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    Hey guys, simple question, but for some reason its just flown out of my head. I've been having driving lessons at a tutoring company on their private road system, and today is my lesson on the actual roads.

    When approaching a T junction, for example, I would slow down on approach, brake and clutch, change down to 1st gear, then get the biting point on the clutch and be ready to take my foot off the brake and onto the gas. Just a reminder...you shouldn't do this in 2nd gear right?
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    (Original post by Moopet_431)
    Hey guys, simple question, but for some reason its just flown out of my head. I've been having driving lessons at a tutoring company on their private road system, and today is my lesson on the actual roads.

    When approaching a T junction, for example, I would slow down on approach, brake and clutch, change down to 1st gear, then get the biting point on the clutch and be ready to take my foot off the brake and onto the gas. Just a reminder...you shouldn't do this in 2nd gear right?
    If you're coming to a complete stop you will always need to move off in first gear. If you're going to be stopped for an unknown amount of time, put your handbrake on and return to neutral.

    Just a little note: Don't try and get to the biting point of the clutch when your other foot is on the brake and you have no intention on moving off. Two reasons: Unnecessary clutch wear, and also a high chance of stalling.

    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by Moopet_431)
    Hey guys, simple question, but for some reason its just flown out of my head. I've been having driving lessons at a tutoring company on their private road system, and today is my lesson on the actual roads.

    When approaching a T junction, for example, I would slow down on approach, brake and clutch, change down to 1st gear, then get the biting point on the clutch and be ready to take my foot off the brake and onto the gas. Just a reminder...you shouldn't do this in 2nd gear right?
    If you are stopped then go in first gear. If you are still rolling with some momentum then you can go in second.
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    if ur moving downhill you can be a gear 2 straight away. The hill has to be pretty steep though.
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    yes use the handbrake if you're stopping for a while and sit in neutral, but be prepared to change to first gear

    if its only a brief stop then do as you say.

    EDIT: and as theye above posts say if youre still moving/rolling or are downhill then you go into second gear
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    (Original post by Moopet_431)
    When approaching a T junction, for example, I would slow down on approach, brake and clutch, change down to 1st gear, then get the biting point on the clutch and be ready to take my foot off the brake and onto the gas. Just a reminder...you shouldn't do this in 2nd gear right?
    Oh dear. Depending on the gradient, you'd better reverse the order of the bit in bold. Once you've reached minimum speed and are prepared to go, use RIGHT foot first.. off the brake, onto the gas, THEN get the biting point on the clutch.

    Regarding the handbrake, use this when a "pause" becomes a "wait".

    It may be worth mentioning to ask your instructor the difference between a STOP and a GIVE WAY too.
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    (Original post by Ghost)
    If you're coming to a complete stop you will always need to move off in first gear.
    Depends on the vehicle and the gradiant, actually.
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    (Original post by rockyone2)
    if ur moving downhill you can be a gear 2 straight away. The hill has to be pretty steep though.
    Please ignore this.
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    (Original post by JC.)
    Depends on the vehicle and the gradiant, actually.
    Very true. I was just trying to give a 'test standard' answer though - I wouldn't want to give advice that could complicate matters and maybe lead to an issuing of a minor on the test day if the examiner goes strictly by the book.
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    (Original post by Elementric)
    Please ignore this.
    What are you talking bout if ur moving off downhill you go into second not 1st. As JC said the gear depends on gradient of the hill. U FOOL
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    It's not exactly hard to pull away in second (or even third) if you have any decent feel of the car and remotely reasonable clutch control. The only time I ever really feel like I need first is on an upward gradient.
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    If you forget to change out of second it is no biggie, I mean I have pulled away from a junction in third (tired, forgot to change down after stopping) and it isn't that hard, it's just a big slow and shakey but pulling away in second is very easy if you have any amount of clutch control.
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    what everybody has said is pretty much right - so i'm not going to bother saying anything else - but you say you're driving on private roads, does that mean you're 16? if so what's the point just wait until you are 17 and take real driving lessons. Driving on an empty road is nothing compared to learning in traffic - the controls of a car take anywhere between 1-3 lessons to learn, the learning begins once you start driving in traffic (or when you pass your test).
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    The gear you use depends on the speed.

    Starting from a standstill = first gear.
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    what everybody has said is pretty much right - so i'm not going to bother saying anything else - but you say you're driving on private roads, does that mean you're 16? if so what's the point just wait until you are 17 and take real driving lessons. Driving on an empty road is nothing compared to learning in traffic - the controls of a car take anywhere between 1-3 lessons to learn, the learning begins once you start driving in traffic (or when you pass your test).
    I started learning a few weeks before my 17th birthday at a Driving School that has its own road complex on private land. I though it was easier to learn the basics there, then when I was 17 move onto actual roads. There were quite a few learners on the complex, so you still got traffic to deal with, but in my eyes it was easier starting with less traffic, then moving up to the real roads. And thanks for the advice guys, all worked out and I got through the lesson better than I expected
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    (Original post by Elementric)
    Please ignore this.
    Why?

    (Original post by Ghost)
    I wouldn't want to give advice that could complicate matters and maybe lead to an issuing of a minor on the test day if the examiner goes strictly by the book.
    The "book" is surprisingly flexible, as is the examiner. If you use 2nd gear correctly, it won't even be a fault.

    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    The gear you use depends on the speed.
    and the power required. RTFM.
 
 
 
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