manage to live long enough to see the first permanent mars, or at least lunar colony established. I've always fancied retiring to the Moon...
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    (Original post by Savahl)
    I am hoping to get maybe £60k/pa - possibly more, on the agreement with my hubby that if we ever have kids he is the one to stay home and look after them.

    Don't let him do that unless he has a job where he can work from home. The garden is what currently maintains my sanity, looking after the kids can be nice, but men are not designed to cope with the repetitive monotony of childcare and looking after the house. Why do you think that when left to our own devices we tend to live like slobs?

    Oh and you will need to pay for a cleaner, either that or spend your weekends cleaning...
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    (Original post by Stomm)
    Don't let him do that unless he has a job where he can work from home. The garden is what currently maintains my sanity, looking after the kids can be nice, but men are not designed to cope with the repetitive monotony of childcare and looking after the house. Why do you think that when left to our own devices we tend to live like slobs?

    Oh and you will need to pay for a cleaner, either that or spend your weekends cleaning...
    Lol we have already discussed this and he is a clean freak luckily. As it stands i earn twice what he does, and generally have more scope for higher earning than he does. Me staying at home is not feasible which he accepts that and is happy to be a house husband. (it was actually his suggestion lol)
    If he failed at keeping the house in order, I would just send him back to work and we would have to settle with childcare

    I was just on holiday for 2 weeks and both he, the dog, and the house survived so there is hope yet lol

    Lucky for both of us I am not a big fan of children and its not on my todo list
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    People vastly over-estimate the impact of money on happiness. Once you've got enough money that you're not struggling to live on a day-to-day basis (enough money for food, bills, somewhere ok but basic to live, stuff breaking, etc) then the impact of extra money on happiness is minimal.

    Not having enough money can make you stressed and unhappy, but having extra money beyond the basics doesn't make you extra happy.

    There's no point in doing a job you hate for more money, because the extra money isn't going to increase your happiness as much as finding a job you actually like.
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    (Original post by Feral Beast)
    Does anybody have a source or any stats site that tells you the percentiles of earnings in the UK?
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7581120.stm
    Salary per week not year though.
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    40k is great
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    (Original post by ToastyCoke)
    Most people on here are intolerably naive
    This! A few decades ago, if you were upper middle class and had a university education you might've been able to earn a salary twice the national average (such as the figure the OP has proposed) after a few years in the job. Today's job market however is completey different.
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    I guess I arrived at this thread pretty late, but I think I'll post this anyway.

    I don't think you can measure a particular salary against what is "good".

    I'd like to share something I picked up recently, it's in a book called Business Stripped Bare by Richard Branson:

    "...when we talk about success what are we really talking about? Are we talking about money? As a measure of success, money's a crude one at best....Money's only interesting for what it lets you do....Be generous in your interpretation of what success looks like....The best and most meaningful lives don't always end happily. In business, as in life, all that matters is you do something positive. Thanks for reading - and enjoy your life. You only get one."

    Young people are pretty deluded when it comes to financial success I think, until I began to think in more depth about it I was this crazy capitalist kid that was obsessed with becoming the richest businessman ever.

    It doesn't work like that.
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    (Original post by ttx)
    People vastly over-estimate the impact of money on happiness. Once you've got enough money that you're not struggling to live on a day-to-day basis (enough money for food, bills, somewhere ok but basic to live, stuff breaking, etc) then the impact of extra money on happiness is minimal.

    Not having enough money can make you stressed and unhappy, but having extra money beyond the basics doesn't make you extra happy.

    There's no point in doing a job you hate for more money, because the extra money isn't going to increase your happiness as much as finding a job you actually like.
    In an enormous thread, you are the only poster who seems to have their head screwed on. I'll try and remember to rep later.
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    Well as I want to be a Journalist so that amount would be ******* great. We generally start on 15k or so, and it isn't exactly the highest paid job in the world so it'd be hard to get higher than 30-40k I think. I'm in it for job satisfaction, not money though.
 
 
 
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