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    (Original post by thomass)
    Hi Guys,

    Firstly, this is a very helpful thread for me as I have confirmed my place at Cambridge to undertake Mphil in Management. The tuition fees for this course including the college fees are over 14k pounds and reading this I am not convinced it is worth it...

    I am an international student but not particularly wealthy one - I could obviously get the money together but it definitely would not be easy for me....

    When applying to Msc Management courses, I did so with the intention to learn as much as possible and expected a demanding environment - especially from the likes of Cambridge...

    However, I am in doubt now whether it makes sense for me to take on the place as I would hate to be stuck with a mediocore class/teaching and throw away my money for a 9 month holiday degree in the UK.

    I would really appreciate your comments - do you suppose the course at Cambridge should be worth it (or is this not relevant given the financial benefits for the university), or should I just give up, attempt to secure a decent job and do an MBA later on instead...

    thanks a lot,

    t.
    In my view, you should go ahead with the MPhil course only if you are struggling to find a job or want a career change otherwise MBA from a top business school is a far better choice.

    Cambridge is one of the strongest brands in the world and definitely you will get the interview calls purely on the basis of the name. After looking at the course contents of Mhil, I doubt it is as demanding as their MBA is.


    By the way I am also in a similar situation and got offers from LSE and Cambridge. only difference is you are free to make choice and I got a family pressure to join one of them.
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    (Original post by rohan87)
    Thats true , a specialist degree will helo u stand u out. But wont that devrease the portability factor of any graduate. As in you are a marketing ppost grad , and your option will be more or less focused around Marketing and other areas. Will it not?
    Not sure if you are competing for a specialist role. Yes diverse range of course will give you slight edge as compared to non business graduate for a typical management trainee roles.
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    Well this thread reallyhas raised a lot of issues. We all have loyalty towards the courses we have chosen and the universities we have decided to go. Some take it with an open mind some with unrealised reservation .

    Anyways what is this question about Intenrational students and local students. People come to do a course from varied backgrounds , and it is the diversity of thoughts , attitudes , views and cultures that attract most of the student to pursue an International degree. Other wise whats the advantage of studying abroad. If you want a course u can get i back at home. Going International is the result of desire to brak pout of ones shell and experience the world in its diversity. Thats purely from a students perspective,

    No matter whoch degree you take , it is at the end of day your skill that counts.
    And regarding the working in UK thing. UK is not the only contry in the world where all the people go and work or that is the ultimate ambition of all those who go for a post grad degree. I believe UK offers some of the finest opportunities at work that is very respectable and worth everybodys regard.

    But in the current scenario its in the developing world and emerging economies of Brazil , Russia , India , China and others that provides more challenging opportunities for students world wide.

    So lets not get into the nitti gritties of the importance of the degree , as every one has thougt out well before taking a plunge. Lets talk of the options that one can realise post this degree.

    Any comments guys.
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    (Original post by thomass)
    Hi Guys,

    Firstly, this is a very helpful thread for me as I have confirmed my place at Cambridge to undertake Mphil in Management. The tuition fees for this course including the college fees are over 14k pounds and reading this I am not convinced it is worth it...

    I am an international student but not particularly wealthy one - I could obviously get the money together but it definitely would not be easy for me....

    When applying to Msc Management courses, I did so with the intention to learn as much as possible and expected a demanding environment - especially from the likes of Cambridge...

    However, I am in doubt now whether it makes sense for me to take on the place as I would hate to be stuck with a mediocore class/teaching and throw away my money for a 9 month holiday degree in the UK.

    I would really appreciate your comments - do you suppose the course at Cambridge should be worth it (or is this not relevant given the financial benefits for the university), or should I just give up, attempt to secure a decent job and do an MBA later on instead...

    thanks a lot,

    t.
    Hey , how r u thomass. hope u dong great?? By the way why i havent i heard from you in these past many days. Got busy with Cambridge i guess..

    Best of luck,

    Rohan
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    (Original post by thomass)
    Hi Guys,

    Firstly, this is a very helpful thread for me as I have confirmed my place at Cambridge to undertake Mphil in Management. The tuition fees for this course including the college fees are over 14k pounds and reading this I am not convinced it is worth it...

    I am an international student but not particularly wealthy one - I could obviously get the money together but it definitely would not be easy for me....

    When applying to Msc Management courses, I did so with the intention to learn as much as possible and expected a demanding environment - especially from the likes of Cambridge...

    However, I am in doubt now whether it makes sense for me to take on the place as I would hate to be stuck with a mediocore class/teaching and throw away my money for a 9 month holiday degree in the UK.

    I would really appreciate your comments - do you suppose the course at Cambridge should be worth it (or is this not relevant given the financial benefits for the university), or should I just give up, attempt to secure a decent job and do an MBA later on instead...

    thanks a lot,

    t.
    First off congrats on the offer!

    I think your doubts are fair as the value of the MIM degree has yet to be proven. It is relatively new in the UK and does not carry the same prestige as it does in countries like France.

    I too was in a similar situation to you and carried an offer for MIM at LSE. It’s a 2 year course and the fees alone would have been £ 36,000. Considering the cost of London, it would have cost me some £50-60k at the end – a fee which my mind could not justify paying. In the end I opted for a completely different course, coincidently at Cambridge too, but for 1/5th the cost.

    The strength with Cambridge is its brand name, which if you come from a less prestigious university can do wonders to you when applying for jobs. Unless you feel you can gain work experience that will allow you to pursue a top MBA later, I would definitely go ahead with the MIM. At £12k the price is quite hefty, but with starting salaries around £30-35k in London, it is an investment that quickly pays off. I think the degree is far from “throwing away money” that you mentioned. You will be surrounded by exceptional individuals (that may well lead to job connections), and I suspect the course won’t be a holiday – we’re talking Cambridge after all!

    Anyhow, have you contacted current students or alumni of the course? I think they will probably be able to give you a better insight on the course and job prospects than anybody here.

    Good luck on your decision!
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    (Original post by thomass)
    Hi Guys,

    Firstly, this is a very helpful thread for me as I have confirmed my place at Cambridge to undertake Mphil in Management. The tuition fees for this course including the college fees are over 14k pounds and reading this I am not convinced it is worth it...

    I am an international student but not particularly wealthy one - I could obviously get the money together but it definitely would not be easy for me....

    When applying to Msc Management courses, I did so with the intention to learn as much as possible and expected a demanding environment - especially from the likes of Cambridge...

    However, I am in doubt now whether it makes sense for me to take on the place as I would hate to be stuck with a mediocore class/teaching and throw away my money for a 9 month holiday degree in the UK.

    I would really appreciate your comments - do you suppose the course at Cambridge should be worth it (or is this not relevant given the financial benefits for the university), or should I just give up, attempt to secure a decent job and do an MBA later on instead...

    thanks a lot,

    t.
    I'd definitely echo the advice given by Aemilius. The Mphil at Cambridge is, by my understanding, a very thorough and academically rigorous course. There will be much to gain from it. Add to that, the Cambridge brand name - which is on par with the Ivys in the US, and you're on to a winner.
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    Lol. I'm about to start the 2 year (3 if I go for the awesome sandwich placement) HEC MSc in Management in Paris (#1 in Europe according to the FT) and I think there's a lot of rubbish on this thread - I'm not the least bit worried about my career prospects, which seem absolutely excellent : http://www.hec.edu/Grande-Ecole

    Employment:
    Annual survey of the HEC MSc in Management class of 2007, just after graduation:

    * Average salary in France: 48,546€ (77,131 US$*)
    * Average salary abroad: 68,557€ (100,951 US$*)
    * Length of time taken to find employment:
    o 91.5%: within 3 months after graduation
    o 4,3% : 4-5 months
    o 2.5 % : after 6 months
    o 1.7% : did not respond
    * * Currency rate, July 2008.
    Plus, last I checked, over half the graduating class have jobs before they leave the school !

    Don't forget my international friends, UK students are extremely biased against graduate courses ; in the rest of the world, many companies expect an MSc. Then again, perhaps the same degree from Imperial wouldn't make me quite as happy... And I've heard bad things about the Cambridge MSc (basically, that the degree sucked, from a guy on the programme - but he wasn't talking about the career opps).
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    (Original post by Aemilius)
    First off congrats on the offer!

    I think your doubts are fair as the value of the MIM degree has yet to be proven. It is relatively new in the UK and does not carry the same prestige as it does in countries like France.

    I too was in a similar situation to you and carried an offer for MIM at LSE. It’s a 2 year course and the fees alone would have been £ 36,000. Considering the cost of London, it would have cost me some £50-60k at the end – a fee which my mind could not justify paying. In the end I opted for a completely different course, coincidently at Cambridge too, but for 1/5th the cost.

    The strength with Cambridge is its brand name, which if you come from a less prestigious university can do wonders to you when applying for jobs. Unless you feel you can gain work experience that will allow you to pursue a top MBA later, I would definitely go ahead with the MIM. At £12k the price is quite hefty, but with starting salaries around £30-35k in London, it is an investment that quickly pays off. I think the degree is far from “throwing away money” that you mentioned. You will be surrounded by exceptional individuals (that may well lead to job connections), and I suspect the course won’t be a holiday – we’re talking Cambridge after all!

    Anyhow, have you contacted current students or alumni of the course? I think they will probably be able to give you a better insight on the course and job prospects than anybody here.

    Good luck on your decision!
    I had an offer for the LSE MiM, which I very nearly took. LSE MScs are pricy but excellent, and this one ranks beautifully. Not to mention, the mandatory internships, company workshops etc. make it a very employable degree.
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    Hi Chaps,

    I'd say current students would be my first port of call, or I've found that calling up the careers department of the uni helpful too. Firstly they can put you in contact with current students, they seem to know the student body way better than admissions.

    Also they're the ones who one day may help point you in the direction of companies with internships/jobs so you could ask them what the stats are currently for placing their MIM students this year? You could even pretend to be a potential employer, in case they don't expose the whole truth about how many students they're placing in various industries.

    Here's quite a good story of someone who's made the decision to quit a well paid job at JP Morgan to start an MBA course at Imperial - Obviously he things it's a career move in the right direction. http://www.businessbecause.com/jp-mo...usiness-school

    Cherry
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    I secured a 2:1 from Aston in Business and Management, and in that course I specialised in Organisational Behaviour and Law. By the end of my course I was enjoying the Organisational Behaviour side of it, and thus decided to continue this subject at MSc.

    I think issues tend to be simplified in a very much black/white way by students on TSR wishing to demonstrate their point. The way I see it is that your undergrad degree is the most important; failing to get a 2:1 in that will not be recovered by a masters in employer's eyes. However when talking about layering a MSc degree on top of your undergrad which explores an aspect of your BSc in more depth, of course it is worthwhile and increases employability.

    If you did Management at undergrad, I would suggest at least trying to get a little more specific with your masters. As previously mentioned, the plain management MSc's are often akin to cramming a 3 year undergrad course into 1 year. Due to the amount of content covered I'd assume the depth and difficulty wouldn't increase to the extent it would if you specified your topic a little more. Consequently coming from a business background, you wouldn't be getting the most out of your studies
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    Well, after going through the thread, i find that very few of the opionions are from people who have actually completed an Msc/Mphil in management. everyone has his own interests and every course has its own advantages..

    Firstly, i dont agree that Msc management courses are of inferior quality run only to churn money into the department. As most of you are aware, AMBA accredits the Msc courses too. So, rest assured, for those going to the accredited programs need not worry about programme structure or quality.


    The fact that undergrads may know more than the Msc Management grads might be correct. But the difference is the Brand name of the university. Isnt it true that oxbridge/ lse grads from almost any discipline are prefered for jobs in IB/consultancy over the grads of other universities?

    I would like to add another point here.. The current economic slowdown has changed the recruitment statistics. I know a student from LSE's MIM who couldnt even secure an internship ( LSE has complusory internship right? but it isnt easy to get) and had to come back to india and do an internship here and go back to complete the course.

    My conviction is that, any degree is as good as you make it to be. It depends on the individual. what you take from the course matters.Since management is a very vast field, we cannot pin point on a single course / degree to get into respectable jobs. So, a specialist degree or general degree will not make any impact in the long run.
    Come on guys, its our aspirations which count. eg. Infosys was started by IIT graduates and is one of the leading IT solutions companies in india and the world.
    Now, how many IIM grads could start a company like infy? very very few right?
    ( IIT is the best in india for engineering education while IIM is the best for management eductation).
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    (Original post by bhatsunil)
    Well, after going through the thread, i find that very few of the opionions are from people who have actually completed an Msc/Mphil in management. everyone has his own interests and every course has its own advantages..
    for
    Firstly, i dont agree that Msc management courses are of inferior quality run only to churn money into the department. As most of you are aware, AMBA accredits the Msc courses too. So, rest assured, for those going to the accredited programs need not worry about programme structure or quality.


    The fact that undergrads may know more than the Msc Management grads might be correct. But the difference is the Brand name of the university. Isnt it true that oxbridge/ lse grads from almost any discipline are prefered for jobs in IB/consultancy over the grads of other universities?

    I would like to add another point here.. The current economic slowdown has changed the recruitment statistics. I know a student from LSE's MIM who couldnt even secure an internship ( LSE has complusory internship right? but it isnt easy to get) and had to come back to india and do an internship here and go back to complete the course.

    My conviction is that, any degree is as good as you make it to be. It depends on the individual. what you take from the course matters.Since management is a very vast field, we cannot pin point on a single course / degree to get into respectable jobs. So, a specialist degree or general degree will not make any impact in the long run.
    Come on guys, its our aspirations which count. eg. Infosys was started by IIT graduates and is one of the leading IT solutions companies in india and the world.
    Now, how many IIM grads could start a company like infy? very very few right?
    ( IIT is the best in india for engineering education while IIM is the best for management eductation).
    If the degree does not matter, but our aspirations is the most important (as you state), then why do you suggest an IIT grad is more suitable for entrepreneurship than an IIM grad? In this, you do in fact suggest that the degree you take is important. I, for one, do not think an IIM grad is any less suitable for this as you seem to suggest. Grads from Business schools around the world have created many successful international companies.

    Also, the beauty and strength of the MIM is that you combine it with your previous degree (much like an MBA). So an engineering undergrad from, let's say, imperial, who then undertakes an MIM postgrad course, I'd say is much more likley to be successful in venturing a tech-startup than one without the degree (as he will have a better understanding of the business world). This is not to say that attending business school is essential in this, but I do believe it can make a difference if you use it wisley.

    I do agree with you, though, that ones induvidal strengths and what you choose to make of the course is very important (if not the most important). Hence, the reason why some students will go on to be more successful than others (in whatever way you choose to defy success).
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    (Original post by Aemilius)
    If the degree does not matter, but our aspirations is the most important (as you state), then why do you suggest an IIT grad is more suitable for entrepreneurship than an IIM grad? In this, you do in fact suggest that the degree you take is important. I, for one, do not think an IIM grad is any less suitable for this as you seem to suggest. Grads from Business schools around the world have created many successful international companies.
    You misunderstood what I said. I never suggested anyone to go to IIT to be an entreprenuer .. I just stated it as an example in support of my claim that degree is not the only deciding factor....
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    hey!I am Arshad.I have completed my undergraduation from Anna University(College of Engineering,Guindy) this year in Electronics and Communication.Its in Chennai(INdia) .I wanted to do Msc in Management or INternational Management in UK or Europe.So i have shortlisted a few Universities...

    City University:Cass
    Bristol University
    Strathclyde University
    Lancaster University
    Bath University
    Grenoble Graduate School of Business,France
    Aston Business School

    For me its not the place but the university that matters..I have not considered LSE, Warwick or Imperial coz i dont think I am that good to get in those Universities.I wanted to know as to how a good course is Msc Management in these Universities..I wanted to this course to get into the management side.After which i would like get a few years of work experience and then do a good MBA.

    As these universities have a very high fee structure I will taking an educational loan to study.So getting a good job is a very important factor for me to decide.So please help me out to decide if this course is good and which of the above places should i consider .If there are other Universities that are good too then please tell that too..Im thinking of doing the course in Sept 2010..And ill have to start applying in a few months..So please let me know about the job prospectus...
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    (Original post by rohan87)
    Hey , how r u thomass. hope u dong great?? By the way why i havent i heard from you in these past many days. Got busy with Cambridge i guess..

    Best of luck,

    Rohan
    halo rohan..im arshad...could you please help me out with this msc management thing...
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    I got feedback from someone on the MSc Management at Wawick that the participant mix (Nationality and (academic) Quality) is weak/low.
    Also too many students (over 100 in 2009).
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    hey there,,

    ive completed my bachelors in business administration,and now lukn to do an msc in international marketing management.

    ive applied to the universities like leicester,bradford,kent,essex and robert gordan..
    can anyone refer me with its scope particularly with the unversities.
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    Is there anyone going to UCL for management course? Would this course be less reputable compared with other unis offering the same course?
 
 
 
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