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    Hello, I'm hoping to take up rowing at uni at a novice level and just wanted some advice about training up for it.

    I've got a good general fitness already but obviously rowing is bloody tough so I'll get that up with cardio - is HIIT important or is it more endurance?

    It's my strength that's the problem, though, I'm a weakling :o:

    Could any knowledgeable rowers/gym people advise me on what weights/exercises I need to be doing and how many reps?

    I know 7 weeks isn't much time but I went and got bloody swine flu for two weeks and then went on holiday for another two. Good times. I thought I would at least try though!

    Your help is greatly appreciated!
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    I am in the same position as the OP, coming from a background of triathlon with some circuits and weights thrown in there, advice much appreciated!
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    you'll be training literally everyday at uni if you commit to it, and if you get good probably twice a day. so you'll be brought up to a good level of fitness there very quickly. i would personally just keep your general fitness up, and spend the summer relaxing/socialising with friends. but if you want to train.

    for the moment, i would increase your endurance by doing 2x30min ergs with a 2 minute break between them

    also doing 1min, 2min, 4min, 6min, 8min, 6min, 4min, 2min, 1min. on the erg, completely flat out (resting for the same amount of time between each sprint. its a good thing to do with someone else)

    and then well squats are the most important thing to do weights wise, but deadlifts, benchpulls etc are all very usefull too.
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    (Original post by didgeridoo12uk)
    you'll be training literally everyday at uni if you commit to it, and if you get good probably twice a day. so you'll be brought up to a good level of fitness there very quickly. i would personally just keep your general fitness up, and spend the summer relaxing/socialising with friends. but if you want to train.

    for the moment, i would increase your endurance by doing 2x30min ergs with a 2 minute break between them

    also doing 1min, 2min, 4min, 6min, 8min, 6min, 4min, 2min, 1min. on the erg, completely flat out (resting for the same amount of time between each sprint. its a good thing to do with someone else)

    and then well squats are the most important thing to do weights wise, but deadlifts, benchpulls etc are all very usefull too.
    Thanks man. What does the training at uni typically look like? Is it more intervals or more tempo style workouts?

    I don't have access to a rower so I'll have to make do with swimming, cycling and running. My lifting routine consists of 5x5s, 7x1s and speed sets on the compound lifts and then I do pullups and pushups etc in circuits.

    I'm going to Lancaster, don't know how seriously they take it there, but is it common for a uni club to train every day? Just thoght they might take it more seriously at Cambridge!
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    (Original post by j09)

    I'm going to Lancaster, don't know how seriously they take it there, but is it common for a uni club to train every day? Just thoght they might take it more seriously at Cambridge!

    my ex boyfriend rows for lancaster uni. their training schedule is fairly tough from what he's said (he's a novice, first year). he definately trains every day though, and i think had a couple of outings a week this year, but i guess it depends on which boat you get in.

    i'm in the same position OP, and i had a gym programme made for me by a personal trainer who (hopefully) knew what he was talking about - so at the moment i'm doing general weight training because i am a weakling too and have poor core strength...deadlifts, squats, the like. for cardio i'm doing HIIT on the erg. which is quite bad times, but i'm getting used to it.
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    It really depends what Uni you go to as to how much you will train. I train twice a day at uni, sometimes 3 times, but some less well known rowing unis may only train 5 times per week.

    As for what to do, I'd suggest mid length pieces, so 2 x 30mins (as already said) are pretty good, you will, without a doubt have a few 30min test @ Rate 20(ish) over the winter along with 5k's.
    So just doing fairly hard 30mins will benefit you. Also things like 40min ergs with 2 min bursts(@R26-28) every 5 or so minutes, that way you are doing a good mix (aerobic, anerobic) and it also makes things abit more interesting.
    I'd stick with fairly basic ergos at the moment, just to improve your fitness more, then hopefully once you get to Uni they will give you a training programme based around your target events.

    As for weights, Squats, Deadlifts, BB row, single arm rows, etc, are all good, and are the main muscles used in rowing, you'l throw a few other lifts in there aswell.
    Rep range, mix it up abit, so maybe 1 week 5 x 4-5, then the week after do higher rep stuff, 3 x 12 -15, and alternate weekly.
    This way you are building some strength and also improving endurance.

    Edit: OP just read you are a weakling, hahaha, so maybe 3 just stick with 5 x 5 for now, untill you get stronger. You muscle endurance will improve on the ergos anwyay.

    Help that all makes some sense.
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    Only rowed for a year but i can probably give you a bit of advice.

    First of trying to do an Erg as has been suggested already is going to be very tough if you don't have people there with you, not done it before or lack the technique.

    Erg training that I would suggest at first would be to row at rate 20strokes per min. (if it's a concept two rowing machine you can see it on most screen views), for a period of 5, 10, 15 mins etc till you feel comfortable - when it gets easy increase the time, check out Concept2 website for rowing technique help.

    Training:
    Deadlifts
    Squats
    Benchpress
    Bent over row/T-bar row

    do either 3 x 5, or we were told do 4 x 10 (10 reps 4 times).

    Do HIIT on a bike.

    Also rowing uses legs and core most so throw in some ab excersises (plank, crunches etc)

    hope that was helpful
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    wow thank you so much for all your replies! i've just got in and am just about to have dinner so i'll have a good old read through them all after
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    Yeah thanks for the replies guys. Another quick Q, right now I'm 6'1", 85kg at about 12%BF. How is this weight and body comp. for rowing? Could I do with losing weight? Or just leaning out a little bit? Or trying to gain some muscle?
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    have just read them all through and they are all extremely helpful, so thank you everyone! i'll be dishing out rep over the next few days.
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    (Original post by j09)
    Yeah thanks for the replies guys. Another quick Q, right now I'm 6'1", 85kg at about 12%BF. How is this weight and body comp. for rowing? Could I do with losing weight? Or just leaning out a little bit? Or trying to gain some muscle?
    I wouldn't worry too much about bf% at the moment, as soon as you start training alot you'll probabaly see your bodyfat % drop, although it doesn't really matter unless you are at the very top.
    At your height your weight seems good, maybe get up to 90kg (ish) as having that extra muscle weight and strength will improve your times abit.
    I'm just under 100kg at 6,4ft, and can definatley notice the difference when sat on the ergo compared to when i was around 80kg.
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    As far as I can see most rowers train everyday - which explains why they're so overtrained and they blow out as soon as your reach the upper levels of effort.
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    (Original post by Ramble)
    As far as I can see most rowers train everyday - which explains why they're so overtrained and they blow out as soon as your reach the upper levels of effort.
    What do you mean by that?
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    (Original post by Ramble)
    As far as I can see most rowers train everyday - which explains why they're so overtrained and they blow out as soon as your reach the upper levels of effort.
    WTF? Lol. Im sure most professional atheletes train everyday and I gather they're pretty good.
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    (Original post by Ramble)
    As far as I can see most rowers train everyday - which explains why they're so overtrained and they blow out as soon as your reach the upper levels of effort.
    You have to understand that in rowing training does not necessarily mean putting in a huge effort - you can go through an outing lasting over an hour and not actually exert that much energy if you're focusing on technical stuff.

    OP - at this stage you should be looking at building up base endurance and strength, with a greater focus on shorter, high intensity work when you're closer to racing. 2x30min/3x5-6k ergs and long cycles are useful, as are weights in the gym, particularly things like squats and deadlifts, looking at fairly small numbers of reps (5-8 probably).
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    I just made a new thread and was directed to this one. Just want to say thanks for the info and plus, is it worth taking training supplements? protein etc? or will just sticking to a healthy (as healthy as it can get at uni) going to suffice?
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    (Original post by Petrells)
    I just made a new thread and was directed to this one. Just want to say thanks for the info and plus, is it worth taking training supplements? protein etc? or will just sticking to a healthy (as healthy as it can get at uni) going to suffice?
    Protein supplements are exactly that - they supplement the protein intake you get from whole foods. If you eat a good diet of an appropriate size for someone training for rowing, you'll probably get enough protein anyway, but if you find you're struggling to get enough then go for some whey protein.
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    (Original post by Petrells)
    I just made a new thread and was directed to this one. Just want to say thanks for the info and plus, is it worth taking training supplements? protein etc? or will just sticking to a healthy (as healthy as it can get at uni) going to suffice?
    I don't row (yet, hoping to start this year when I get to uni) but I do compete in Triathlons, and do strength training and bodyweight workouts to complement it, so I guess my advice may be of some use.

    I take whey in the morning and after a workout. I take casein protein before I go to bed (slow releasing). As previously mentioned, you should get the majority of your protein from real foods, chicken, turkey, beef, lamn and pork and eggs are my favourites. I can't stand fish, otherwise I would eat that too. Aim for 2g/kg of bodyweight per day, if not more. I try to only get about 60g maximum of my protein per day from supplements.

    I also take about 2g of omega 3 fish oil per day, this helps to reduce inflammation, both muscular and systemic. This is especially important if you eat mostly grain fed, rather than grass fed meat. Our omega 3mega6 ratio should be round about 1:2 to 1:1, but with modern foods, it can be around 10:1, even if you are trying to eat healthy, and as bad as 30:1 if you eat crap. This is why I take a fish oil supplement.

    I also take a multi vitamin. A good one, not a ****** one from tescos. that contains about 5 vitamins in the wrong quantities. I know that I am probably pissing out a lot of it, but by logging my diet I can see that I do not reach the RDA on some vitamins and minerals, every day. So I take this as an insurance policy, really.

    I also take a probiotic. It says on the tub to take 2 tablets a day, but I don't reckon I need that many, especially seeing as I eat natural yoghurt for breakfast most days. I take 1 every 1-2 days, just to make sure I am maintaining a healthy balance of bacteria in my gut.

    Another thing is creatine, I don't currently take this, but I am seriously considering it.

    The only supplement I would say is absolutely necessary is the fish oil, it's damned hard to maintain a 1:2 ratio eating modern food that you buy in the supermarket.

    Take whey and casein powder if you need to get your protein levels higher, but don't take it in place of real foods.

    I take the other two more for general health and immunity that anything else, I don't think they're essential.
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    Indoor Rowing, Or Outdoor ... I have participated in the Boston Indoor rowing world championship's So If it is Indoor PM me for Infor if You Like.
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    (Original post by Belizibub)
    Indoor Rowing, Or Outdoor ... I have participated in the Boston Indoor rowing world championship's So If it is Indoor PM me for Infor if You Like.
    Given that it's something she's taking up an uni, it's almost certainly outdoor. You don't really 'take up' indoor rowing, you just decide you're going to start erging more. Obviously indoor rowing training is very relevant to outdoor rowing, though.
 
 
 
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