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    Hello guys,

    After a year long of discussions and confusions , i am sure many of us are heading for The Msc Management course at different business schools across UK and Europe.

    So lets discuss the career opportunities after this course thats gaining quite a momentum!!

    Any ideas what kind of jobs one could aim for. Since it is a Genertalist Management degree , what would be the scope for students.

    Any views are welcome!!!

    Buck up guys , the real game starts now!!!

    Rohan
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    hey Rohan!

    some of the field i thought might be on offer are: the city, banking and trading. consultancy. the accounting route. general management. international management. management in the financial sector too maybe.

    I'm really interested to hear from others, i was wondering what options there may be in the field of entrepreneurship and ventures.

    Since most of us heading to the MSc in management are from other fields, we will have allot of new opportunities open to us which we might not know exist!

    btw, which university did u decide on rohan?
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    i want to know as well!! Anyone know the job prospects for Msc Management Research at SBS?
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    (Original post by MrManager)
    hey Rohan!

    some of the field i thought might be on offer are: the city, banking and trading. consultancy. the accounting route. general management. international management. management in the financial sector too maybe.

    I'm really interested to hear from others, i was wondering what options there may be in the field of entrepreneurship and ventures.

    Since most of us heading to the MSc in management are from other fields, we will have allot of new opportunities open to us which we might not know exist!

    btw, which university did u decide on rohan?

    Hey ,

    I would be heading to Warwick Business School. i have decided to drop Imperial.

    Anyways hope u r progressing as desired with the schools

    Rohan
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    (Original post by germaineilya)
    i want to know as well!! Anyone know the job prospects for Msc Management Research at SBS?
    By SBS hope you mean , Said Business School at Oxford. The possibility are many because of the name oxford. But a research degree usually culminates with a DPhil . The person taking the research rout usually enters the field of academics. And of course if you ae from oxford , u would be a hell lot of a researcher:yes:

    But if u decide to stop at an Mphil stage itself , one can enter into the field of market research i beleiev and other areas that will usually involve research compoennet. Coz at the Mhil stage they do teach the methids of researching and all

    But academics forms the main area post the research degree.


    Any other inputs

    rohan
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    Guys ,

    I have also heard , that people witha generalist management degree really have to sell hemselves hard. Is that True!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    any inputs

    rohan
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    In short, your career prospects will be enhanced a little bit, but not much because you do not need a MSc managment for most of the jobs people with this degree go into (ie grad schemes in the city). It will show that you have learned about business by the end of the course, but not by the time of the all important interview stage.

    In my view 20-25 k is unbelievably expensive for a degree that is not essential to enhance a career, esp when people want work experience nowadays. When i asked the WBS careers advisor if this degree will help me get a job her words were 'errr well not exactly, if is purely up to you and your experience, but the brand name might help'. I.E not exactly what i wanted to hear for my 20k.

    BTW i have offers for the MSc Management at WBS and Imperial.

    I think i might look at the short executive and summer programmes at the top US Schools, which teach you all the same stuff in a condensed period for more than a third of the cost and no doubt look better on a CV with all their career guidance and field trips.
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    (Original post by rohan87)
    Guys ,

    I have also heard , that people witha generalist management degree really have to sell hemselves hard. Is that True!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    any inputs

    rohan
    yes it is quite hard to sell if you are not one of those who got a degree from a top business school and got 1-2 years of work experience(can be in the form of internship). Management is one of the most popular degree in UK and there are far more graduates as compare to no of available opportunities.Furthermore, it is not necessary to have a management degree for management trainee roles. People tend to specialise (Accounting/HR/Marketing etc) in order to stand out from the crowd.
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    To be quite honest, they're probably seen as a very good thing by those coming (typically from Asia) who don't have a British degree. After all, plenty of people spend £10-15k on fees alone -often more- and go home satisfied year on year. I've seen the makeup of two MSc, both in Marketing, at two respected business schools that charge internationals around 13k for the 26 week privilege, and they're nothing special. Infact, a couple of lecturers (one who is probably quite happy telling everyone how much of a sham the postgrad business degrees are, one a bit less so) are of the opinion most of the final year honours students can run rings round the international MSc students, and more is expected from them at undergrad level (infact one used this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Foundations-.../dp/007710918X for the first half of term one- and you'd assume most graduates should be beyond that by MSc level). I'd agree- it probably isn't essential if you want to use it in the UK- any employer that knows anything about it (I guess some programs will be better than others though) will probably know it doesn't teach you many skills that a good student won't have by the end of an undergrad management degree. To this end, it's not really surprising that in one of the above mentioned courses, 33 of the 35 enrolled students in 2007/8 were from outside the UK- the profit margin on the tuition must have been frightening.
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    To be quite honest, they're probably seen as a very good thing by those coming (typically from Asia) who don't have a British degree. After all, plenty of people spend £10-15k on fees alone -often more- and go home satisfied year on year. I've seen the makeup of two MSc, both in Marketing, at two respected business schools that charge internationals around 13k for the 26 week privilege, and they're nothing special. Infact, a couple of lecturers (one who is probably quite happy telling everyone how much of a sham the postgrad business degrees are, one a bit less so) are of the opinion most of the final year honours students can run rings round the international MSc students, and more is expected from them at undergrad level (infact one used this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Foundations-.../dp/007710918X for the first half of term one- and you'd assume most graduates should be beyond that by MSc level). I'd agree- it probably isn't essential if you want to use it in the UK- any employer that knows anything about it (I guess some programs will be better than others though) will probably know it doesn't teach you many skills that a good student won't have by the end of an undergrad management degree. To this end, it's not really surprising that in one of the above mentioned courses, 33 of the 35 enrolled students in 2007/8 were from outside the UK- the profit margin on the tuition must have been frightening.
    You are quite right. When looking at WBS and their alum pictures, 80% were foreign students and even the reps there had a poor grasp of English. I must say that it felt like the odd one out when i was there and that i had missed something. These courses are great for rich foreign students who want a british degree to take back home, but if you already have a degree from a top uk uni then it doesn't seem worth it.

    Just my 2 cents.
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    Hmm thats a perspective people have given in.

    But if this degree was so useless why top schools like the LBS , Imperial , Kings , Edinburgh , Warwick seem to have started it, and why is there immense curiosity amongst students to know about these opportunities. It must have something ti it , other than being merely a fascination of rich foriegn student. Coz No student however rich is stupid to pay 30K for a degre that wont give him anything. The french schools are on the forefront of these degree. There is not a single decent school in Europe HEC , EMLYON , IE , Bocconi , St Gallent included that doeasnt promote these courses. It cant be just financial is it, there must have been success stories of students that might have generated the intrest of other students to go in for the course. If others were not gaining something out of it and it was just a means to generate income , it would have fallen down in general opinion. But that does not seem to be the case.

    Even Financial times has got prominent rankings for these course , unlike some other specialised areas. So there must be some view in favour of these degree.

    Regarding the job being accesible to all the business studies undergrad students. Dont u all know that 3/4 of selected candidates have a post graduate degree. This holdes for all companies including the like of Accenture , Deloitte , HSBC , Llyods , UBS among others.

    If any doubt read the Charted Management Institute perspective on these Masters both at an Msc and MBA level . That will help a lot in clearing the doubts one must have , thats pretty obvious for any student.
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    (Original post by moneymakesworry)
    yes it is quite hard to sell if you are not one of those who got a degree from a top business school and got 1-2 years of work experience(can be in the form of internship). Management is one of the most popular degree in UK and there are far more graduates as compare to no of available opportunities.Furthermore, it is not necessary to have a management degree for management trainee roles. People tend to specialise (Accounting/HR/Marketing etc) in order to stand out from the crowd.

    Thats true , a specialist degree will helo u stand u out. But wont that devrease the portability factor of any graduate. As in you are a marketing ppost grad , and your option will be more or less focused around Marketing and other areas. Will it not?
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    (Original post by AfghanistanBananistan)
    In short, your career prospects will be enhanced a little bit, but not much because you do not need a MSc managment for most of the jobs people with this degree go into (ie grad schemes in the city). It will show that you have learned about business by the end of the course, but not by the time of the all important interview stage.

    In my view 20-25 k is unbelievably expensive for a degree that is not essential to enhance a career, esp when people want work experience nowadays. When i asked the WBS careers advisor if this degree will help me get a job her words were 'errr well not exactly, if is purely up to you and your experience, but the brand name might help'. I.E not exactly what i wanted to hear for my 20k.

    BTW i have offers for the MSc Management at WBS and Imperial.

    I think i might look at the short executive and summer programmes at the top US Schools, which teach you all the same stuff in a condensed period for more than a third of the cost and no doubt look better on a CV with all their career guidance and field trips.

    Thats a strange thing comong from you i believe , since not much time ago you looked like a prospective MSc Student. Anyways opinions change and there might be some very valiod reason for it.

    What carrer counsellor said was not surprising at all . Coz of all the people i have intercated at both WBS and Imperial who were not from Managemnt areas said a common view: Degree is a base you get based on which you have to sell yourself. Companys dont see a degree name and University name and take you in. The recruitment process are extensive.

    Before each application you make u will be asked the reason for applyig for a particular post. If u justify that u will be called. In cases a post grad will be an added benefot. People will prefer a post grad in front of Undrgrad. Thats a known fact. I have seen Marketing guys from LSE struggle hard to get a job at big firms like PwC as they were not able to clear the aptitute tests. You need to sell urself and ur prospects will depend upon how good you are at marketing yourself.

    Rest is upyo you.

    Regarding the summer school thing , if you have money to give , GO. My cousin went to Standford for a summer course on Management. He studied the subjects all right. Tough the experiecen was great , but the certificate didnt really help him.
    I dont know much abt Executive graduates , but will help only if you have extensive work experiecen.

    Certificates or Diplomas dont really match upto a degree. But the resu is youor opinon.

    Thanx a lot for sharing your perspective though
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    Any other coments guys!!!
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    I'm not sure if i share the same views as those previously given, for one, i know that business and management students aren't allowed to do the msc course, because it's a conversion course, so the fact that you would not learn anything extra in the msc isn't relevant.. and also, if a lecturer thinks that a final yr student in undergrad is at a higher stage of understanding, skills, and requirements than an msc student, he should be doing something about it!!, because the courses should try to make them reach the same level by the end!! i hope i don't end up in a department with this type of professors!! i wish i knew which uni this was!

    To some extent though, i must agree, the msc is pretty general and many ppl study management in the uk. however i would like to believe that it gives a valuable base and business understanding to non-business students. we could argue that work experience is important, however at the end of the day, an employer doesn't really care about ur overall undertaking of things, and as long as ur good in ur specialty and do the job for him, u may spend 10 years at work, and not learn much outside the scope of ur job. so i guess if someone has the aim of one day being his own business man, he will have to mix education, with business experience, as well as self education and research.

    I hope that I am not being biased, and would like to hear other opinions about the course. I also realize that universities in the UK are sometimes only concerned with profits rather than educating or helping students, and are run as businesses themselves. so whether they offer the course or not, wouldn't make me trust that they have our best interests at heart!!

    Does anyone else have ideas of msc destinations? and also, could u plz state the names of the uni's that u are talking about, when u mention weaknesses such as bad english, so that we may know where not to go
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    (Original post by AfghanistanBananistan)
    In short, your career prospects will be enhanced a little bit, but not much because you do not need a MSc managment for most of the jobs people with this degree go into (ie grad schemes in the city). It will show that you have learned about business by the end of the course, but not by the time of the all important interview stage.
    This is true. I managed to secure a pretty illustrious graduate post at a well known management consultancy without a Masters. Of the cohort who started with me, I would say that only 20-30% had masters qualifications - of these, the majority had a masters in humanities/sciences as oppose to management. This was in 2007.

    When I was applying for a Masters a few months ago, I was less interested in the 'vanilla' offerings out there - an MSc in Management from the University of X didn't appeal to me as much as some of the more varied courses available. Hence, I applied to Management and Organisational Analysis at WBS, and Management, Organisations and Governance at LSE - rather than applying for straight Management. I received and turned down offers from both, choosing instead, a course at Cambridge which was more in tune with my background/interests and gives me the opportunity to pursue a PhD if I so wish.

    Anywho, back to the topic. I do not think that graduates from UK universities would be well served by an MSc in Management. Those from abroad with desires to find work in the UK however, would probably find that the course would open a lot more doors for them (in terms of UK employment) than just a BSc from their country of origin.

    My 2 cents.
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    (Original post by MrManager)
    Does anyone else have ideas of msc destinations? and also, could u plz state the names of the uni's that u are talking about, when u mention weaknesses such as bad english, so that we may know where not to go
    When I went for a management open day at imperial, the students (prospective and current) seemed to have a good grasp of English.
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    (Original post by MrManager)
    I'm not sure if i share the same views as those previously given, for one, i know that business and management students aren't allowed to do the msc course, because it's a conversion course, so the fact that you would not learn anything extra in the msc isn't relevant.. and also, if a lecturer thinks that a final yr student in undergrad is at a higher stage of understanding, skills, and requirements than an msc student, he should be doing something about it!!, because the courses should try to make them reach the same level by the end!! i hope i don't end up in a department with this type of professors!! i wish i knew which uni this was!

    To some extent though, i must agree, the msc is pretty general and many ppl study management in the uk. however i would like to believe that it gives a valuable base and business understanding to non-business students. we could argue that work experience is important, however at the end of the day, an employer doesn't really care about ur overall undertaking of things, and as long as ur good in ur specialty and do the job for him, u may spend 10 years at work, and not learn much outside the scope of ur job. so i guess if someone has the aim of one day being his own business man, he will have to mix education, with business experience, as well as self education and research.

    I hope that I am not being biased, and would like to hear other opinions about the course. I also realize that universities in the UK are sometimes only concerned with profits rather than educating or helping students, and are run as businesses themselves. so whether they offer the course or not, wouldn't make me trust that they have our best interests at heart!!

    Does anyone else have ideas of msc destinations? and also, could u plz state the names of the uni's that u are talking about, when u mention weaknesses such as bad english, so that we may know where not to go
    You're quite wrong. Some MScs are designed for those who have never taken a business degree, some are. It really depends- Cambridge offer a two year MPhil which caters for those who are new to the game, Glasgow offers an MSc in Management and IT for those who haven't taken a business degree. Some of the intensive strategic marketing courses though, are very much aimed at business graduates, by and large.

    Secondly, staff in some departments aren't really in a position to speak out that the course is little more than a money spinner- it'd put their careers in jeapordy if they (especially junior staff) were to speak out against a course which made the university so much money. Raising the bar might all be well and good, but if they're making 10k a person clear profit every year from international students and they're having to fail 3/4 of them- it isn't good for the department's reputation among the internationals. Sad as it may be, most just want the degree so they can triple their earning potential back in their home countries (since 90% are international students)- developing skills that employers here want isn't necessarily what the students want. A few years of failing everyone because they deliberately want to be tough might be the way they should do things, but if it cuts the revenue to a department by £500,000 a year, then 10 staff lose their jobs. Not really surprising the status quo prevails, is it?

    Of course, its not all this bad- the worst still get failed, and I've seen a paper failed in one of these MScs, and it was horrendous. However, I've seen pretty poor ones scrape passes though, just because it keeps everyone relatively happy. From what I've seen, if you're going to undertake a relatively general MSc that the university uses to teach mainly international students on high fees, don't expect to have to do a great deal to pass, or for employers in the UK to look on it that favourably. This isn't saying they wont expect a lot in order to get top grades, anecdotally I think they do, but they're under a lot of pressure to keep generating the money from these type of courses in order to keep staff in jobs.

    And as for where these departments are- all I will say is they are neither of the universities I have studied at, and they certainy aren't mickey mouse MScs at universities which have sprang up recently either.
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    Hi Guys,

    Firstly, this is a very helpful thread for me as I have confirmed my place at Cambridge to undertake Mphil in Management. The tuition fees for this course including the college fees are over 14k pounds and reading this I am not convinced it is worth it...

    I am an international student but not particularly wealthy one - I could obviously get the money together but it definitely would not be easy for me....

    When applying to Msc Management courses, I did so with the intention to learn as much as possible and expected a demanding environment - especially from the likes of Cambridge...

    However, I am in doubt now whether it makes sense for me to take on the place as I would hate to be stuck with a mediocore class/teaching and throw away my money for a 9 month holiday degree in the UK.

    I would really appreciate your comments - do you suppose the course at Cambridge should be worth it (or is this not relevant given the financial benefits for the university), or should I just give up, attempt to secure a decent job and do an MBA later on instead...

    thanks a lot,

    t.
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    0404343m, i only meant that from my own personal knowledge, all (MSc management) courses have a similar programme structure, and admit only ppl with no previous business or management education, and no more than 2 years relevant work experience. I wasn't talking about different courses such as Mphil or management with IT, I wouldn't know about those..

    anyways, I respect your opinions and you all seem to have gained them from experience. but shouldn't someone reading this take it with a pinch of salt.. some of you have not actually tried taking the course, and I have spoken to a few alumni i know who said the course was extremely rigorous (at imperial for eg.). Also personally, even though 2007 was only 2 years ago, but to me, it feels very very different, maybe because of the economic situation, but lately employability has radically changed, and so did admissions into business school. whilst people were being admitted into imperial and cass with 2:2's. now they have become far more competitive.

    Could you guys please give me ur ideas on which not so general courses in management, for those who have not studied business in their undergrad, that you might see as being better options to look at?:o:

    I am not an international student. and i assume many international students looking at the Msc who are on this thread are also, like me interested in pursuing a career in the uk after graduation, rather than going back home.

    another thing worth mentioning, i think there is a reason why the general management course is so popular, for it perfectly suits non-business undergrads. also people aren't sure what they specifically want. so they work in a few jobs afterwards, and once they know what they like, work usually teaches you about specialization pretty well and is hands on, general knowledge not so much. so it would make sense to study something general at postgrad, and learn about specific areas through work.?.. just discussing

    this is a great thread! we all seem to have different opinions to give
 
 
 
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